#1
Just checking, do they have what we would call a thin, "fast neck" like an Ibanez?
Gear:

Vintage VS6 (Wine Red)

Marshall VS100 Valvestate head with 4x12 angled cab

Squier Strat (Fiesta Red) 90's, Korean
#2
I have a Charvel (back then Jackson and Charvel were the same company) and an Ibanez, and the Charvel does have a thin neck maybe not as thin as the Ibanez.
Stuff:
ESP/LTD EC-200QM (with SD Distortions)
1986 Charvel Model 4
2013 Ibanez RG7421WH

Amps
Marshall MS-2 microamp (a POS)
B-52 LG-100a head (Not bad)

Pedals
Digitech Grunge distortion
#3
i just picked up a jackson SLS3 in the sotre the otehr day. amazing guitar if you want a darkish shred guitar. great matte black finish, neck through with incredible easy access to high frets, superb quality, string through, TOM bridge. my kind of shredder.

however i the neck is akward for me. just dont like em. i like more regualr classic necks. fenders, les pauls, heck even teeny tiny mosrite necks. its not the overall size, is the shape/contour. i like a nice curve. perfect hafl moon kinda thing.

the neck on this jackson (along with a lot of shred guitars) is like a D shape, but with a shallow curve. more like a (l shape. to my hand it almost feels like the neck goes flat in the back.

not for me. and i would say the few high end ibanez ive held had slightly thinner necks
#4
There is no such thing as a "fast neck" - thin necks don't help you play faster. That's an internet myth. There is some truth to the idea of high quality fretwork helping you play faster.

Ibanez wizard necks are somewhat thinner than US Jacksons (I couldn't say about all the imports). Personally I find the Wizard profile extremely uncomfortable. There's a reason most of the big Ibanez endorsers get other profiles on their sig guitars. I hate to say this, but I think the wizard neck was designed to appeal to kids who mistakenly think that thin equals fast.
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“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
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#5
I'm not a kid and i find ibanez wizard necks the most comfortable because i have small hands fwiw..
Jackson necks are fairly slim but not to ibanez wizard extremes.
#6
due to its "imo akward" feel the jackson necks feel larger to me than otehr necks like les pauls. its because they dont sit right in my hand so they feel out of place.

thinnest neck ive ever played is my univox hi-flier mosrite copy (mosrite has stupidly small necks) i love it. i dont care about overall size as long as the carve/contour agrees with my hand.

another big one is radius. ever try playing a flat neck? try picking up a classical acoustic guitar and see what i mean. holy lord.

every try doing big bends on a vintage guitar? def. frets out easier. thats why teh standard radius is like what 12? right in the middle.

mos stred guitars range from 12-16. flatter up higher where you shred, more curved lower where you fret chords and junk.
Last edited by ikey_ at Aug 10, 2010,
#7
Quote by Even Bigger D
There is no such thing as a "fast neck" - thin necks don't help you play faster. That's an internet myth. There is some truth to the idea of high quality fretwork helping you play faster.

Ibanez wizard necks are somewhat thinner than US Jacksons (I couldn't say about all the imports). Personally I find the Wizard profile extremely uncomfortable. There's a reason most of the big Ibanez endorsers get other profiles on their sig guitars. I hate to say this, but I think the wizard neck was designed to appeal to kids who mistakenly think that thin equals fast.

I disagree..

I'm not sure what you're referring as the "wizard neck" because there are like 8-10 separate necks in total..

thin necks are fast = myth
thin necks are designed to fool kids - Bullshit

comfort is extremely subjective..some people find thin necks fast and comfortable some people find fat necks comfortable and I respect whatever his/her choice is,same with music..I dont go pissing off people who listen to rap and tell that its for 13 year old kids...I'm sorry but you have to extremely ignorant to say something like that..

and BTW,its not just the thinness I find appealing,the wider frets and flatter radius also suits my hands..as for the endorsee thing,you're nuts..only the signature models have slightly different neck shapes(except for the JEM,UV,some PGMS and egen)all other ibanez endorsees play wizard necks
#9
Fast necks aren't a myth, a fast neck is whatever profile is more natural to the player. Also, a satin finish neck will normally be faster than a gloss finish because the hand slides more naturally across it IF you play with you hand against the neck, though this is generally considered to be bad posture.

I personally think Jackson necks feel great to me, much more natural. I never have been too impressed with ibanez, but I have big hands.
#10
I love thin, wide necks (as in more space between each string, but a thin neck). It just feels so great to me.
Breaking stereotypes by playing indie on a metal guitar.

Current Gear
- Epiphone Les Paul Standard (Plus Top)
- Crappy Strat Copy (Redecorated, looks snazzy)
- Ibanez Acoustic/Electric Guitar
- Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Watt
#11
Quote by Eurozeppelin
Just checking, do they have what we would call a thin, "fast neck" like an Ibanez?


You asked what kind of neck profile Jackson guitars have. Since most ppl went on a meta-level term struggle about what's a fast neck (and further on, is thin neck fast), I'm gonna answear the question with a proper quote.

Jackson (and charvels as far as I know) have what we call Compound Radius neck.

"A compound radius neck has a smaller radius at the nut, and a larger radius at the neck and body joint. As the neck gets wider, the fretboard gets flatter, which is said to be an aid when soloing. The compound radius accomplishes this with a continuously flattening shape beginning with, for example, a 10-inch radius at the string nut and flattening to a 16-inch radius at the highest fret. Compound radius necks are a concept that Warmoth guitars introduced in the 1980s to improve comfort and playability. Warmoth developed the theory and technology to make the fretboard conical, retaining a tighter radius in the area commonly used for rhythm and chording, while flattening the area used for string bending and lead playing. "

Jackson necks tend to be rather thin. But the main thing you want to know, is that theyre also wide. Than can be either an assist or an obstacle. Some people like it, some don't. Which group do you belong to?

Personally, I liked the necks alright after getting used to, but I wouldn't say they were any better than Ibby Gibby BiCry or Espy. I'd say the latter ones where easier play.

-R