#1
Now I KNOW that I could just work them out, but I'm pretty sure that there aren't that many actually playable time sigs that don't sound like rubbish.

It's just I want to write a song which uses as many as possible but I want something that is going to sound good.

So does anyone know where I might be able to find a list of all the major playable time signatures? Done a few searches but came up with nothing.
#2
wat
get your hands out your pockets and your finger on the trigger
let one fly
we don't die
we multiply
throw your set up in the sky.
#3
any time sig you could think of is technically playable.

/thread
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#5
Oh guys don't forget 234918/51234
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#6
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Oh guys don't forget 234918/51234

Still playable!

That would be "234918 beats, with each beat being a 51234th of the current beat". It'll probably be very interesting xD
#9
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Still playable!

That would be "234918 beats, with each beat being a 51234th of the current beat". It'll probably be very interesting xD

k, im sorry for being the stupidest person on this site, but i must ask my stupid questions, how do we know what the "current beat" is? like if i write in 4/4 i just think of it as 4 quarter notes, not 4 beats, each being a 4th of the current beat, cuz i wouldnt know what the current beat is, can i get some help understanding that?
#10
My understanding of time signatures is that the top note is the number of beats per measure and the bottom note is what type of note gets one beat. So 3/4 would be three beats per measure, each quarter note counting as one beat.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#11
Quote by FacetOfChaos
My understanding of time signatures is that the top note is the number of beats per measure and the bottom note is what type of note gets one beat. So 3/4 would be three beats per measure, each quarter note counting as one beat.

thats how i was taught too, but apparently thats just for the "ease of use" and the bottom number is actually that note with a dot, so if its 8/8, its 8 beats, and the dotted 8th note gets the beat.
#12
n = 1
b = 1

n/b

To your liking:
n+x/b*2^y

That's not including irrational time signatures. Have fun!
#13
Quote by TMVATDI
k, im sorry for being the stupidest person on this site, but i must ask my stupid questions, how do we know what the "current beat" is? like if i write in 4/4 i just think of it as 4 quarter notes, not 4 beats, each being a 4th of the current beat, cuz i wouldnt know what the current beat is, can i get some help understanding that?

It does work that way... for all simple and compound sigs.

An irrational time sig (like 234918/51234 and 6/3 or 8/5) works by having the bottom number being how much you divide the original beat, and the top number still being the number of beats.
#15
*looks at OP*

What is this I dont even-

This thread is just made of fail. Fail, aidz, and cancer. Ive never had to say that about any MT thread until today

TS, any time signature can sound good. Ive seen 3/1 and it sounded good. Ive seen 15/16 that sounded good. Ive seen more odd time signatures and mixed meter music than I care to think about and it all sounded good. And thats just using traditional notation. Once you get into contemporary classical notation, you will see things in your stave that you didnt know could even exist in regards to time. Like...things that cannot even be explained in this thread.

Before I go on ranting, do whatever you want. Barlines and time signatures mean nothing
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Aug 8, 2010,
#16
Quote by TMVATDI
thats how i was taught too, but apparently thats just for the "ease of use" and the bottom number is actually that note with a dot, so if its 8/8, its 8 beats, and the dotted 8th note gets the beat.

Kind of.

In Compound sigs (anything with an 8 on the bottom) the dotted quarter gets the beat. In 6/8, there'd be 2 beats and in 9/8 there'd be 3.

In Simple sigs (anything with a 4 under it) the quarter gets the beat. So in 4/4 there'd be 4 beats and in 3/4 there'd be 3.

If a 16 is on the bottom, the dotted 8th gets the beat. If a 32, the dotted 16th. So on and so forth.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Aug 9, 2010,
#17
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Kind of.

In Compound sigs (anything with an 8 on the bottom) the dotted quarter gets the beat. In 6/8, there'd be 2 beats and in 9/8 there'd be 3.

In Simple sigs (anything with a 4 under it) the quarter gets the beat. So in 4/4 there'd be 4 beats and in 3/4 there'd be 3.

If a 16 is on the bottom, the dotted 8th gets the beat. If a 32, the dotted 16th. So on and so forth.

oh, ok, that...kind of...makes sense. i mean i understand how it works i just dont understand the meaning of it, i guess it has to do with natural accents. so, in irrational time signatures, you have to change to an irrational signature partway thru the song, it cant be the original time signature, because its a division of the original one, right??
#18
Quote by TMVATDI
oh, ok, that...kind of...makes sense. i mean i understand how it works i just dont understand the meaning of it, i guess it has to do with natural accents.


Yup. A 3-eighth-note lick just naturally has the accents on every 3rd eighth note. Likewise, a 4 quarter note lick will naturally have the accents on every quarter.

so, in irrational time signatures, you have to change to an irrational signature partway thru the song, it cant be the original time signature, because its a division of the original one, right??

You've got it. They're very rarely used and were a product of 20th century compositional techniques. If I remember, Dvorak used them some, but I'm not too sure. I've never heard anything that has, but I've used some myself (simple things like 5/3 or 7/5).
#19
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Yup. A 3-eighth-note lick just naturally has the accents on every 3rd eighth note. Likewise, a 4 quarter note lick will naturally have the accents on every quarter.


You've got it. They're very rarely used and were a product of 20th century compositional techniques. If I remember, Dvorak used them some, but I'm not too sure. I've never heard anything that has, but I've used some myself (simple things like 5/3 or 7/5).

oh ok, cool i think i understand time signatures now!
thanks!