#1
For a while now I've been using Dunlop 10's tuned to Drop C. There's never been any buzzing because of the guage size, but I've been breaking them left and right. The other guitarrist in my band has the same strings, gauge, and tuning, but barely ever breaks them. Is it just my playing style? Or is something wrong with my guitar? I could definitely use some advice.
#3
same here, i use that gauge string but in standard tuning and ive had 4 guitars and my strings have been snapping all over the place.

maybe its how i play, but they seem to snap in different places all of the time, near the bridge, top of the neck, middle of neck....
#4
I would say that you're being too heavy handed and trying to belt the strings too hard...
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#5
Try a different brand. Different peoples hands react differently to different string brands FACt.
#6
Can you be more specific? Is it a particular string that keeps breaking? Is it a couple strings? Do the tend to break in the same spot?
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#7
Quote by coolstoryangus
Try a different brand. Different peoples hands react differently to different string brands FACt.

I use super slinkys, and I have broken 2 string in about 3 years since I switched to them... I reckon they're awesome. Might be worth getting hold of the appropriate gauge slinkys.
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#8
Look at your pick-ups. If that potting pole (?) is too high, when you fret notes down at the lowest part of the fretboard (~17th fret) and pick them, they could be hitting the poles as they vibrate. Another thing to check for is to fret it down there and bend it up really far and see if its hitting the adjacent pole.

If this is what's going on, loosen up the two screws on each side of the pick-up to lower it down. Make sure you lower both sides evenly, unless one is higher than the other. With your set up, I'd give each potting pole about 1.5-2mm of space from the string so they have room to ring.
#9
I would guess it's the playing, I used to breake strings now and then when I just started to play guitar. But now I can't manage however I try :b
#10
I don't break strings unless they're old, and then I only ever break them by bending too far. xD
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#11
Quote by Jimmy_Page_Zep
Can you be more specific? Is it a particular string that keeps breaking? Is it a couple strings? Do the tend to break in the same spot?


this

it could be symptomatic of a sharp points where the string touch the saddles or a problem with the nut.
#12
Quote by ibanezgod1973
this

it could be symptomatic of a sharp points where the string touch the saddles or a problem with the nut.


Buying some graphite saddles greatly reduced my string breakage... not that it's much I have a couple strings well over a year old. Mostly helped the lower strings... haven't broken one of those in years.

I play fairly aggressively too.
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#13
Quote by Jimmy_Page_Zep
Can you be more specific? Is it a particular string that keeps breaking? Is it a couple strings? Do the tend to break in the same spot?


It's usually not the lowest or highest strings, just the four in the middle probably because I use them more, and it's pretty much always at the bridge when they break
#14
Check to make sure there are no sharp edges at the bridge then. Even when I play aggressively my strings never break.
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#16
I don't see how people manage to break strings. I play SRV-heavy-handed and the only time I've ever had string breakage was with a burred saddle and really old strings.

Seriously, I pick hard as shit, and mine hold up.

Check your bridge for burrs. Oh. What type of bridge is it? Floyd, Tune-O-Matic, Strat style...?

If it's a Floyd, I can't help you there . If it's a TOM, check the saddles for burrs, and either get them filed or replaced. I had a problem with my D string on my SG breaking all the time. I got a Schaller rolling bridge on it now, and it works wonders. If it's a Strat style, you might have worn grooves into the saddles themselves. You could either again get them filed, or I like the GraphTech saddles.
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#17
Floyds arent even too bad for breaking strings. I wont have anything but edges or ofrs now for a locking trem and ever since that rule i never break strings. On cheap locking trems i used to break strings all the time.
#18
I've never had a locking trem. I think next summer I'm going to turn my MIM Strat into an 80's hair/glam metal monster .

I'm thinking OFR, Motor City something in the bridge, and nothing else. I may repaint it in black and white zebra stripes like Criss Olivia's Charvel from the first couple Savatage albums .
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#19
Quote by jackpotjesus52
It's usually not the lowest or highest strings, just the four in the middle probably because I use them more, and it's pretty much always at the bridge when they break


Sounds like a a problem with your bridge. Feel around for sharp points/edges.
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Egnater Tweaker

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#20
well I don't really know how to tell if there's any sharp points in the indents where the strings go cuz I can't really get my fingers into them but they look really rusted, idk if that makes any difference
#21
Quote by jackpotjesus52
well I don't really know how to tell if there's any sharp points in the indents where the strings go cuz I can't really get my fingers into them but they look really rusted, idk if that makes any difference


That's probably what's causing your strings to break. See if you can get rid of the rust with some soft steel wool or something. Nothing to abrasive, you don't want to damage your guitar. Just enough to rub the rust off. Throw on some new strings and see if that fixes your problem
Fender American Vintage '62 Stratocaster
Gibson Les Paul Custom
TC Electronic Polytune
Danelectro Blue Paisley
EHX Big Muff Pi w/ Tone Wicker
Dunlop Crybaby
EHX Deluxe Memory Boy
Egnater Tweaker

Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.
#22
Just broke my high e string myself, but it was overdue for a re-stringing. Gotta stick to 5 string til tomorrow...
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#23
any who somebody mentioned srv and it reminded me of what his guitar tech Rene something did to keep the strings from breaking all the time of number one. this is copy pastied from http://www.tangledupinblues.com/setup.html if you wanna check it out more. kinda long but read it all i think itll help.

Bridge saddles
Stevie’s Number One wants to break high E and B strings at the saddle every chance she gets. Rene showed me why the strings break, and how he takes care of the problem: As a string breaks out of the vintage Strat tremolo block/bridge top plate, it “breaks” or contacts, the metal directly; this causes a slight kink that weakens the string. With the bridge saddles removed, Rene uses a Dremel Moto-Tool to grind the holes edge until the lip is smooth and gradual, and any binding is eliminated.

Number One uses vintage replacement saddles (the originals wore out long ago), and they’re not all alike — some have a shorter string slot than others. The high E and B strings may contact the front edge of this string clearance slot as they rise toward the “takeoff point” at the saddle’s peak. The kink formed by the contact stretches into the saddle peak during tuning, and breaks right at the crown. Rene elongates the slot, again by grinding, and then smoothes any rough metal edges. Finally, he slides a 5/8"-long piece of plastic tubing (insulation from electrical wire) over each string to protect it from the metal “break points.” He uses the heaviest piece of tubing he can get that still fits down the tremolo/block hole. Even with this, the high strings still cut through the plastic quickly (sometimes in one set), and when they do, the strings break. Rene plans to try a Teflon wire insulation if he can find the right size.
#24
Stop being so br00tAl on teh strings.
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