#1
Hey everyone, I'm using an Ibanez RG series to a Toneport UX1, and I record using Reaper and free vsts. My fx chain goes like this GGate>SoloC preamp>Nick Crow's 8505>keFIR(impulse)>4 band eq(to try and bring more treble out). I have a sound clip in my profile, it'll be titled "cool". I'd like to keep some of that deep end bassy tone, but I feel like I have no treble and I can't really make my guitar stand out in the recording. If anyone's heard Sambot's recordings in R&R, I'd like to sound something similar to that. So help me out here, what am I doing wrong?! :P, thanks guys.
#2
You're crazy. The guitar sounds good. If anything I'd back off just a hint on the overdrive/distorsion because once you start to layer and add bass that's going to "wash out" the sense of pitch of the guitars.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

- Huey Lewis & the News
#3
Thanks man, I appreciate that. I'm still in the works of mixing everything together and making it sound good. I still need to add in bass and really just work on mixing in general, so I'll take the distortion tip and make good use of it, thanks.
#4
Ahh to be completely honest with you I think the distortion is sucking away some of your tone.

Try fine tuning that and possibly some compressing I think it would sound good.

I personally would give the guitar more low and maybe mid end, I think it would help.
#5
I think if you back off a little of the gain you'll be in business. Sounded better then I thought it would though! Good job.
Epiphone Dot
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Quote by DaMarsbarPerson
By high-gain I don't mean stupid stuff. I just mean styles like Motley Crue or Iron Maiden
#6
Quote by Funk Monk
Try fine tuning that and possibly some compressing I think it would sound good.

I personally would give the guitar more low and maybe mid end, I think it would help.


Never EVER compress your distorted guitar signal. The signal gets squashed to shit going through the amp or sim. The only time i would recommend it would be lightly compress lead guitars but even that can sound harsh.

One thing that people do not understand is that bass IS 50% OF YOUR GUITAR TONE. High pass your guitars at 100hz and let the bass guitar pick up the low end
5150 III 100W, Mesa 4x12 Cab, Framus Cobra Cab, M-Audio Profire 610, ISA One Pre, SC607-b, Equator D5's, Countryman Type 85 Di box, Radial JCR, Superior Drummer, SSD 4 Ex, TS9, NS-2 and the list goes on and on
#7
Quote by Tig Bitties
Never EVER compress your distorted guitar signal. The signal gets squashed to shit going through the amp or sim. The only time i would recommend it would be lightly compress lead guitars but even that can sound harsh.

One thing that people do not understand is that bass IS 50% OF YOUR GUITAR TONE. High pass your guitars at 100hz and let the bass guitar pick up the low end

Ohhh man what a difference this makes. Your mixes sound way less cluttered when you kill your guitar's non-necessary freqs.
Epiphone Dot
DIY Esquire w/Neovin Power Rock pickup
Vox AC30VR 212
Arion MTE-1 (LED clipping diodes added)
Vox Tonelab LE
Roland SDE1000 delay

Quote by DaMarsbarPerson
By high-gain I don't mean stupid stuff. I just mean styles like Motley Crue or Iron Maiden
#8
Quote by Tig Bitties
Never EVER compress your distorted guitar signal. The signal gets squashed to shit going through the amp or sim. The only time i would recommend it would be lightly compress lead guitars but even that can sound harsh.

One thing that people do not understand is that bass IS 50% OF YOUR GUITAR TONE. High pass your guitars at 100hz and let the bass guitar pick up the low end


This sounds promising. I haven't messed with much of this, anyway you could help me out on how to High pass my guitars? Thanks for the advice everyone!
#9
It actually sounds like a really good mix for just guitar, that is when you'll be adding other instruments. It's a really good base for that, in the end I can see it sounding great.

Quote by HunterRiggs10
I still need to add in bass and really just work on mixing in general,

This will really fill out your tone. Record the bass, compress it pretty heavily (if you use ReaComp as your compressor, the Driving Rock Bass preset is a great start for this). If you've got your guitar tracks normalized, don't be worried if the bass track's fader needs to be about higher than the guitars, that's just the compression. Sometimes it will get above 15db higher than the guitars, but due to the compression, it's actually an even signal.

Quote by Tig Bitties
Never EVER compress your distorted guitar signal. The signal gets squashed to shit going through the amp or sim. The only time i would recommend it would be lightly compress lead guitars but even that can sound harsh.

One thing that people do not understand is that bass IS 50% OF YOUR GUITAR TONE. High pass your guitars at 100hz and let the bass guitar pick up the low end


Quoted For Truth. Though personally, I like to low shelf my guitars to leave some of the bass in them, especially for a the thump of a palm mute. I usually low shelf around 250hz, and boost the bass in the same range that I cut.


Quote by HunterRiggs10
This sounds promising. I haven't messed with much of this, anyway you could help me out on how to High pass my guitars? Thanks for the advice everyone!


Here's how I low-shelf, Tig Bitties could probably give some insight on his high passing methods. http://i35.tinypic.com/a1oho9.jpg

That image is 2 different instances of ReaEQ on my guitar busses (if you don't know Reaper to well, it's for a folder I created which all of my electric guitar tracks are in, so this effect on the bus affects all the guitar tracks at once). The first example is pretty straightforward, the guitars are low-shelfed -3db around 200hz and boosted at 3k. The bass, similarly would be boosted with a low shelf around +3db at 200hz, so it's a total 6db boost, without losing too much relative tone in the bass or guitar. The second example is a song which is driven more by a distorted low end, so I low shelfed much lower, boosted the bass in the guitar to bring out the grit, as well as the thump of a palm-mute, and cut again around 500hz. I boosted the low bass around 100hz, kept it even around 180hz, and brought it up around 500hz and 1k to get some more string thwack to make it more audible. In hindsight, if my bassist had bought his overdrive pedal at the time of this recording, the track's EQ would look a lot more like the first.
Last edited by morrock at Aug 7, 2010,
#10
^ thats similar to what my EQ curves look like as well. for me, the use of low shelf or high pass ends up depending on the song. there are some songs where the guitar really doesnt need any low end. if the song is mostly chord work, with no real palm mutes or anything, i prefer a high pass to keep the low end completly clear. if it ends up with more riffage (especially lower on the neck) i use the low shelf.


