#1
Alright, So when I was learning the Major and Minor scales I found out how every scale has a relative that contained the same notes so it would look the same on the fretboard. So, after learning the Minor scale on the whole fretboard, I moved on assuming it would be the same, you know? So basically what I'm asking is I learned the five Minor scale positions and never bothered looking into the Major scales positions assuming they are the same (I still haven't found out if there different), did I do wrong?
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#2
You seem to be confused. The natural minor scale has the same construction as the major scale started on its 6th tone.

So, C major contains the same notes as A minor. THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT C MAJOR AND A MINOR ARE THE SAME AND INTERCHANGEABLE!! C major resolves to C and A minor resolves to A. Big difference. Shapes are the same though, just shifted over three frets, if that's what you're asking...

If you learn those scales from those fingerings, you MUST note where the root note is in both scenarios.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#3
Well... I think an important question that should be asked is, do you know how the relative major and minor scales work? The shift in the tonal center (A minor versus C major), the interval?
Gotta finish my work, then play some grooves, so I can turn my room into a house of blues...
#4
Quote by hockeyplayer168
You seem to be confused. The natural minor scale has the same construction as the major scale started on its 6th tone.

So, C major contains the same notes as A minor. THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT C MAJOR AND A MINOR ARE THE SAME AND INTERCHANGEABLE!! C major resolves to C and A minor resolves to A. Big difference. Shapes are the same though, just shifted over three frets, if that's what you're asking...

If you learn those scales from those fingerings, you MUST note where the root note is in both scenarios.


Yeah my bad, I mean positions, I know the scales aren't in the same order and intervals are different and all that stuff. I think this will help you understand my question. I learned these positions: http://gosk.com/scales/natural-minor-scale-for-guitar.php
As you see it is the minor scales positions. But I want to know if I wanted to play a relative major scale would I use the same positions or do I have to learn different positions for the major scale.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV
Last edited by unicornfist at Aug 4, 2010,
#5
Quote by unicornfist
Yeah my bad, I mean positions, I know the scales aren't in the same order and intervals are different and all that stuff. I think this will help you understand my question. I learned these positions: http://gosk.com/scales/natural-minor-scale-for-guitar.php
As you see it is the minor scales positions. But I want to know if I wanted to play a relative major scale would I use the same positions or do I have to learn different positions for the major scale.



No, not really as its in the notes you use and resolve to that give the sound. Personally I would learn a full scale across the fretboard (major or minor) learn the modes of it. Then you can focus more on resolving to the notes of said modes, instead of learning a bunch of small patterns. That's just me though.
#6
Quote by unicornfist
Yeah my bad, I mean positions, I know the scales aren't in the same order and intervals are different and all that stuff. I think this will help you understand my question. I learned these positions: http://gosk.com/scales/natural-minor-scale-for-guitar.php
As you see it is the minor scales positions. But I want to know if I wanted to play a relative major scale would I use the same positions or do I have to learn different positions for the major scale.


Everyone keeps answering without answering your actual question.

YES the positions will be the same. But as everyone on here said, they are not the same scales. The scale you use will depend on the musical context and its resolution.

While it's good to learn these patterns, they can be very limiting. Don't get trapped only learning these patterns. Use your head to. Learn your intervals. Learn them again. Memorize them. Apply them and see which intervals are put together to form these scales. Learn the theory behind when and why these scales work over certain progressions. Then, you will see opportunities break the rules and use notes that aren't within these boxed patterns.
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Quote by Jackal58
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#7
You're playing the same 7 notes (all the white piano key notes) on both scales, so different positions are not necessary at this stage. For right now I would concentrate on simply finding these notes all over the fretboard. Make it your goal to rise beyond "positions".

These are a great starting point. Contrary to what some others have said, I think setting artificial limitations is an excellent way to divide and conquer, allowing you to master a small series of simple tasks, which you'll be able to connect together later on.

So... after you know these position scales very well, the next thing I might do is learn the same scale on just the high E string top to bottom, and then the other 5 strings - one at a time. Then combine to learn on pairs of adjacent strings (again top to bottom), and so on. That should begin to change your whole perception of things.

Now start inventing licks that mix both fixed and moving neck positions. Get creative. Over time your view of a scale as a bunch of dots at a certain fret will fade... "positions" won't matter so much. Life will be good