#1
I love playing stuff like this using pure alt picking...

    _____________   _____________   _____________
   |      5      | |      5      | |      5      |
e|---------9-12-15-12-9---------------9-12-15-12-9-|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-9-12-15--------------15-12-9-12-15--------------|


... My problem, however, is getting the skips beyond that 'barrier'. I'm an outside picker and anything on 2 adjacent strings is fine, but that skip just feels cumbersome when I try to speed it up.

I've tried slowing things down to a crawl and working the speed back up to where the barrier occurs, and what happens is that my picking motion ends up smacking the middle string during the skip. This is because the arc of my hand leaping over that string gets smaller and smaller as the speed increases, and then ends up buzzing that string.

So my question is - what is the best way to minimise that leaping arc, whilst not accidently hitting the middle string? The most efficient method I've ever seen is Lane's infamous 'snap'-picking technique, but is it possible to do it without holding the pick in his weird way? I've got a standard grip with a 25-degree forward tilt.
#3
Quote by tenfold
Either a lot of practice or pick once per string and do it legato.


Noooo, I've been doing way too much of that easy legato shit lately. I want to be a man and be able to pick every note.

Plus it's all good and well to say "practice", but what exactly am I supposed to practice? There are several different techniques.
#4
stretchy riff
hmm the only string skipping riff i know is universal mind
maybe try anchoring to maintain control of your fretting hand and try easing up on the grip of your pick..Try tilting your pick to avoid all contact with the string your skipping
Hmm string skipping ain't easy the only way to get something like this down is like the guy above said ^ practice
#5
Freepower, get your brain in here - you know all that in-depth picking mechanics and stuff.
#6
Quote by metalheadblues

...maybe try anchoring to maintain control of your fretting hand...


No, Don't!

Anchoring limits your technique.

As for playing the lick, I wouldn't play that with strict "outside picking" myself (and I hope that by saying "I'm an outside picker" you mean that's a preference and not a rule for you?). However, it can be done.

Is your problem that the string rings out? Because that's probably an issue with muting technique.

Question. How's your muting? When playing the E string you should be muting the A string with the underside of your fingers. Then, as you move up to the D string the A string can either be muted with the palm of your picking hand, or the very tip of your fretting fingers.

If you're gripping the pick properly then that's probably not the issue. How much are you digging in to each string? Oftentimes people will dig in too much (which makes the arc of the pick over the A string start from a lower position, and is more likely to hit it on the way past).

It might be just that as you are increasing the tempo you're inadvertently tensing up- even a tiny bit (which would take away the freedom to make a full "arc" over the A string- it would only take a tiny, almost unnoticeable, amount of tension)!

Also, is the motion over the A string coming primarily from your wrist, or your arm? It should really be a combination- by the main movement should be coming from your wrist (your arm is bigger and less agile- more clumsy- for this kind of work).

I know I've just kinda listed a bunch of stuff that it could be, but without me actually being there to see I guess you're gunna have to just check through everything on that list

If it's not any of that then we're going to need more details in order to help you...
#7
So my question is - what is the best way to minimise that leaping arc, whilst not accidently hitting the middle string? The most efficient method I've ever seen is Lane's infamous 'snap'-picking technique, but is it possible to do it without holding the pick in his weird way?


I think this kind of thing really tests your whole arm/shoulder relaxation. You need to get the whole assembly moving fluidly to make those big jumps so I'd check that first.

Second thing is to devise some interesting string skipping etudes or licks. Try playing a few scales and octave displacing every other note or doing some arpeggio sequences.

Afraid I gotta run now but let me know what your results are with those two pointers.