#1
Excessively Shortened Version Of Backstory:
Today I went to jam with a drummer friend of mine. He invited a mutual friend who has being playing bass for like a year. I have been playing for two years. He could play YYZ by Rush and Panic Attack by Dream Theater. I can't play Paranoid by Black Sabbath.
So yeah, I'm kinda deppressed right now. Feel like a shit bassist. The good part is it's motivated me to stop f*cking around and get serious. So I need a practice routine. A good intensive one. I mainly play pickstyle BTW. Please do help, and yes I do intend to practice daily unless something stops me from playing but I don't want to spend more than a day without practicing, at least 'til I feel I'm finally good enough (= being able to play complex bass solos). But I need the routine to be detailed (like, repeat this X times, at X bpm, etc). Please I'm desperate. Thank you.
Last edited by Silveroon009 at Aug 5, 2010,
#2
First, I'm just going to put it out there that it's not a competition. It's great that you're more motivated to practice now, but I warn you, don't compare your progress against other players. You'll just end up stressing yourself out unnecessarily.

Now on to business. Would you like ideas for an overall well-rounded practice routine, or is there anything in particular you're having trouble with and you'd like to spend a little extra time on during your practice sessions? Also, how well do you know your fretboard and your scales, and can you give us a bit of a reference point as to the current extent of your abilities?
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#3
you should search before posting.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#4
Quote by Tostitos
First, I'm just going to put it out there that it's not a competition. It's great that you're more motivated to practice now, but I warn you, don't compare your progress against other players. You'll just end up stressing yourself out unnecessarily.

Now on to business. Would you like ideas for an overall well-rounded practice routine, or is there anything in particular you're having trouble with and you'd like to spend a little extra time on during your practice sessions? Also, how well do you know your fretboard and your scales, and can you give us a bit of a reference point as to the current extent of your abilities?

I don't know my fretboard, if you mean notes and where they are. I just go by fret numbers in tabs... I know 2 scales: Major and Minor. And currently the only songs I can play are For Whom the Bell Tolls, Enter Sandman, Ace of Spades, Sunshine of Your Love and Come Together. Yup, that's about it. I could add Seek & Destroy in there but the fast part I can't play. I've also tried Peace Sells and I have a lot of trouble with the intro. In Paranoid I can't seem to nail the: 7-9 7-9 part without messing it up. So yeah that's the current extent of my "abilities"...

Oh and I'd like ideas for an overall well-rounded practice routine please.
Current Gear:
Peavey Zodiac DE Scorpio (Bass)
Yamaha RBX-170 (Bass)
Boss ODB-3 (Overdrive Pedal)
Line 6 LowDown 150 (Amp)
Last edited by Silveroon009 at Aug 5, 2010,
#5
^ well then, start with the basics. Learn your fretboard. The memorization is a bit tedious at first, but it doesn't take too long to get it down. I always suggest warming up with spider exercises, and then I'd suggest you practice scales, scales, scales, 'til they come out of your ears.

I'd say warm up for 5-10 minutes (stretch out and loosen up, spider exercises), spend maybe 20 or 30 minutes at a time working on the more theory-based side (in this case notes on the fretboard, scales, etc.), and 20-30 minutes mucking around and having fun learning a new song or two.

If you think you're up for a longer practice session you can always add in some time to spend working on perfecting your left and/or right hand technique.

Also, if you can't already, learning to read music is something you may consider in your spare time, or even later down the road. While its not the easiest or the quickest thing to pick up, its definitely a handy skill to have.

EDIT: I know this sounds like a very bland practice regimen, but once you get the bare-bones basics down the doors open up and you can move into more complex areas without feeling like you're in over your head.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
Last edited by Tostitos at Aug 5, 2010,
#6
learn scales and intervals and play them WITH A METRONOME those little rythm nazis will help a bunch. start at 60 bpm and work your way up untill you can't go any faster.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#7
I would say, practice whateer you're working on with a metronome, starting with a tempo you can play easily and then increasing in increments of about 3bpm each time, this may seem useless but it increases your fluency on the instrument.

I don't know about anyone else, but I tend to think in movable patterns, for example:

For a major arpeggio, you play the root note, then the 3rd on the string above a fret behind, then the 5th is a string and two frets up from the root, then the string up from the 5th is the octave.

Does this make sense/work for you?

If it does, work out the movable patterns then focus on learning the notes of your fretboard.

Ibanez SR506BM
Ashdown Little Giant 1000w
Peavey TVX 115+410
A big ass upright

Last edited by m4l666 at Aug 5, 2010,