#1
So, I have this Silvertone SG that I've been wanting to do something with for a while, but still am not sure if it would be worth it. I'll have 200 dollars to spend in about a week and was wondering if I should start painting, replacing hardware, nut, electronics and such on this guitar. However, I'm not sure if it would be worth it. I can't figure out what type of wood the body is, but the neck looks nice. But then again, this was my first guitar and the only knowledge I've gained about evaluating necks and such has been from books - no first hand experience, so I don't wanna run the risk of missing something, spending 200 bucks fixing it up only to find out the neck is warped or something.

So what should factor in to me deciding to fix this thing up as aposed to saving a little more and getting, say, and Agile Les Paul? What makes a guitar worth fixing up and one not? What are those differences? Better yet, since I do prefer the Les Paul over the SG anyday, what should I factor in to buying an Agile to upgrade? Are there ones that I souldn't bother with? Obviously nice tone wood over plywood, but there's gotta be more to it to that.

I've already sanded the back of the SG like an idiot so if I was going to go the Agile route I would still need to paint it to sell. Then again I could keep it and use it as a practice for painting and such. I want to do a custom fretboard inlay and binding - would I need to make a new neck or could I do it on an already finished one?

Thanks.

I'll post some pictures if needed.
#2
If you already know you want a Les Paul, why not save your money for that?

In the mean time, the first thing to learn about modding is how to set up a guitar properly: neck, frets, bridge and saddles, nut, etc.
This is a good place to start: Electric Guitar > Ultimate Setup Guide

My main criteria for when to spend money upgrading a guitar is how it feels when I play (once I've set it up of course!)
A proper setup also lets you see if specific parts have problems and really need to be replace first.
Last edited by cedricsmods at Aug 9, 2010,
#3
Quote by cedricsmods
If you already know you want a Les Paul, why not save your money for that?

In the mean time, the first thing to learn about modding is how to set up a guitar properly: neck, frets, bridge and saddles, nut, etc.
This is a good place to start: Electric Guitar > Ultimate Setup Guide

My main criteria for when to spend money upgrading a guitar is how it feels when I play (once I've set it up of course!)
A proper setup also lets you see if specific parts have problems and really need to be replace first.



Ya, I know about bridge and saddle setups and neck adjustment, but since what I've done I've learned from a book I thought that I could be missing something crucial.

I think I'll just keep it to practice on. I really want to do an inlay. Will I need a new neck?
#4
Sorry for the double post, but I just realized I'd have enough to get this.

http://www.rondomusic.com/al2500hsb.html

I'd go for a 3000 or something higher, but I hat the triple binding Agile does and the blank headstocks. This fixes both of those problems and I could do some hardware upgrading in the future.
#5
Get an agile. They KICK ASS. especially epiphone ass. And I don't know what you'd factor in to upgrade it. I love mine as is (stock except for major wiring modifications). I'd just throw in a jimmy page wiring setup and maybe a new bridge as the original ones have the funky little retainer wire.
Last edited by LeviMan_2001 at Aug 10, 2010,