#1
I think this thread is the right place, as a guitar is a gear, and I am modding mine. Please move it, though, it it isn't.

So, how likely is it that all the frets will be level after putitng them in? I'm using 6105 Stainless fretwire from Warmough.com, and I put a black line from a sharpie across the top of every fret so that I could see which ones were low. Only thing is, none of them were low. I htink.

Did I miss something? Should I file them all down anyway, even though they seem to all be the same heigth?
#3
Quote by The Hunger
I think this thread is the right place, as a guitar is a gear, and I am modding mine. Please move it, though, it it isn't.
You're in the right place.

Quote by The Hunger
So, how likely is it that all the frets will be level after putitng them in? I'm using 6105 Stainless fretwire from Warmough.com, and I put a black line from a sharpie across the top of every fret so that I could see which ones were low. Only thing is, none of them were low. I htink.

Did I miss something? Should I file them all down anyway, even though they seem to all be the same heigth?
Putting a line with a sharpie on the fret is a good first step. Then take a large, flat, fine sharpening stone that will bridge across several frets at once. Lightly polish the frets, working your working your way from one end of the fretboard to the other. If a line of clean metal without marker, shows at the top of each fret, you're done!

If any of the frets still have marking at the very top without a line of clean metal showing, you have more work to do. The frets with marker still at the very top are lower than their neighbors.

Simple enough?


Of course we haven't mentioned dressing the ends of the frets and beveling the corners, but you probably know to do that.
Meadows
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Last edited by SomeoneYouKnew at Aug 9, 2010,
#4
I actually already dressed the ends of the frets, so that's done.

What I did was I taped some 600 grit wet and dry sandpaper to a metal block that was about 6 inches long or so. I used that to check to see how level the frets were.

I just wnat to make sure that there's not somehting else I need to do before I get it back together.
#5
No if your not ending up with any places where sharpie is left after running you leveler then your fine. Sometimes you end up with a low fret depending on the fretboard, sometimes they work out real nice without alot of trouble.

Fun part is polishing them now. All I ever use is stainless and steel wool that works fine on regular frets wont do much at all to stainless. Its pain but I go over the tops where you cut with the 600 grit with thin strips of 1500 grit sandpaper. Tape off the fretboard to save yourself some cursing.
#7
Quote by The Hunger
what is the advantage of polishing them?
The smoother the surface of the fret, the more effortless it will be when you bend your stings. Highly polished frets are like sex.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#9
Quote by The Hunger
And un-polished frets are just like jacking off?


If they weren't polished they'd look bad too. Think of it like this: The more polished, the better. But it can take a long time to polish from 1800 grit to 12000 grit (These grits are in Micro Mesh papers which aren't the same as regular sandpaper grits) Personally, I usually stop at Micro Mesh 6000 grit although 4000 would also be good enough for me.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Aug 10, 2010,