#1
For some reason, even though everybody I know says bass is easier, I'm a much better guitarist than bassist. I have a lot of problems learning covers because there's often a bassline that won't repeat, you know what I mean? Like a bassline that I can't memorize because it'll keep changing. I have 1 book ("progressive rock bass"), and I've learned a bit from my friends who play. The basslines I write usually aren't that creative, and I don't have very good control with my right hand when playing.

I was thinking the best thing to do is to go back to the basics, which I mostly skipped thinking my knowledge of theory and bass technique was "good enough for now." Can anyone recommend books or anything? What did you guys do when you began to learn the bass?
#2
i play guitar mainly but i had to pick up a bass for a gig. to help me with bass i just looked at some of my favorite bands and followed how they bassists played. i played with pick because plucking and playing slap are overrated and using a pick i think is more suffiecient. and really playing stuff you enjoy helps. using tabs help obviously and playing simple stuff first is important. playing stuff like metal or like geddy lee style is more advanced
#3
The first suggestion I have is to not follow tabs while playing. Get a good idea of the song structure through a few look overs, then look specifically on how that artist makes fills and transitions. Then ad lib these things together. That is just for playing other people's songs. For your own basslines, find shapes that you can always come back to (similar to how some guitarists have specific solo boxes that they'll hop into when they aren't sure what to do). Play with a drummer. Play with a drummer. Playing with drummers is my favorite thing to experiment with (my favorite drummer to play with is my friend's dad, who has been a jazz drummer for at least 30 years. I usually play post-rock type stuff over what he does, but sometimes we do jazzy or bluesy walks). Play notes based on what he is playing (accent certain instruments he is using). Part of how you can make fills is based on how the drummer does fills. Nothing is tighter than you and the drummer doing fills that are based off of each other's.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#4
Quote by lordofthefood1
The first suggestion I have is to not follow tabs while playing. Get a good idea of the song structure through a few look overs, then look specifically on how that artist makes fills and transitions. Then ad lib these things together. That is just for playing other people's songs. For your own basslines, find shapes that you can always come back to (similar to how some guitarists have specific solo boxes that they'll hop into when they aren't sure what to do). Play with a drummer. Play with a drummer. Playing with drummers is my favorite thing to experiment with (my favorite drummer to play with is my friend's dad, who has been a jazz drummer for at least 30 years. I usually play post-rock type stuff over what he does, but sometimes we do jazzy or bluesy walks). Play notes based on what he is playing (accent certain instruments he is using). Part of how you can make fills is based on how the drummer does fills. Nothing is tighter than you and the drummer doing fills that are based off of each other's.

I've been playing drums for a few years, first instrument (or collection of instruments) I learned and still my favorite, do you think comparing my drumming to my bass-playing would help?
#5
I guess it might a little bit, but it really needs to be a live drummer so you can play off each other.

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#6
i think you should try and incorperate some of the rhythmic aspects of drumming into your basslines.
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#7
Quote by TMVATDI
I've been playing drums for a few years, first instrument (or collection of instruments) I learned and still my favorite, do you think comparing my drumming to my bass-playing would help?

yes yes yes.

Again, a live drummer is better because, well, not everybody plays drums the same. However, having the knowledge of drumming should help immensely with bass. This is basically for bassline structure, not like scales or note intervals or anything. Think of what you would be drumming at the part and play pattern on the bass.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#8
Quote by lordofthefood1
yes yes yes.

Again, a live drummer is better because, well, not everybody plays drums the same. However, having the knowledge of drumming should help immensely with bass. This is basically for bassline structure, not like scales or note intervals or anything. Think of what you would be drumming at the part and play pattern on the bass.

that makes sense, and it especially works for me cuz i compose all the music for my band on almost all the instruments so i always know what the drums will be doing, unless we're improvising