#1
Okay so I've been reading the fretboard logic books but I'm still a little confused. I'm at the point where I know the pentatonic scale that the first book teaches, and I know how to move it around the fretboard to change it to different keys. Now I'm in the second fretboard logic book and learning the diatonic scale.
My confusion here though is, how do I know when to use the said scales? Like if someone is playing a progression that's in C major do I just play the pentatonic scale in C over it and that's how it works? Could I do the same with Diatonic scale in C? Also is there a whole different set of notes to play if the progression was in C minor?

Sorry if that's a whole lot of questions all at once it's just sometimes I feel like "Ah okay.. I get it" and then suddenly "er..maybe I don't" Anyways thanks for any input.
#2
you have to listen and experiment, sometimes the pentatonic is suitable for a major progression, other times a major scale works better, ive gone a very long time without using certain scales, but when you find the right song for the scale, theres nothing quite like it
#3
There's like no specific theory rules for it though? And is the diatonic scale a major scale?
#4
Quote by Mozer22
There's like no specific theory rules for it though? And is the diatonic scale a major scale?


Think of music theory as a guide. Once you know the rules, how they work, and how certain things sound, you can follow or break the rules as you see fit.

As for your other question, no. There are more diatonic scales than just the major scale. To understand the difference between diatonic and chromatic, read this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic_and_chromatic
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Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.
#5
For every major scale there is a related minor scale. These two scales are built from the same notes:



Major Scale: C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C
Relative Minor Scale: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - A



The only difference between the two scales is which note you start with. The minor scale starts from the sixth note of the major scale. The scales are called RELATIVE because they share the exact same notes.
C minor is the relative minor scale of Eb major
#6
You apply them to songs the same way that you apply the penatonic. Identify the root note of the scale - this corresponds to the key of the song.

Other than that, minor scales belong with minor keys, major scales belong with major keys. The exception is the minor pentatonic, which creates a "bluesy" sound when played over a major progression.
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#7
Quote by Mozer22
[...]

Sorry if that's a whole lot of questions all at once it's just sometimes I feel like "Ah okay.. I get it" and then suddenly "er..maybe I don't" Anyways thanks for any input.


Here's a rule of thumb to help you get started. This works with most styles, with the notable exception of jazz. So, assuming you're not delving into jazz improvisation straight away:

Firstly, you will need to know the key the song is in. Then try and play the minor pentatonic (or blues scale) and see if that `fits'. If it doesn't, take the minor pentatonic pattern and slide it 3 frets down. Now you're in major pentatonic. Try and play that over the song.

Many times you will find that either of these scales fit the song well enough.

Most other more complex scales can be seen as extensions to the standard pentatonic scales.

If you want to know more about improvisation and which scales to learn read this http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/mastery/the-essence-of-improvisation-mastering-the-fretboard/