#1
Ok I'm trying for a layed effect so if someone plays an open chord is there a rule of thumb as to where to put a capo to accent the cord......if I play a G where would I put the capo to get another G ? Clear as mud right?
#2
If you are in open "G", another open "G" would be available at the 12th fret.

Each fret raises the tone by 1/2 tone.
#3
Yes. 1 octave is 12 frets. Or, you can put it on the 5th fret, and the fingering of a C will sound like a G, and so on.

You can play Here Comes The Sun with your capo on the 7th fret. It's a beautiful song.
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"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

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#4
You could put the capo on 7 and play the same progression in C instead of G and that would get you what you are looking for.

Basically find a chord you want to play to match then G and then move your capo up until the capo'd chord matches your chosen chord. That's a terrible way to explain it, sorry.

If you take C, for example. Putting a capo on the 2nd fret makes it D. 4th fret makes it E. 6th fret F# and the 7th G. Your key of "C" shapes are now in reality the key of G
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