#1
I've got a music question I hope you can help me with:

How would you define Rock n' Roll?

Now I understand that for any form of music it's art, not a system, but there are certain standard components that will define a song so that it fits to a genre.
I want to know what these are for Rock.

I understand a bit about blues and I would define it like this:
-The type of common chord progressions e.g. I-IV-V
-Some examples of common riffs
-That minor tones are commonly used in major scales and vice versa to give a "blues" feel.
-Some examples of standard arrangements, e.g 12-bar-blues

Could you help me do the same for Rock?

Thanks
#2
Rock is so much more than chord progressions and techniques dude. People have written whole books on the subject and not defined rock... so good luck.
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#3
The straight drum rhythm and electric instruments is what defines it. You could use any chord progression for it, but yeah you could say it's more blues oriented.
#4
Crunchy Guitars, 4/4 time, Guitar solos, loud vocals, loud drums, use of minor scale...
#5
Are there any artists or specific songs you can recommend for me to listen to that are typical of the genre so that I could look for similarities and "standard components" of rock?

I have heard that one "standard component" of rock is that in 4/4 the emphasis of the rhythm guitar will be on the 1st and 3rd beats of each bar. Does anyone here know if that's correct?

Thanks again
#6
Quote by Audacity
I have heard that one "standard component" of rock is that in 4/4 the emphasis of the rhythm guitar will be on the 1st and 3rd beats of each bar. Does anyone here know if that's correct?

Thanks again


Can't believe that this would be an appropriate sign for a rock song because there are at least 1 million rock songs where the rhythm guitar does not even play the 3rd of a bar, but nevertheless you'd call it definitely rock.

Also theres absolutely nothing wrong with emphasising a "backbeat" (2nd and 4th are emphasised). Without rhythmic variations it would be a little boring.

Could be though that maybe in the beginning of rock most of the songs had this pattern you described. Don't know and would be imo unimportant anyway because you should not limit yourself because of some rules somebody said.

For me rock especially is a genre which is also defined by attitude.
In "common" rock you don't have to be a virtuoso or technical genius. You play what you like and if others dont like it you give a shit. It's some kind of "dirty" genre if you want to call it that way. xD
Last edited by Blutrot at Aug 6, 2010,
#7
Everything you ave all said can be called common in rock, but they are not definitions. I am really not sure if it can be defined in words(at least not a small amount of them). There is so much variation.
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#8
Young alkies and druggies playing random pentatonics, pretending to be rebels but eventually sell out to walmarts (like ac/dc) or tv shows like american idol (like steven tyler) or similar? They also wrote maybe 3 original songs and the rest just sound similar.
#9
Rock is essentially a louder, more distorted form of blues.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Back beat.
Oh yeah.

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A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.