#1
I need a song to work my fast rhythm and solo skills - However I currently suck at both - well fast shreddy solo's anyway. Whats a good place to start? Like not to difficult? Then like list another song in difficulty order then so on, so this could be a guide for not just me, but anyone looking to improve their skills..
#2
If you practice a song you can't play really hard, you will eventually learn it. Play some thrash metal.
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#3
Quote by henkka_potku
If you practice a song you can't play really hard, you will eventually learn it. Play some thrash metal.

not saying its the best strategy, but it worked for me. early metallica stuff is good practice
#4
any song by august burns red.
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#5
Stuff from Norther or Amon Amarth does the Job
Then go for CoB , Chimaira , Arch Enemy or Threat Signal
#6
I don't particular like deathcore or any of that sort of thing but I have attempted the likes of Suicide Silence and The Black Dahlia Murder just to improve my rhythm and technical skills
It helps when it comes to learning songs you actually like
In terms of solos just start on slow solos then gradually get faster
thrash metal solos like those by Anthrax (Among The Living) and Marty Friedman era-Megadeth (Rust In Peace) are always good places to start and improve
But it'll always take time to learn stuff no matter how good you are
#7
If youre starting off with metal, thrash metal/classic metal really is best genre to start with.
#8
Metallica - creeping death or master of puppets. both fairly easy riffs in terms of technicality, but a ball ache to play in time for the duration of the song. Play them slow, build it up.
#9
Go buy a copy of Judas Priest British Steel.It covers just about all the bases in metal.Learn it live it love it.

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#10
It sounds like speed is your main problem, in which case I would advise you not to worry about specific songs. The best way to build up speed is to play simple runs through any basic scale. Focus on being precise - go as slow as you have to to ensure you don't make a single mistake. Repeat this over and over until you can do it at your starting speed without thinking about it. Then try to do it a little faster, then faster again and so on. Eventually (we're talking months, even years here) you'll be able to play pretty much anything you want.
If you rush yourself and try to play some complex solo or fast riff right away then all you're going to do is develop sloppy technique which may seem faster at first but in the long run slows you down considerably (plus makes you sound terrible).
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#12
Quote by MrFlibble
It sounds like speed is your main problem, in which case I would advise you not to worry about specific songs. The best way to build up speed is to play simple runs through any basic scale. Focus on being precise - go as slow as you have to to ensure you don't make a single mistake. Repeat this over and over until you can do it at your starting speed without thinking about it. Then try to do it a little faster, then faster again and so on. Eventually (we're talking months, even years here) you'll be able to play pretty much anything you want.
If you rush yourself and try to play some complex solo or fast riff right away then all you're going to do is develop sloppy technique which may seem faster at first but in the long run slows you down considerably (plus makes you sound terrible).

Exactly!
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#13
you're best bet IMO would be to get a metronome and practice going up and down a scale (which will help you memorize the scale.)

But don't start off trying to play fast. Start by alternate picking the notes of any scale at a slow speed, anywhere from say 45-60 bpm would be a good start. Only set the bpm at a tempo where you can play all the notes precisely. If you try and play too fast it will end up sounding sloppy. Once you are comfortable playing for about a week or two at a certain tempo, increase the speed by a small increment.

And one important tip for the metronome exercise:

some days you'll be playing faster and more precise than others, but this is perfectly normal. IE You'll blaze through 90 bpm on Monday, but stumble through 85 bpm on Wednesday

so the bottom line is just give it time and a lot of patience and practice good playing habits, which will make you sound better in the long run

PS

you know how everybody keeps throwing around the phrase "Practice makes Perfect?" WRONG It would be more correct to say "Practice makes PERMANENT"

If you spend your practice time trying to play faster than your capable of, you'll eventually get faster, but you'll also become sloppy, sounding more like Kerry King or a drunk Joe Perry (and it'll be much harder to break the sloppiness habit in the future) But if you start off with good practice habits and patience right from the get-go, you can literally achieve anything