#1
I'm a very solid rhythm player, and can play/transpose the pentatonic and blues scales pretty well, but I seriously lack the theory behind solo writing. So here's a situation.

Let's say the rhythm guitar in the song are the chords- C, A, F, G- major chords

If I am writing a solo for this, I am under the impression that I need to change pentatonic scales for the licks I play as the rhythm chords change, but do I play Major or Minor?

In other words, would I play a C major scale lick, then move to an A major scale lick, or would I play any of these scales in MINOR pentatonic as I solo over those chords? Thanks guys!
#2
Quote by bigfoamfinger
I'm a very solid rhythm player, and can play/transpose the pentatonic and blues scales pretty well, but I seriously lack the theory behind solo writing. So here's a situation.

Let's say the rhythm guitar in the song are the chords- C, A, F, G- major chords

If I am writing a solo for this, I am under the impression that I need to change pentatonic scales for the licks I play as the rhythm chords change, but do I play Major or Minor?

In other words, would I play a C major scale lick, then move to an A major scale lick, or would I play any of these scales in MINOR pentatonic as I solo over those chords? Thanks guys!


You could, if you wanted to, switch between major pentatonics of the root of each chord, although changing keys that often wouldn't sound great. Here's how I would look at it:

Cmaj: C, E, G
Amaj: A, C#, E
Fmaj: F, A, C
Gmaj: G, B, D

Put those notes in order:

A, B, C, C#, D, E, F, G

This is clearly a C major progression, but I think the Amaj is throwing you off because of the C#. If I were playing this, I would play in C major pentatonic (C, D, E, G, A) over everything, but avoid the C natural over the A major chord. I would probably even throw in a couple C#s over the A major, just to emphasize it a bit.

There are probably more ways to work around the C#, but this is the simplest and most obvious ways.
Fender American Vintage '62 Stratocaster
Gibson Les Paul Custom
TC Electronic Polytune
Danelectro Blue Paisley
EHX Big Muff Pi w/ Tone Wicker
Dunlop Crybaby
EHX Deluxe Memory Boy
Egnater Tweaker

Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.
Last edited by Jimmy_Page_Zep at Aug 5, 2010,
#3
You've sort of got the idea. Yes, you do want to use chord tones, but you don't have to keep switching positions. You can, but it's not ideal. Pentatonic is made up of only 5 notes. the 1, 2, 4,5,6 of a scale. When you play, you want to try to utilise the root of the the chord (however much is up to you.) So take the solo for Stairway to Heaven for example. the chords during the solo are Am, G, and F. Whenever the rhythm hits the F, Page ends his phrases on an F (at least in the beginning parts).
"The most important thing about music is energy and emotion, not how well you can play. Technique should be a tool to achieve your vision, not the other way around."
-Jeff Tuttle

More guitar, less ultimate-guitar!
#4
Quote by bigfoamfinger
I'm a very solid rhythm player, and can play/transpose the pentatonic and blues scales pretty well, but I seriously lack the theory behind solo writing. So here's a situation.

Let's say the rhythm guitar in the song are the chords- C, A, F, G- major chords

If I am writing a solo for this, I am under the impression that I need to change pentatonic scales for the licks I play as the rhythm chords change, but do I play Major or Minor?

In other words, would I play a C major scale lick, then move to an A major scale lick, or would I play any of these scales in MINOR pentatonic as I solo over those chords? Thanks guys!

Nope, you wouldn't usually do that.

Most of the time you'll simply use the scale that corresponds to the key of the song, but use the chords to guide you as to which notes of the scale to use.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Honestly you really need to spend time studying and experimenting with improvisation techniques over chord progressions.

People can tell you what might work, so you don't sound like ass... but this is not helping you very much.

Record this progression in a loop and improvise over it for an hour or twenty... Experiment different approaches and see what you like.

I have some ideas how I might approach, but maybe that's not your flavor. See? Let your own ears dictate your approach.

[edit] as steven seagull noted chords and scales are really guides. Good point.
Last edited by cringer at Aug 6, 2010,
#6
You don't need to keep changing the scale on every chord change. Just take the key of the actual song and play that pentatonic scale with it.

The best way to learn is to experiment with scales and chords and see what sounds best. Good luck with writing your song.
Gear:


Squier Tele Custom ii (p90 version)

Orange Crush 10

Fender CD140S