#1
Hey guys how you all doing.

So I've been practicing scales A minor/C major and I know them so good now that I can see the notes on my fretboard without having to think about it. But now I want to move it a step up to A# minor/C# major. So my question is how do you practice a key. I mean do you just move the pattern or do it 1 note after the other. Whats your take on this? Im trying to move the pattern but it just knocks me off on the other root notes.

Sincerely

ATC
#4
Quote by 12345abcd3
Learn the notes of the fretboard + learn the notes each key.

Not the easiest way but by far the most useful.


I know the notes on the fretboard, in a split second I can say what note it is. But isnt it better to just see what notes there are in a D major scale for instance and just remember them and play. I mean I know where the notes are and if I just remember the notes of the D major I should be able to play it. I'll try.

Thanks for helping by the way.
#5
Quote by 12345abcd3
Learn the notes of the fretboard + learn the notes each key.

Not the easiest way but by far the most useful.
I would suggest this. Once you learn all the notes on the fretboard by heart you will see a gateway of music theory and applying it to your guitar. It doesn't just help with scales, it helps with chords as well (probably more but I don't feel like looking it up).

Say the notes as you play them, go up and down the scale saying the notes. Once you are comfortable with that key start breaking out of the "boxes" if you are using that manner of learning scales that is. If you feel you have that scale downpat move on to the next key and repeat. This is how I'm currently learning scales and its effective, in my opinion that is. Find which ever way you believe is best for you though.

EDIT:
Quote by AxeThrowingCow
I know the notes on the fretboard, in a split second I can say what note it is. But isnt it better to just see what notes there are in a D major scale for instance and just remember them and play. I mean I know where the notes are and if I just remember the notes of the D major I should be able to play it. I'll try.

Thanks for helping by the way.
You can learn it that way as well. Memorize the notes of each key in the Major Scale. Surprisingly its not too difficult since its a heptonic scale and uses 7 notes per octave. Anyways this is more of the pianist approach to learning scales, but you can apply it to guitar as well.
I iz moderatin teh forums on this site.
Last edited by 7grant2 at Aug 9, 2010,
#6
Learn them with "the circle of fifths". First, study the Cmaj scale on the whole fretboard and then move on to the next scale in the circle that has only one sharp note and so on.
#7
Quick tip: don't learn the notes of the key. Learn the notes that are altered in the key. For instance, go from C Major to G Major. It's not ANY different, other than you now have an F#. Just visualize, on your fretboard, where the C Major scale is, now raise the F's a half-step. You've now got G Major. But learn them in the order of the Co5's. Why? It makes it VERY easy to remember which notes are altered and which aren't.

For a good lesson on the Co5's, check my blog.
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Quick tip: don't learn the notes of the key. Learn the notes that are altered in the key. For instance, go from C Major to G Major. It's not ANY different, other than you now have an F#. Just visualize, on your fretboard, where the C Major scale is, now raise the F's a half-step. You've now got G Major. But learn them in the order of the Co5's. Why? It makes it VERY easy to remember which notes are altered and which aren't.

For a good lesson on the Co5's, check my blog.


Cool stuff, thank you everybody for the help. Much appreciated.
#9
I would suggest spending time away from the instrument. Sounds like you have the technique but the brain isn't quite keeping up at this stage.

Can you for instance say all the note names of Ab major out loud, quickly and in time? Practice saying the notes of all keys/scales when away from the instrument. It'll save you loads of time when you've got the instrument in front of you
#10
Quote by -Mantra-
Learn them with "the circle of fifths". First, study the Cmaj scale on the whole fretboard and then move on to the next scale in the circle that has only one sharp note and so on.


I'd definitley second this. Working up from C (adding sharps) and work down from C with the flats. But also practice the relevant minor of the key you're in aswell.
#11
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Quick tip: don't learn the notes of the key. Learn the notes that are altered in the key. For instance, go from C Major to G Major. It's not ANY different, other than you now have an F#. Just visualize, on your fretboard, where the C Major scale is, now raise the F's a half-step. You've now got G Major. But learn them in the order of the Co5's. Why? It makes it VERY easy to remember which notes are altered and which aren't.
+1

In fact, you can go even further. All you have to remember is the order of sharps:

F C G D A E B

This is the order in which flats are added as you go round the circle of fifths. Once you know this simple order all you have to know is the number of sharps in a key. For example, you can just think "E major - 4 sharps" then you know that the sharps in E major are F, C, G and D because they are the first 4 notes in the list.

For flats it works exactly the same way except the order is reversed. So all you have to remember is "Bb major - 2 flats" and you know that the two flats are B and E.

The mnemonic I used to use (the order is now permenantly ingrained into my memory) is "Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle", which is the order of the sharps. This one is nice because it can be reversed to get the order of the flats: "Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father".
#12
You have a godly user name.
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#14
This is an open reply to those advocating "learning the notes":

The OP simply wants a way to move what has already been learned up or down the fretboard. It is not about learning new scales. While I do not see any "harm" in learning more theory, much of playing involves muscle memory. I know when I play patterns based on scales, I play them faster than I can intellectually "process" what notes I am playing. At least this fits my style of playing-- where I am generally more concerned with intervals, for example.

It is like speaking. When most of us communicate, we do not "think" word-word-word-word. We think about ideas and speak in phrases or sentences. Same when we read--- we generally read multiple words at once-- we certainly do not read character by character. Of course you might argue that at some point we all had to learn the alphabet, but I suggest that learning the names of notes is rather arbitrary when compared to learning the intervals.

My point, you really do not need to know the names of notes to transpose from A to A# unless you want to learn to play from chord charts. The scale has exactly the same intervals. I don't really see how it will help the OP while actually playing.

At least to me, this is a big part of the appeal of playing guitar. I don't need to deal with "black keys and white keys" as on a keyboard (and drilling on learning chords and scales in different keys). Transposition is almost effortless if I am not dealing with open chords (and even then, you can always cheat with a capo).

Finally, if I want to change from A minor to A dorian, I know I just need the notes to G major (which I visualize as the intervals that change from the A minor scale: w-h-w-w-w-h-w). Again--- it is about intervals and burning them into the muscles. If I can play A dorian I can just as easily play G or D dorian...


....just one person's opinion....
#15
I'm actually surprised that nobody has said "move it up one fret".

So I'll say it.

Move it up one fret
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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