#1
i'm in a pop punk kinda band and our songs usually have that I-IV-V chord progression off the major scale. when i go to write solos, they all really sound just like the notes of the usual major scale:

Rx--
-x-x
x-xx
x-Rx
xx-x
-R-x

Should I learn the different modes of the major scale to add a more fluid and natrual sound to the solos rather than straight scale work?
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#2
Just because the chords are I IV and V off the major scale doesn't mean you need to play the major scale over it.
#3
tried pentatonic scales? or throw in som chromatics
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#4
major pentatonic scales right? cuz the relative minor would sound bluesy.
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#5
Quote by fear-the-reaper

Should I learn the different modes of the major scale to add a more fluid and natural sound to the solos rather than straight scale work?


No, modes don't work like that, you'd just be playing in the major scale if you did that. Over a I IV V progression the minor pentatonic can be used. That may not help you get the sound you want though, because that is typical of the blues, not pop punk. Try it though!

I think you should stick with the major scale and maybe experiment with accidentals.

Edit: however, I fear you may be talking about the different positions that map the fretboard. They aren't modes or scales, they are just patterns.
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Aug 9, 2010,
#6
If you're using just three chords in c major that's C major, f major and g major (I think), so you could use pretty much any scale that fit that.

Study the shapes for the major scales and its easy to transpose to any other key. I recommend learning the c and g scales because their shapes are the easiest to move up the neck to transpose.

Also, don't limit yourself to the modes, learn blues (which isn't to different) and different minor scales for extra flavour if you want to.
#7
I'm pretty well versed in blues (all the minor pentatonic scales and everything) but they really don't sound that great over the pop punk kinda thing.

I looked over major pentatonic box shapes and that helped some. I'll work with that and see how it goes.

Thanks everyone :]
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Try WebMD.


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#8
Try playing the vocal melody over it, and change it a bit up with phrasing. It's a great way to compose a solo, you're using a melody that has been used before that the listener will recognize, and you're spicing that up too.
#9
Quote by fear-the-reaper
cuz the relative minor would sound bluesy.


That depends how you use the scale. Does Metallica sound bluesy to you? Guns n Roses? AC/DC?

Unfortunately you can't just expect a scale to give you a new sound by replacing one or two notes with different ones. It's up to you.

Otherwise pop-punk music uses the major, minor and penatonic scales a lot. Once you know those, you should have all you need. Learn some of your favourite band's songs and see how they use those scales.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Just because the minor pentatonic scale is sometimes called the "blues scale" doesn't mean it will sound bluesy when it's played. It's not what you play, it's how you play it. I'm pretty sure Green Day have never used anything more than the pentatonic (though don't hold me to that)
#11
Major scale would probably sound well over it but I don't know the vocal melody, style, bassline, et cetera et catera. Pop punk is usually about the catchy melodies isn't it? You might want to try forgetting about scales and positions and composing a new melody that sounds well and just play with that.
#12
Quote by piop
Just because the minor pentatonic scale is sometimes called the "blues scale" doesn't mean it will sound bluesy when it's played.
Actually, it would be incorrect to call the minor pentatonic scale the "blues scale." The blues scale adds a passing tone to the standard minor pentatonic scale, thus it's a different scale.
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#13
Quote by food1010
Actually, it would be incorrect to call the minor pentatonic scale the "blues scale." The blues scale adds a passing tone to the standard minor pentatonic scale, thus it's a different scale.


Most people don't credit the blues scale as being a proper scale. If you really wanted to be a smartass you could call it a hexatonic scale, but to most people the blues scale is considered to be a minor pentatonic with an added "blue note".
Alas, that's all academic. We as guitarists all know what it means.
#14
Quote by piop
Most people don't credit the blues scale as being a proper scale. If you really wanted to be a smartass you could call it a hexatonic scale, but to most people the blues scale is considered to be a minor pentatonic with an added "blue note".
Alas, that's all academic. We as guitarists all know what it means.
Of course we do. I was just pointing out the distinction between the two. If someone told me to play the blues scale I would play a different scale than if they told me to play the minor pentatonic. The way you worded it made it seem as if they were the same scale.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea