#1
Howdy UG,

Does anyone here know of any design sheets or build guides/schematics for making a Mesa Oversized 4x12 Straight Cabinet?

Thanks in advance UG
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Last edited by Mopy at Aug 6, 2010,
#3
Quote by charles_ebarb
yep. just follow the design of a Marshall 1960TV cab, and use V30's That's what I know about them


Thanks dude, I'll google the schematics for them.
ESP Horizon NT-II
Schecter Hellraiser C-1
Peavey 6505
Orange PPC412
Maxon OD808
ISP Decimator G-String
Boss TU3
#4
I dunno why you'd need the schematic for a cab. Figure out the impedance of the cab, and I'll make a schemo for you.

Unless there's some sort of circuitry in there.

EDIT:

8 ohm impedance= 2 sets of 8 ohm speakers in parallel. Put the two "groups" in series. Both sets make 4 ohm each, and in series that gives 8 ohm.
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Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Aug 6, 2010,
#5
Quote by Spike6sic6
I dunno why you'd need the schematic for a cab. Figure out the impedance of the cab, and I'll make a schemo for you.

Unless there's some sort of circuitry in there.


I pretty much want to make an exact clone (as close as I can possibly make it ) of the Mesa Oversized (Straight) 4x12 Cab. Although, I'm too poor to afford one new/used.
ESP Horizon NT-II
Schecter Hellraiser C-1
Peavey 6505
Orange PPC412
Maxon OD808
ISP Decimator G-String
Boss TU3
#6
Quote by Mopy
I pretty much want to make an exact clone (as close as I can possibly make it ) of the Mesa Oversized (Straight) 4x12 Cab. Although, I'm too poor to afford one new/used.


Can't seem to find to find the impedance of the cab.

Anyways, read my last post. If you need a 16 ohm cab, do exact same thing, BUT with 16 ohm speakers instead.

Cabs are simple. They consist of wires, speakers and an input jack. There might be caps hooked up to the speakers, but that's out of my knowledge.
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You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Aug 6, 2010,
#7
Quote by Spike6sic6
EDIT:

8 ohm impedance= 2 sets of 8 ohm speakers in parallel. Put the two "groups" in series. Both sets make 4 ohm each, and in series that gives 8 ohm.



Generally, cabs are only 8-ohm in stereo. Meaning, there are two sets of 16-ohm speakers in parallel, to form two 8-ohm pairs.

For a 4-ohm cab, you use four 16-ohm speakers in parellel.


For parallel, follow this:

16 + 16 = 8

8 + 8 = 4

4 + 4 = 2

16 + 16 + 16 + 16 = 4 (8 + 8 = 4)

8 + 8 + 8 + 8 = 2 (4 + 4 = 2)

etc.

Basically, in parallel, the total impedance would be half of each speaker.

In series, it's strictly the opposite. Regular math applies.

16 + 16 = 32

8 + 8 = 16

4 + 4 = 8

etc.


Of course, I don't know much more than that, but my sound engineer STRONGLY advises against using speakers in series. I would have to agree with him, because he knows much more than I do.

Also, the Marshall 1960TV cab uses four 8-ohm Celestion Greenback's, not v30's.
I'd have to assume it uses series/parallel wiring that Spike6sic6 referred to:

16 + 16 = 32 (parallel, speakers 1 & 2)
16 + 16 = 32 (parallel, speakers 3 & 4)
32 + 32 = 16 (series, speakers 1 & 2 + 3 & 4)

Something like that, it's a 16-ohm cabinet.

Just for reference, Spike6sic6 said:

8 + 8 = 4 (parallel, speakers 1 & 2)
8 + 8 = 4 (parallel, speakers 3 & 4)
4 + 4 = 8 (series, speakers 1 & 2 + 3 & 4)

Greenback's are QUITE pricey. You might want to try Eminence speakers (They sound better & are MUCH cheaper, plus have a very wide selection that can fit the bill of almost any style) and do a regular parallel circuit. Try to shoot for four 16 ohm speakers, most amps have a 4-ohm output. If the amp you're using doesn't have one, just use the math I gave you above or ask me if you need help matching up impedance.

EDIT:

Caps are used to block out certain frequencies. Not really used much in guitar cabs, mainly in bi- and tri-amped PA cabinets. At least as far as I know.
Quote by Steve46
thanks alot ice condition!! your the breast!


The best bosom in all of UG.
Last edited by ice condition at Aug 7, 2010,
#8
Quote by ice condition
Generally, cabs are only 8-ohm in stereo. Meaning, there are two sets of 16-ohm speakers in parallel, to form two 8-ohm pairs.

For a 4-ohm cab, you use four 16-ohm speakers in parellel.


For parallel, follow this:

16 + 16 = 8

8 + 8 = 4

4 + 4 = 2

16 + 16 + 16 + 16 = 4 (8 + 8 = 4)

8 + 8 + 8 + 8 = 2 (4 + 4 = 2)

etc.

Basically, in parallel, the total impedance would be half of each speaker.

In series, it's strictly the opposite. Regular math applies.

16 + 16 = 32

8 + 8 = 16

4 + 4 = 8

etc.


Of course, I don't know much more than that, but my sound engineer STRONGLY advises against using speakers in series. I would have to agree with him, because he knows much more than I do.

Also, the Marshall 1960TV cab uses four 8-ohm Celestion Greenback's, not v30's.
I'd have to assume it uses series/parallel wiring that Spike6sic6 referred to:

16 + 16 = 32 (parallel, speakers 1 & 2)
16 + 16 = 32 (parallel, speakers 3 & 4)
32 + 32 = 16 (series, speakers 1 & 2 + 3 & 4)

Something like that, it's a 16-ohm cabinet.

