#1
hey guys. first off, I'm a beginner. I understand how to play chords, scales and tabs, but... Instead of taking the time to learn songs, what if I only learn riffs and solos? can I then use this knowledge to play my own riffs and solos? and maybe then come up with my own songs? and If I do, how long do you think it's gonna take if I'm a fast learner?
I can probably figure out this answer for myself, but I'd rather find out from someone who has alot more guitar knowledge than me, like you guys n_n Because I may be wrong :O
#2
yeah you can but just make sure you not just ripping of riffs and solos
also dont give up learning songs people like to listen to songs they know

i dont know how long though everyone progresses at a different rate
#3
One of my mates did this. He can shred but can't play chords... in other words, not a very useful guitarist.

You are best served to learn the songs that you like, and learn them back to front. Songs aren't just riffs and solos...

I'm sure you're a very fast learner.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#4
You can do that, that's what I did. It's not bad, but you must always have a couple of songs that you can always play, for me that would be MY OWN songs, so I didn't have to resort to learning others stuff.


Edit: I didn't notice you already know some chords.
Last edited by Zeletros at Aug 6, 2010,
#5
Trust me, do not do this. My friend's guitar playing can be perfectly described as this. Every time he picks up a guitar, he plays that same ****ing riff from Episode 666. EVERY TIME! He is an absolutely worthless guitar player.

Basically, this will determine whether you become a guitar player, or a guitarist. You can be the asshole at the party that plays the same song every time he picks up the guitar, or you can be the guitarist, who writes his own material, and has some musical depth.

Learn your chords, scales, music theory, apply it to the songs you learn how to play, and figure a way to make your own music with it.

You, good sir, have not gone over to your friends house after a hard night of drinking to find 2 dudes passed out in the same room both holding their own flaccid cocks in hand, passed out, with porn on the tv.
#6
It's not a pre-requisite to be able to play through full songs to be able to write your own. However, it's an enjoyable to do and I recommend doing so to some extent. With it comes a sense of completion that doesn't come from just bits and pieces of random riffs and solos. However, not every lick you learn has to be accompanied by a full song. In fact most will probably be learned as standalone, and yes you should be able to write your own songs.

Learn theory, study from the masters, write music. -- they dont all have to be done in that exact order, I'm doing all three on a consistent basis.
#7
I used to sit in front of my computer, using tabs from this website for hours and hours trying to learn my favorite Billy Talent songs. I can definatly say that they payed off. I think you should actually learn and study how to play guitar- but make it fun. Playing guitar shouldn't be work, it should be relaxation time . Try to learn songs you really love. The fact that you love the song will motivate you to learn it. And trust me, alot of great rock riffs can be started while playing someone else's riff. Sometimes, if you feel the riff, you'll find yourself adding things and then you'll be like "hmmm..... what if I added this in?" And pretty soon, you'll have your own killer riff! Good luck, and if you can, try to get a good teacher! They help . When I was 12, my parents got me a real awesome teacher. it put them back by about a grand, but it paid off, because I'm still rocking it 2 years later .
#8
Quote by RisingForce1990
. You can be the asshole at the party that plays the same song every time he picks up the guitar, or you can be the guitarist, who writes his own material, and has some musical depth.

.


Wrong. Nobody at a party wants to listen to your original songs. A musician plays for his audience...and at a party they want songs they know.

There is little more BORING at as party than having to politely listen to some schmuck's original song. It's no the place for it. folks want the familiar that they can sing along with and boogy to.
Last edited by Raptorfingers at Aug 6, 2010,
#9
I didn't say anything about playing originals at a party. People who take the time to write originals would most likely play at an actual venue.

You, good sir, have not gone over to your friends house after a hard night of drinking to find 2 dudes passed out in the same room both holding their own flaccid cocks in hand, passed out, with porn on the tv.
#10
what he is saying is the half-a** player who kinds plays and owns a guitar and stuff but never goes the extra mile. they just pick up a guitar at somebodys house any play a popular riff and say they play guitar.

the difference is, a person who knows how to play and that guy is that if you brough up a tab of say rock you like a hurricane solos (ive recently been obsesed with those solos note for note)....a person who plays can learn the solo in 5 minutes and get it down in a 30 minutes, days, etc (depending on how proficient they are) and the half-a** dude will look like he has never played because he has no skill.

he only has muscle memory for the 2-3 songs he can play well.
#11
Playing is a ever learning deal, You must always learn new tricks and techniques to progress in the art, For writing, Music theory helps, as with dabbling in other music like Classical, Jazz, Blues, Metal, Soul, pop things outside the comfort zone. Rhythm is most important to get down that is where learning songs helps the most. Aim to be able to play along with a track, I also like to just turn on the radio and just try to play with whatever comes on. You have to Crawl before you can run, there is no instant gratification you get what you put into it.
#12
I guess you could, but I think it would be easier to write your own songs (which is what you are eventually aiming to do, right?) if you got some music theory. Knowledge of music theory would make song writing much easier and quicker because most songs are based on certain common structures. You can try to experiment and learn this on your own, but taking a music theory course would probably speed things up quite a bit.

I suggest you take a course in music theory.

ron666