#1
I decided I want to reword my original post. Let's try this...

I have a bass amp that requires a minimum 4 ohm load. I currently have have a 6x10 4 ohm cab. If I connect the 610 to the amp I get full power output.

I'm getting a very nice, custom hand made boutique-ish 2x12 cab that is also 4 ohms, and am trying to figure out what possible ways I can connect the cab to this setup.

I understand if I use one output on the amp to each cab, this creates a parallel circuit with 2 ohms resistance, frying my amp because of lack of resistance.

If I connect the amp output to the 610, then connect the second jack on the 610 to the 212, is this a series circuit, giving me a total of 8 ohms resistance?

If that doesn't work, what else can I do? One option I think would be possible would be to swap the 610 for an 8 ohm 410. Assuming the 212 has two 8 ohm speakers inside wired in parallel, I could wire the actual speakers in series, creating a total load of 16 ohms. Then an 8 ohm and 16 ohm cab wired in parallel would be 5.33 ohms which would be acceptable, and actually send more power to each cab than wiring them in series as previously mentioned.

I have a very elementary grasp of this subject. Could anyone confirm/correct my thought process here, or offer another possibility?
Last edited by Lazarus.Bird at Aug 4, 2010,
#3
Quote by Lukeeeeeeeeeee.
TBH, If you run them in series... The sound will be SHITE?


Umm...I'm not sure how changing wiring sequence (especially to a higher impedance) could adversely affect the sound quality.

Though yes your basic physics is right, series wiring equals an 8 ohm load but I also don't know how it's done.

My only possible thought is (assuming your amp has 2 speaker outs) run one cab to each.
#4
Wouldn't connecting one cab to each output essentially put them in a parallel circuit running at 2 amps and fry the amp due to lack of proper resistance?
#5
Your physics is right, and people actually do this a lot. But if you dont already know how to do it, my advice is to get it done professionally
#6
Could you elaborate? I'd like to know what options I have if any.

And I don't necessarily need them in series, just want to know how to connect both cabs to my amp.
Last edited by Lazarus.Bird at Aug 3, 2010,
#7
What's the cab configuration?
What's the impedance of the speakers? Not the cab, but the speakers inside.
#8
Not sure... The one cab is an svt-610 HLF. The other which I don't have yet is an EarCandy BassBomb 212. Depending on how much I like the 212 I might want to integrate it into my current rig with the 610. What if l swapped the 610 with a 410 HE (8 ohms) would this make the situation easier?
#9
^^
Lets assume the 2x12 is two 8ohm speakers in parallel yielding a 4ohm load. If you rewired them in series, you'd get a 16 ohm load.
If you swapped the other 4ohm cab for an 8ohm, you could run both cabs in parallel at 5.33ohms.
Some diagrams...
http://www.jumbosunshade.com/swd01.htm
Oh, the 16ohm cab with the 4ohm will give you 3.20ohms in parallel.
Last edited by OtamotPuhctek at Aug 3, 2010,
#10
Very interesting and great post! This is a lot of work to just try this out... If the 212 was wired for 16 ohms would it receive much less power and not be as loud as the other cab?
#11
^^
I'm no expert, but a 4ohm cab will draw more power from an amp than an 8ohm cab. So in theory, your 16ohm cab will draw less power and probably not be as loud as the 8ohm.
What you might consider is using the 2x12 for rehearsals/small gigs, and take the 6x10 on larger venues. Ultimately, your best option would be to have a matched pair(both Ampeg) of 8ohm cabs with your existing head, or a second(matched) 4ohm cab with a head that is built to handle a 2ohm load.
#12
Really the 610 works fine on it's own just toying with the idea of using the 212 with it.

If I do amp output to 610 then 610 to 212 is that series?
#14
You really don't want to rewire your cabs just to try something out and it isn't necessary either

Your best bet is to get a lead made up to connect your two cabs up in series and any decent repair man should be able to do this for you.
#15
Could you physically explain how the cabs would be connected then?

It seems like the simplest solution would be to swap my amp for one that operates at 2 ohms D:

Also found this link: http://www.colomar.com/Shavano/spkr_wiring_sp.html

That explains a lot. How much volume/loudness would I lose by wiring them in series with an 8 ohm load?

And if I rewired the 610 jacks to input/output series, I would always need to have an extension cab connected to the 610 and it would not work alone, correct? That patch box seems like a nice idea.
Last edited by Lazarus.Bird at Aug 4, 2010,
#16
Quote by Lazarus.Bird
Could you physically explain how the cabs would be connected then?

It seems like the simplest solution would be to swap my amp for one that operates at 2 ohms D:

Also found this link: http://www.colomar.com/Shavano/spkr_wiring_sp.html

That explains a lot. How much volume/loudness would I lose by wiring them in series with an 8 ohm load?

And if I rewired the 610 jacks to input/output series, I would always need to have an extension cab connected to the 610 and it would not work alone, correct? That patch box seems like a nice idea.


The patch box is what you need (or you can wire a lead to do exactly the same thing). There are loads of other ways of achieving the same effect inside the cabs but an external solution is easier and leaves the cabs unaffected when you come to trade them in or use them on their own.

You will lose 3dB by doubling the impedance but gain by increasing the surface area of the speakers. Without knowing all the details of the amp and the relative efficiencies of the different speakers you can't be categorical but you will probably find that overall there is no reduction in volume and possibly a small gain. You will also find that there will be less compression of deep bass when the volume is up high.

I really wouldn't routinely operate an amp at 2ohms, the high currents demanded are not good for reliability long term.