Poll: Destructive or constructive?
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View poll results: Destructive or constructive?
Destructive
1 3%
constructive
39 98%
Voters: 40.
#1
i am thinking of getting an electronic tuner but a guy i know (who btw always tries to one-up me) says that they are destructive t talent since they encourage spoonfeeding. is it true. what is you opinion guys?
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#2
Having an electric tuner is like using spellcheck. It will reinforce positive behavior while ensuring for the immediate time you are doing things correctly.
#3
It really depends on the context, I think. If you are trying to develop a good ear then maybe a little destructive. IMHO there are much better ways to develop one, plus its hard to get perfectly in tune unless you have a reference note. It doesn't make you better technicality, expressively, or creatively. So maybe just don't care? Unless your always trying to one-up him. If not then is shouldn't matter.
#4
I think they are something detrimental to your ear-training if you primarily use them, but I see nothing wrong with them. If you want to tune more accurately than your ear can then you can use them. However I do recommend owning one especially for restringing your guitar. I have a digital metronome that has an option to sound any of the 12 pitches which can be really useful if you want to tune to the approximate range of the string before you start actually tuning it, and it is more beneficial to your ear training (of course buying a tuner that only has this option and not the "frequency arrow" is pointless as you can just use your computer for that, however that doesn't make it any less useful). You also need to make sure one of the strings is precisely tuned, otherwise tuning by ear is not going to yield any results.
#5
Some of these answers are ridiculous. If I had only one guitar pedal to choose from, it would be my tuner pedal.

A tuner is required to tune your guitar quickly and effectively. I regard it as a necessary part of my rig on stage because sometimes you'll have to tune your guitar between or even during songs.

I could learn to pick the tone precisely by ear, but for those high pressure situations where there's a time limit, an electronic tuner is a must. If you don't own one, buy one. In other situations too, such as a band situation, I'd much rather everyone refer to their own tuners than spend time trying to get the right pitch by ear.
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#6
I think they are a "must have" piece of gear. I don't always use it. I can get by just fine by ear, given a reference pitch.

But if I'm recording, especially, I want to use the electronic tuner to be *really* sure that I'm *really* on the mark.

They are also *very* useful if you are trying to set up your own intonation.

The BEST way to train your ear is to learn to sing.

CT
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#7
It's a device that helps you.

Without it wouldn't actually know what A-G actually sounds like - not to mention my guitar would of sounded shit when i first learnt.

By playing with the tuner i learnt the notes with my ear.
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#8
When you start getting into extended range guitars with locking nuts and fine tuners, you really don't want to waste your time tuning WITHOUT an electronic tuner. I'll shoot myself before I ever willingly tune without one.
#9
nope, not destructive at all: it'll help you to develop a good ear:

if you start playing with your guitar perfectly in tune everytime, you'll notice something is off more quickly then when the tuning is a bit off here and there,
which you can check with the tuner, then tune by ear till the point you think its spot on and then check if it ACTUALLY is spot on, if not, adjust it further



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#10
Quote by Dayn
When you start getting into extended range guitars with locking nuts and fine tuners, you really don't want to waste your time tuning WITHOUT an electronic tuner. I'll shoot myself before I ever willingly tune without one.


1+ particularly when the string your using as a reference point can change if you adjust the other strings its just not worth it.
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#11
Considering if you play while your guitar isn't properly in tune your ear for the notes will get worse, I am going to say constructive. It's not like virtuoso pianists all tune their pianos themselves or anything (if that is a decent correlation)
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#12
When I watch a band i don't want to wait around listening to them pissing around tuning up - a pedal tuner allows you to tune quickly and silently.
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#13
if you play with you guitar out of tune it will be even more destructive
#14
Tuners are certainly not a bad thing. As many people have pointed out, in many situations being able to tune quickly and accurately is a necessity.

However, you definitely should be able to tune without accurately without a tuner. I suggest that when you are practicing you try and tune without a tuner. Then when you think it's in tune you can check with the tuner and adjust if necessary. This way you learn how to tune but also never have to play with an out of tune guitar.
#15
Quote by padfootpak
i am thinking of getting an electronic tuner but a guy i know (who btw always tries to one-up me) says that they are destructive t talent since they encourage spoonfeeding. is it true. what is you opinion guys?


No, it's not true.

Ignore elitists. What they say only serves one purpose..... to make themselves appear elite.
shred is gaudy music
#16
A valuable tool that's more likely to help you develop your ear than make it lazy.
#17
You need it if you're going to record, play live, and it's just generally a good idea to have one. especially if you're singing or playing with a singer.
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#18
Quote by padfootpak
i am thinking of getting an electronic tuner but a guy i know (who btw always tries to one-up me) says that they are destructive t talent since they encourage spoonfeeding. is it true. what is you opinion guys?

yes and no. kind of a stupid thing to say actually. they dont force people to do anything. you have to make the effort. perhaps just use it to find the low E and tune up from there. if you do your own intonation set up, you will need a tuner unless you have perfect pitch.

i have one but i hardly use it. i find they never get the guitar totally in tune. the guitar isnt a perfect beast. if you tune up, some chords may be slightly out. so usually i tune by ear to try and even everything out better. unfortunatly, this means getting it right means the tuner is almost useless.so again, i really only use it for intonation set ups and low E if im out. usually though i can tune close to E from memory (well Eb actually).
#19
awesome, not a single negative thing about common sense in this thread. no bickering, no arguments..... no mode questions. it's moments like this that i enjoy being in MT

so yeah, i concur with everyone else. i personally ALWAYS use a tuner if i haven't played a guitar in a while to make sure it didn't fall a quarter step flat in its entirety (you'd be surprised how often this has happened) but generally if im playing a guitar consistently then i can tell when a string or 2 is out. i use natural harmonics to tune as i find if you have a good ear they are as precise as any expensive electronic tuner. but i do use an electronic tuner for my low E. i do also generally double check my harmonic tuning to make sure it reads out right on an electronic tuner.

useless side note - for about the first 4 years of my playing i never consistently had a tuner but i did always have a copy of the black album and i knew the first note of nothing else matters was a low E. i tuned up from there
Last edited by z4twenny at Aug 9, 2010,
#20
Quote by z4twenny
..... no mode questions.



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
Your friend is a retard. I have never met a single successful musician that didnt own a towner. Most of them use the korg chromatic one. Although lots of guitarists and bassists use pedal tuners. But that doesnt matter. What matters is that your friend is impossibly stupid
#22
Tuners are effective for tuning, but once your guitar is in tune, it's up to YOU to make sure you stay in tune. Just because the strings are in tune doesn't mean you can't press the frets too hard and make everything you play slightly sharp.
#23
Quote by GuitarMunky
No, it's not true.

Ignore elitists. What they say only serves one purpose..... to make themselves appear elite.


+1

A real guitarist does it by taking an accurate measurement of the vibrations of the strings with a ruler and a stop watch, and with the help of a graphing calculator, makes the necessary calculations to determine the frequency of the string. Then s/he adjusts accordingly.
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#24
Quote by Eastwinn
+1

A real guitarist does it by taking an accurate measurement of the vibrations of the strings with a ruler and a stop watch, and with the help of a graphing calculator, makes the necessary calculations to determine the frequency of the string. Then s/he adjusts accordingly.


Love your scientific and real approach.
Quote by Maynard James Keenan


Cold silence has a tendency to atrophy any sense of compassion