#1
Can anybody help? I like using this chord in kind of funky situations, but I don't know what I'm supposed to do for melodies/solos over it.
#3
Depends on how it's used, so I can't give you a good answer without a progression.

Edit: Ninja'd
i don't know why i feel so dry
#4
Well, the advantage of the 7#9 chord is that includes both a flat 3rd and a natural 3rd. In other words, if you have a bar playing an A7#9, you can play either an Amajor scale or an Aminor scale over it. Both will sound very Jazzy or have a "Hard" Blues feel.

However, it gets a little stickier if you use a 7#9 in a riff or a chord progression. If you play, for example: Fmaj7, A7#9, C7, and Edim7; then you would solo over this using a Fmajor scale. Alternatively, if you play: Em7, G6, A7#9, and Dmaj7; then you would play solo over it with an Eminor scale. The point is that it depends on the context.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Aug 10, 2010,
#5
oh yeah i guess i should've explained better. just as a single chord by itself, the E hendrix chord, when you use just 1 chord its called a static chord right? i get that confused...
#6
Quote by TMVATDI
oh yeah i guess i should've explained better. just as a single chord by itself, the E hendrix chord, when you use just 1 chord its called a static chord right? i get that confused...


I have a song where the bridge is just this chord for maybe 1 1/2 minutes or so, this is how I approach it, but others are free to correct me on the technicalities.

It's called a vamp - just one chord repeated over and over again.

You can use the E minor pentatonic to solo over it, but the other choice is using the major scale with a flattened 7th. What I'm not sure about is whether this is actual use of the mixolydian scale, because I'm not sure whether it's a modal use.

BUT, it's important to note that in this bridge the tonic is in E (actually a modulation in the song). If you're just encountering this in the scheme of a song, you should refer to the key of the song in addition to the chord.
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#7
you can play the E blues or E mixolydian for starters. E dorian may also work, but im not sure i'd do that.
you could also try a superlocrian (1 flat everything else) sound over it if you want to get fancy with altered harmony.
Basically, you want bring out the sound of the chord (3 and 7 particularly) as well as the #9 and any other altered tensions you want.
#8
Quote by AlanHB
You can use the E minor pentatonic to solo over it, but the other choice is using the major scale with a flattened 7th. What I'm not sure about is whether this is actual use of the mixolydian scale, because I'm not sure whether it's a modal use.

Regardless of whether it's modal or not, the chord is "complex" enough and already has that modal sound by itself (kind of like an Xadd#11 has a very Lydian feel). It's not modal, but E Mixolydian with a #2 would be perfect. E minor pent would work. Even standard E Minor would be fine. It's been pointed out that the chord uses BOTH the M/m3 of E so really E minor OR Major would be fine. Just take into account the b7 when going into E Major.
#9
By itself, Mixolydian would probably be most appropriate. Minor would work also, but then the tritone that makes dominant chords so interesting would be lost in the melody. I would do Mixolydian. If you're interested in Pitch Axis, you could switch between Mixo, Dorian, and Minor.

Edit: For Mixo, you'd either have to sharpen the 2 or avoid the 2 altogether. For Dorian and Minor, avoid the 4 except as a passing tone. It will clash otherwise.

When it's in a progression acting as an altered secondary dominant, Mixolydian or Minor would be your best choices. If the song is in a Major key, I would put money down that Mixo would sound better, and visa versa.

When it's a non-functioning altered secondary dominant, there are too many variables to say.

This is all assuming you're trying to improvise over it. If you're trying to compose a melody, I recommend the classical approach.
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Aug 10, 2010,
#10
Over 7#9 Hendrix generally used the minor pentatonic scale. (and not much else)
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#11
Take into account where the chord is resolving to aswell.

You can use the Mixolydian scale over it if it's resolving to a major chord a 4th above or 5th below (which ever way you want to look at it). If it's resolving to a minor chord in the same way, then use the Mixolydian b6. (That's just a Mixolydian scale with a... well, a b6.) If you use this scale, then strictly speaking the Hendrix chord should be labelled as a 7b13.

The 6th interval in both scales will prepare the listeners ear for the resolve, since it will end up acting as a major 3rd or minor 3rd respectively.
Last edited by mdc at Aug 10, 2010,
#12
Quote by mdc
Take into account where the chord is resolving to aswell.

You can use the Mixolydian scale over it if it's resolving to a major chord a 4th above or 5th below (which ever way you want to look at it). If it's resolving to a minor chord in the same way, then use the Mixolydian b6. (That's just a Mixolydian scale with a... well, a b6.) If you use this scale, then strictly speaking the Hendrix chord should be labelled as a 7b13.


If the song resolves to a major or minor chord, you use the major or minor scales - accidentals would be used to accommodate for the "hendrix chord". Or are you trying to make a different point?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
Minor pentatonic usually feels good over a 7#9 vamp but let your ears do the thinkin man. I had a solo over Foxy Lady at a gig once(F#7 #9) and you can use pretty mad accidentals, but over that song it always feels best to finish in the minor pentatonic.
Last edited by Declan87 at Aug 10, 2010,
#14
For E7#9 play the E Minor Pentatonic scale for a bit, then sneak in the E H-W Tone scale.

Those are pretty the two scales for that chord. Since the common voicing is with the #9 in the higher register it over shadows the M3 in the chord. So that's why the Minor Petn works better than anything else...but you can start adding in the M3 and and making the #9 sound like what it is (a #9) by using the H-W scale from the root of the chord.
#15
Quote by AlanHB
If the song resolves to a major or minor chord, you use the major or minor scales - accidentals would be used to accommodate for the "hendrix chord". Or are you trying to make a different point?

On reflection, the TS may decide to not resolve to a I or i at all! In which case the dominant would change from functioning to non-functioning.

My initial response and suggestion clearly assumed that that was what he was going to do. I shouldn't jump to conclusions.

Errr.... **** it, just use E Minor Pentatonic! Back to a serious note again (pun not intended), there are 4 other shapes to whizz you across the fretboard. Don't be tempted with just shape 1! The possibilities mate, the possibilities.
Last edited by mdc at Aug 11, 2010,
#16
It simply depends on what's going on in the rest of the song. You're not going to "change scales" for that one chord, chances are that the piece is just going to be in a major or minor key and the chord has just been thrown in there for it's interesting harmony.
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