#1
Hey guys, I have an issue with the recording process, its the sound of my picking. In every recording I make, no matter how awesome I feel it is, theres always that background sound of my pick hitting the strings, and I don't know how to get rid of it. Simply moving away from the mic hasn't worked, and I'm at a loss. How do I fix this problem?

EDIT: I mean with an electric, sorry about that.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

Last edited by valennic at Aug 3, 2010,
#3
try different pick thicknesses/sizes. i use a dunlop jazz 3 for electric/acoustic playing. it's fairly thick and very very small. to me, smaller picks don't make as much noise
#5
I mean an electric, hence the issue. If it was an acoustic I wouldn't mind. It'd seem more natural. But with an electric it just seems sloppy.

I do use jazz IIIs

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#6
they only way to completly get rid of it is to use hammerons, pull offs, bends, and taping, if your playing an electric its pretty much impossible to silence the pick (from my experience anyway)
#7
Before even starting I want to say that this post is not meant to offend.

Having said that, it could be something as fundamental as HOW you pick, do you go in too deep on the strings? Is additional tension in your right hand causing the problem?

I'd say your best bet is a combination of two things:

1. pedromiles101 has a good point, if you're shredding with a thin pick, theres your problem.

2. Grab a metronome, slow WAY down, and pick cleanly. Record it. If you hear it at low speeds, its a technique problem. If you dont, its obvious that you need to work on accuracy and touch.

Good luck bud!!!
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#8
Is there a way to reduce its volume to damn near nothing though?

I've tried every type of EQing I can manage on my computer, and I'm just irritated by that clicking sound it makes in all my recordings.

Quote by gizmodious
Before even starting I want to say that this post is not meant to offend.

Having said that, it could be something as fundamental as HOW you pick, do you go in too deep on the strings? Is additional tension in your right hand causing the problem?

I'd say your best bet is a combination of two things:

1. pedromiles101 has a good point, if you're shredding with a thin pick, theres your problem.

2. Grab a metronome, slow WAY down, and pick cleanly. Record it. If you hear it at low speeds, its a technique problem. If you dont, its obvious that you need to work on accuracy and touch.

Good luck bud!!!


No offence taken at all man, criticism is something I take very much to heart, and I'll definitely check on it. I didn't even consider it may have been my technique. If it is that's just gonna blow, I'll have to spend weeks on my technique, after 3 years of playing

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

Last edited by valennic at Aug 3, 2010,
#9
Quote by vidieowiz4
they only way to completly get rid of it is to use hammerons, pull offs, bends, and taping, if your playing an electric its pretty much impossible to silence the pick (from my experience anyway)


+1, although you can make it negligible with focused practice.
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#10
Can't you put the mic in a seperate room?

If you can't then either pick softer or, if worse comes to worse, EQ it out as much as you can.

Could you post a clip so we can hear how bad it is?
#11
Quote by maggot9779
Can't you put the mic in a seperate room?

If you can't then either pick softer or, if worse comes to worse, EQ it out as much as you can.

Could you post a clip so we can hear how bad it is?


I can't, I have the setup in my bedroom, and I monitor my sound via headphones. The cables arent nearly long enough to do that. I could possibly sit outside my bedroom and try it, but that'd just be weird. Might have to though

I can't today, due to the time. I have a noise curfew on my guitaring, after a certain time I'm not allowed to play on my amp

I can tomorrow for sure though. That wouldn't be a problem at all

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#13
Just a thought....

How about micing your picking hand onto a different track and then reverse the phase to cancel it out?

A soundclip would be helpful...?
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
#14
Quote by cuthbertg
Just a thought....

How about micing your picking hand onto a different track and then reverse the phase to cancel it out?

A soundclip would be helpful...?



But then you might accidentally lower the volume of your actual guitar, it the amp bleeds into this mic.

what I've ascertained is that TS has an electric guitar, an amplifier, a microphone, and a mic cord... And an interface. And the problem that he's facing is that the sound from the acoustics of the electrified instrument are bleeding into his tracks.

The only surefire way is to isolate the amp from where you're playing. Consider draping your amp and mic with a heavy blanket. The upside is that you're not going to get the sound of the pick against the strings, the downside is that, if done wrong, your tracks will sound dull and dampened.

If you can, throw your amplifier into a closet, mic it, and close the door. No bleed from your hands.
#15
Push the mic up against the cab (example). Play away from the amp, 10 feet or so. Turn the amp up. If you can hear your strings above the amp, you aren't recording loud enough, IMO. If you can't turn up that loud, either wait until your parents leave for some reason, or just live with it for the time being.

Quote by L2112Lif
The only surefire way is to isolate the amp from where you're playing. Consider draping your amp and mic with a heavy blanket. The upside is that you're not going to get the sound of the pick against the strings, the downside is that, if done wrong, your tracks will sound dull and dampened.

Isolating the amp is also a very good idea if you have volume constraints.

And as far as effects go, if you're desperate, try a compressor, with an attack of 0, a pre-attack if your compressor effect can, of 1-2 ms, a relase of about 10ms, and a ratio of about 7-1. Play with the threshold to get the right amount. That's the best thing I can think of, and it still won't fix it all the way.
Last edited by morrock at Aug 4, 2010,