#2
Atonal? Schoenberg is the first place you should start, no doubt. Here's a nice quality sample: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-fyWc6Mpd8

Also I love the highest rated comment on that video...
This is like hearing a conversation in a language you don't know. Clearly there is a logic and order to it, but it's just out of reach.
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Aug 9, 2010,
#6
^ Not sure you two really know what atonal means.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#9
That Unexpect link is pretty interesting. It sounds like a mash-up of theatre pieces, east european folk music, hair metal and some dude screaming.

However to suggest it lacks a tonal center, I'm not getting it. It does have a couple of different movements, that's about it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Go check out Ornette Coleman's album Free Jazz for a different approach. It's good and certainly unique.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#11
Schoenberg's 12-tonal music actually utilizes a set of rules that gave me a HUGE headache when we learned about him in theory class. Take all the theory you know, and make it 1000 times more complicated, that's what Schoenberg did.

If you wish to learn how he wrote his music then do some research on Pitch Class and Tone Rows.
#12
Tone rows are the most painful thing ever.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#13
Quote by tubab0y
Tone rows are the most painful thing ever.

Retrograde Inversion 7!
#14
No. I did it last year, I'm done. 16th century counterpoint on the other hand...
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#16
There unfortunately aren't many atonal guitar compositions, as far as I know.

I'm fond of Berg. Not all of his music was atonal, but a lot of it was: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crLFn2muMm4

I like Schoenberg, too, but Berg gets points for making some of the most lyrical atonal music I've ever heard. Shame he had to die so young.

EDIT: Also, while Miles Davis' album Bitches Brew isn't entirely atonal, many parts of it are: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUVXMWOWaS8

It sort of drifts from modal harmony to atonality and back. It took a lot of influence from free jazz.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Sep 8, 2010,
#17
i heard this one thing. cant remember his name but he did the wonderful song Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima.
#18
Quote by Im_Broken
i heard this one thing. cant remember his name but he did the wonderful song Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima.

Krzysztof Penderecki. And it's not a song, since nobody sings it; it's a piece, or a composition if you'd like.

Sorry, just a pet peeve.
#19
Quote by Holy Katana
There unfortunately aren't many atonal guitar compositions, as far as I know.

Every Slayer guitar solo?
#20
Mahavishnu Orchestra!

What might help you is to listen and learn a few piece that extend the sound of the Minor Key. Most "listenable to popular" atonal stuff stems from playing in Minor Keys. Here's a few examples...

Carmen - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axvhEUyVfX0 mainly a straight chromatic line containing every note except the b2 and M3.

Main Theme to The Elephant Man - http://music.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=music.artistalbums&artistid=44074146&albumid=16214075 Select Track 36 and move it ahead to 2:30 for the atonal line. Brilliant tune and line. Listen to the whole thing, absolutely stunning song.

Raymond Scott Powerhouse - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfDqR4fqIWE Incredible piece, listen to the whole thing

Raymond Scott Dinner Music For a Pack of Hungry Cannibals - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nl4ahPoU4Es start about 1:00 into it and listen to the major and minor chords changing almost randomly underneath for free form lines.

Now, lay down a track of nothing but say Am, and start out with some chromatic lines that move from one end of the spectrum to the other (maybe high to low like Carmen and the Elephant Man) then once you have a line experiment with liberating yourself to getting lost in the line and forget about the direction. You'll find you can rarely hit a bad note and can play with freedom foregoing any perceived scale.

This is a great learning ground for learning how to express with notes and realize how great the notes that "don't logically fit" are beautiful.

It and simple Minor Key is a simpler springboard into atonal than something like free jazz or something. Take it chromatically and slowly, then take it atonal. You'll feel it.