#1
Hey guys, I was wondering whether you could help me out.

I'm starting University soon and studying Optometry. Now, I've been wondering whether British Uni degrees would be recognized in North America.

This may be a stupid question, but I've been seriously wondering about this.

I remember watching this documentary about an Indian doctor who moved to Canada and was told there and then that his qualifications didn't count in Canada and that he'd have to do start his education all over again.

Any feedback would be much appreciated guys. Cheers.
#3
It all depends on where and when, often the type of degree too.

Your best bet would be to start asking these questions now to possible employers, if your considering it a long term move.
I know most medical qualifications are registerable over in the US.

I considered it for Paramedics & they said I'd have to take a 2 week drug-name/location course on pay and another fortnight as a 'refresher' for proving my skills, so-to-speak, with another 2 paramedics on duty.
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#4
If I was you I would call the colleges registration to see if they do take your degree. Or that's what I would do :/
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#5
You could do an oversea program with a US school, and earn credits for that school but actually be taking the classes at a school in the UK.
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#6
Yeah, it does count, though the American system is kindof stupid in that for postgraduate study you have to go onto a masters before a phD, regardless of your result. This is because an American degree is less specialised than a British degree, they do basic modules from multiple subjects in first year and have a major and some modules in other subjects in second and third. British degrees do the degree subject and only the degree subject, so you already have more specialist knowledge of your subject than an American graduate has of their major, meaning they need a masters before they have the specialist knowledge needed for a phD, and I don't think having a British degree makes you exempt from that. So while British degrees are accepted in the States, if you're doing a phD I'd recommend not going to the US.
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#7
Quote by Crofty89
Yeah, it does count, though the American system is kindof stupid in that for postgraduate study you have to go onto a masters before a phD, regardless of your result. This is because an American degree is less specialised than a British degree, they do basic modules from multiple subjects in first year and have a major and some modules in other subjects in second and third. British degrees do the degree subject and only the degree subject, so you already have more specialist knowledge of your subject than an American graduate has of their major, meaning they need a masters before they have the specialist knowledge needed for a phD, and I don't think having a British degree makes you exempt from that. So while British degrees are accepted in the States, if you're doing a phD I'd recommend not going to the US.


Yea its just another way for schools to squeeze money out of you.
#8
All right, awesome, cheers!

I'm not really interested in doing a PhD in the states or anything like that, but I would definately consider working there.

I heard something about pharmacists having to do an exam, similarly to doctors.
#9
Quote by Axim Bassist
Yea its just another way for schools to squeeze money out of you.


True, especially considering in the states you pay to do a phD, in the UK more often than not you get paid to do one.

But TS, yeah, if you're going straight into work, then a British degree is fine, and like I said, with some jobs better than an American degree.
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#10
Really? I find it really suprising. I thought they would make it as difficult as possible for foreigners to work in the US.
#11
Like someone said earlier, it varies a little between courses, also PhDs in the states are fairly difficult to get onto, for example despite having a specialised four masters of engineering degree, most american universities only see it as an equivalent to a four year bachelor degree in their system, so when I applied for PhDs in the states it got complicated quickly. However Canada seem a lot more interested in qualification due to its specialism and the fact some universities there offer it too. Best to get in touch with a schools graduate school, or a professor there to ask about it.
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#12
It depends on the employer, and probably the school. I know that it's considered very prestigious for someone to have graduated from Oxford in the UK, so I would assume that means degrees from Oxford, but other than that, I really have no idea.
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#13
Quote by Philip_pepper
Hey guys, I was wondering whether you could help me out.

I'm starting University soon and studying Optometry. Now, I've been wondering whether British Uni degrees would be recognized in North America.

This may be a stupid question, but I've been seriously wondering about this.

I remember watching this documentary about an Indian doctor who moved to Canada and was told there and then that his qualifications didn't count in Canada and that he'd have to do start his education all over again.

Any feedback would be much appreciated guys. Cheers.
If it's the US that interests you, contact the AOA (American Optometric Association)
They can give you specific details.

I don't know if there are different standards in the US and Canada.
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#14
Quote by Philip_pepper
All right, awesome, cheers!

I'm not really interested in doing a PhD in the states or anything like that, but I would definately consider working there.

I heard something about pharmacists having to do an exam, similarly to doctors.
There are a lot of similarities, but the internship is not nearly as rigorous for pharmacists. And yes, there is a certification exam.
Meadows
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#15
Running!


On our way! Hiding!

You will be dyiiiing!


I'm pretty sure if you ask your school they'd have a lot more info on that.
#17
Most professional degrees from the UK are recognized in Canada, Australia and New Zealand (and the reverse).

You will have to pass a one-time exam to be able to achieve certification.
#20
Why do you want to study optometry?
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#21
Ask somebody who has a clue about degrees such as somebody who works for a fucking university, not a bunch of kids who have no idea.
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#22
Quote by Julz127
Why do you want to study optometry?


Because I find it interesting and I wanna work with people on a patient contact level.

And lordofthefood is right
#23
If your degree course was certified/endorsed/approved/whatever by a professional body(like if your professional title is protected, like a dietician), then you may find that you'll have to take an exam set by an equivalent US body in order to practise in the US.