Just for reference, Spike6sic6 said:

8 + 8 = 4 (parallel, speakers 1 & 2)
8 + 8 = 4 (parallel, speakers 3 & 4)
4 + 4 = 8 (series, speakers 1 & 2 + 3 & 4)

Greenback's are QUITE pricey. You might want to try Eminence speakers (They sound better & are MUCH cheaper, plus have a very wide selection that can fit the bill of almost any style) and do a regular parallel circuit. Try to shoot for four 16 ohm speakers, most amps have a 4-ohm output. If the amp you're using doesn't have one, just use the math I gave you above or ask me if you need help matching up impedance.

EDIT:

Caps are used to block out certain frequencies. Not really used much in guitar cabs, mainly in bi- and tri-amped PA cabinets. At least as far as I know.


Didn't know about the cab impedance thing. Thanks for the info. My school is not about guitar audio, but about electronics in general, so there's some stuff I do not know. And don't worry about the maths, I know it all .

As for avoiding using speakers in series, you might be right, but it's impossible in a 16ohm cab. The set-up I advised ensure that every speaker in the cab deliver at the same "volume". If his cab is gonna be 4 ohm you're right. Thing is if you want 16 ohm, using only parallel is impossible. For such a "high" impedance, you NEED to have some stuff in series. You can't hook up 4x 64 ohm speakers in parallel, simply cause they do not exist. Even 2x 32 ohm is impossible. In this situation, you basicly have to use the set-up I gave. Unless you start adding coils in there to tweak the impedance, but that's not recommendable. It will affect your sound, and anyways it's too much trouble.

As for capacitors, they have various uses. In audio they pretty much only act as filters(blocking/letting pass certain frequencies). Usually when you're building something with a speaker, you do not add any. If you notice noises, you add one to the speaker itself to filter the unwanted noise. You can also just experiment, to change your sound. Since it filters frequencies, it affects your low/high/mids.
Quote by MH400
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You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#9
Well, the math's were more so the TS understood how everything worked


Also, speakers would still work at an equal volume as long as you didn't mix and match different impedance speakers. Not to contradict what you said, of course, but you don't necessarily need a 16-ohm 4x12 unless the transformer in your amp is wired only to use a 16-ohm output (which I would think unlikely). Though I'm sure TS has enough info for his cab without us getting into an argument about such silly things.

I don't know much about caps (or really any electronics) other than guitar's and some in amps. So you've got me there.
Quote by Steve46
thanks alot ice condition!! your the breast!


The best bosom in all of UG.
#10
Yeah, I'm not saying he HAS to use a 16 ohm. And they could vary in wattage/volume, depending on how they're set up.

If they're all in parallel, or all in series, or as like I told TS to do, it will all be equal. It will start being unequal if he uses weird wirings, like 1 speaker in parallel with 2 speakers that are in series, and such. Say he has a 16 ohm speaker in parallel with 2x 16 ohm in series. That would give him 16 and 8 ohm in parallel. The current going through the 8 ohm part will be higher, which will make it unequal.

If TS uses the method I gave him, or all in parallel like you said, it will all be good .
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#11
I'd just make a multi purpose cab.

You could wire it up so you have a switch to go between series and parallel so you could have one with one impedance and one with another.

Or just have it wired up with a couple different input jacks, one goes to parallel wiring and one goes to series.

That way you can plug in any head to your one cab
#12
Quote by Spike6sic6
I dunno why you'd need the schematic for a cab. Figure out the impedance of the cab, and I'll make a schemo for you.

Unless there's some sort of circuitry in there.

EDIT:

8 ohm impedance= 2 sets of 8 ohm speakers in parallel. Put the two "groups" in series. Both sets make 4 ohm each, and in series that gives 8 ohm.
Spike, I think TS could have meant dimensional drawings (blueprints) when he said "schematics". The term isn't reserved only for electronic diagrams.
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#13
Quote by dougl126
I'd just make a multi purpose cab.

You could wire it up so you have a switch to go between series and parallel so you could have one with one impedance and one with another.

Or just have it wired up with a couple different input jacks, one goes to parallel wiring and one goes to series.

That way you can plug in any head to your one cab


Definatly possible, but the switching thing could get a bit complex. I'd stick with a simple cab, personnally.

Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Spike, I think TS could have meant dimensional drawings (blueprints) when he said "schematics". The term isn't reserved only for electronic diagrams.


True, didn't think about that. It's just the word schematic is so familiar to me I usually associate it with electronics .

TS should clear us up and what kind of info he's looking for. If it's about the electric part of it, tell us the impedance you want, and we'll give a straight answer.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Aug 7, 2010,
#14
Quote by Spike6sic6
Definatly possible, but the switching thing could get a bit complex. I'd stick with a simple cab, personnally.

.


Here

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=guitar+amp+handbook

I googled it, now if you go to google books, you can preview the book.

Go to page 173, it shows you the plans.
#15
Quote by dougl126
Here

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=guitar+amp+handbook

I googled it, now if you go to google books, you can preview the book.

Go to page 173, it shows you the plans.


Too lazy to go check .

The point isn't that it's very hard. It's just for someone who doesn't know much about electronics, it can be complex to figure out.

Now with steps and a schematic, it's a different story. If you can avoid wasting your time figuring it out yourself, go for it.

I could come up with a schematic and all, I'll just be honest and tell you; I'm just too lazy to do it for someone over the web, for free .
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.