i think the biggest problem people who are newer to recording run into is using the same sort of "stock" settings for every recording. i sure as hell know i did when i started out. once you start adding the bass track and getting experience mixing things, you can get past that and it helps a ton. so thats my advice to you Hunter, start with some of the presets and make sure you tweak the heck out of them to suit what you need
#11
Quote by HunterRiggs10
This sounds promising. I haven't messed with much of this, anyway you could help me out on how to High pass my guitars? Thanks for the advice everyone!


Well, anything you record will have a tendency to have unnecessary sub-bass information (just about anything recorded through a mic will have some low-level rumbling from the mic stand for instance). Since it doesn't add anything meaningful to most instruments, bass included, you can high-pass it right off. For bass and kicks you can cut the lows around 70-90Hz using a steep filter (at least 12dB/octave), for guitars it depends a little on the style but for most metal you can cut from 150Hz (and automate a slightly lower cut when the guitar plays by itself). Most pop/rock you can usually cut the guitars at 200Hz or more depending on the other instruments in the mix. There are a lot of frequency range charts that can show you the basic frequency ranges of various instruments.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

- Huey Lewis & the News
#12
Hey everyone, I just thought I'd let you know I've really been taking your advice, and I think I've gotten my guitars to sound a lot better thanks to help of everyone. Once again, I'd just like to thank all the people who took the time to send walls of text to help me out! I have another clip in my profile of a mix to an intro I'm messing with now, feel free to crit/let me know if I improved at all!
#13
Quote by Tig Bitties
Never EVER compress your distorted guitar signal. The signal gets squashed to shit going through the amp or sim. The only time i would recommend it would be lightly compress lead guitars but even that can sound harsh.

One thing that people do not understand is that bass IS 50% OF YOUR GUITAR TONE. High pass your guitars at 100hz and let the bass guitar pick up the low end



I guess I should mention I don't deal with hot signals as much as clean, so I probably shouldn't have given that advice. But my low-end advice still stands. Like this guy said, your bass is a HUGE HUGE portion of your tone, especially if your playing on a lesser distorted signal, although it applies to everything.

So, sorry for the bad compressing advice, i'm still trying to figure out the right applications for it.
#14
Quote by Funk Monk
I guess I should mention I don't deal with hot signals as much as clean, so I probably shouldn't have given that advice. But my low-end advice still stands. Like this guy said, your bass is a HUGE HUGE portion of your tone, especially if your playing on a lesser distorted signal, although it applies to everything.

So, sorry for the bad compressing advice, i'm still trying to figure out the right applications for it.


its all good man. Here is a screen shot i made of a good starting point for really any guitar heavy guitar tone IMO.



Hi pass is when you set up an EQ band that lets everything higher than the frequency you set it at pass through. Low pass is vice versa.

I always start with a EQ on my guitars like this.
-High pass at 100hz
-Low Pass at 10,000hz
-Lower the bandwidth on the low pass to bring back some of the high end you suck out.
-EQ the rest to taste.

It is definetly not something you will not master quick. Always remember, USE YOUR EARS. What works for someone prob is different for you. Different guitars, pickups, amps, mics, preamps, interfaces, DI boxes etc. will have an effect on how and where they EQ out nasty frequencys. Also another thing to remember when EQ'ing guitars is, always cut before you boost. When you boost a frequencys it usually tends to make the tone muddy, boxy or too harsh. Not saying you should never boost guitar frequencys but if you need to boost a frequency more the 2 db then you need to correct it at the source (amp eq etc). I hope this helped someone and have a happy recording!
5150 III 100W, Mesa 4x12 Cab, Framus Cobra Cab, M-Audio Profire 610, ISA One Pre, SC607-b, Equator D5's, Countryman Type 85 Di box, Radial JCR, Superior Drummer, SSD 4 Ex, TS9, NS-2 and the list goes on and on
#16
Quote by ebon00
You're crazy. The guitar sounds good. If anything I'd back off just a hint on the overdrive/distorsion because once you start to layer and add bass that's going to "wash out" the sense of pitch of the guitars.


I agree with this, the guitar tone is crushing good. A tad less gain couldn't hurt, and kudos to you for running a high pass on the guitars, most people don't do that. When you add the bass in there it'll just all fall in place and should work in your favor. If I would tell you to change anything atm, I would take alot of the highs out of the snare on the drums and add some highs to the kick, that snare cuts way too much.

Have you ever tried Ryan's( Catharsis Studios) impulses yet? If you haven't, I would go to the tone testing thread, find the link, download the impulses, which are free, and try them out. I think his impulses are better than the stuff you can buy.
#17
Quote by lurchzilla
Tig Bitties, what DAW are you using in that screenshot?

that would be Reaper. the EQ is just the ReaEQ plugin that comes with reaper, in case you were wondering.
#19
Quote by lurchzilla
Tig Bitties, what DAW are you using in that screenshot?


It is reaper, its a DAW you can download if you google it. Its free to use but you can (and should) but a license for it
5150 III 100W, Mesa 4x12 Cab, Framus Cobra Cab, M-Audio Profire 610, ISA One Pre, SC607-b, Equator D5's, Countryman Type 85 Di box, Radial JCR, Superior Drummer, SSD 4 Ex, TS9, NS-2 and the list goes on and on