#1
Well I have learnt these 5 positions and feel that I am now getting a bit faster when I practise them each day but what i'd like to know is

1) what can I do to improve i.e do I need to start just combining all these notes in different orders (rather than just playing them in order from 6th to 1st string and back again) and notes from different positions, I know some do overlap.

2) Say someone was doing a solo, would they do this over someone else playing chords, and if so what chords. I assume you can't just do a solo over any chord.

Thanks
#2
1. correct.

2. You can do a solo over any chords, a solo in which you'd play over A minor pentatonic would have to be played over a chordprogression in the key of A - say a 12 bar blues:
A | A | A | A |
D | D | A | A |
E| D | A | A |

Where each chord is played a 4 quarters.

Edit: A good tip on how to spice the solo up in the beginning, is to take the notes in the chords and land on them when changing to that specific chord.
Last edited by cheesecakes4 at Aug 7, 2010,
#3
^ Also learn to connect your shapes up and down the neck in your box patterns. If you know the 5 shapes then you can start seeing their connecting points and meshing them all together.
#4
try some 3 notes per string exercises
bending up to the next note in a different position
if you use a trem try the reverse of the above with a dive, if the trem floats you can try a pull up.
tapping notes from 1 postition into another

there loads that you can do which applies to every scale you are going to learn.

also start transposing these shapes into the different keys

in terms of what chords you can use with this scale, look at the notes of the scale (ACDEG)
#5
Quote by ibanezgod1973
try some 3 notes per string exercises
bending up to the next note in a different position


So if I am bending up to the next note, I have to make sure that the note I am bending up to is part of the scale also?

Thanks for all the advice - I will start combining them all together now then
#6
Quote by Lucylou
So if I am bending up to the next note, I have to make sure that the note I am bending up to is part of the scale also?

Thanks for all the advice - I will start combining them all together now then


for the purposes of the excercise yes,

you don`t neccessarily have to bend up a whole step to the next note, blues playing depends alot on 1/4 step bends

it will also help you later when you start using advanced stuff, such as pitch axis theory, but don`t worry about that yet
#7
Quote by cheesecakes4
1. correct.

2. You can do a solo over any chords, a solo in which you'd play over A minor pentatonic would have to be played over a chordprogression in the key of A - say a 12 bar blues:
A | A | A | A |
D | D | A | A |
E| D | A | A |

Where each chord is played a 4 quarters.

Edit: A good tip on how to spice the solo up in the beginning, is to take the notes in the chords and land on them when changing to that specific chord.

shouldnt it be in A minor, not A major?

also, yes, just start mixing it up and playing random notes and decide what sounds good
#8
Oh Ok then thanks and one more thing while we're on the subject! What about those notes that are part of the scale notes for A minor pentatonic, but which come before the fifth fret? Because can I not use notes on frets 1,2,3 and 4 also as long as they fit the scale? I hope that makes sense!
#9
The frets are pretty much irrlelevant, as are the positions really - all that technically matters is the notes themselves. The A minor pentatonic scale is the notes A C D E G - the scale is simply anywhere you can find those notes on your guitar.
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