#1
Hey UG,

I have a decent handle on scale patterns and chord shapes (major, minor, pentatonic, blues, major modes) and am focusing on improving my scale "vocabulary".

The problem is, when improvising lead parts I tend to stay in the same position of the fretboard as I have learned these scales from their root. So while I can play "across" the fretbard pretty well, I'm limited in my playing range up and down the fretboard.

Can you reccomend some excersizes or ways to approach fixing this? I'm guessing one would be to learn each scale starting at diffrent scale degrees?

Another challenge is I do not currently have my notes memorized on the freboard except on the low E string and across the top few frets.

Thanks
Gear:
Parker P44PRO
Peavey Classic 30
Boss PH2
Boss OD-20
Boss RC-20
MXR ZW44
#2
I had (and still sort of do) this problem. I found that taking the different parts of, lets say the major scale, and designating mode parts to 2 or 3 strings helps this a lot. Like the Ionian would be my E & A Dorian would be my D & G and than phyrigian would be B & E.

Of course you can mix and match this in any way you see fit such as assigning 2 modes to 1 string. The idea is to get used to moving while keeping a consistency. Once you get this down and can move without having to think to much try throwing some arpeggios in or switch to a pentatonic half way through.
Last edited by derpdragon at Aug 10, 2010,
#3
look for a video on youtube on the riff of the week channel i think it`s called fretboard freedom, also there was a very similar thread already on this topic, this week....... it`s a common problem that people learn a shape and can`t move out of the shape, use your imagination and your ears. learn the circle of 5ths, caged system etc.
#4
Start thinking about what you're playing rather than jsut moving your fingers.

Start with the chords you're playing over, they're your reference points - if a chord is being played then the notes of that chord will be obvious choices to play, as will a lot of the notes near it.
Keep in mind all the other places those chords appear, those will make equally useful reference points.
When you're playing, actually think about what sound you want, and when you hear what you've played think about what sound you want next.
Figure out where you can get that sound from, there'll probably be a couple of options, and choose the most convenient one that gives you the sound you want.

The patterns are somewhat irrelelevant in that they in no way dictate what you're going to play - you decide that yourself, the patterns just help you find the notes.

Listen to the chords, allow them to guide your choice of notes and you'll naturally find yourself moving around the fretboard.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Quote by SilverSN95
Hey UG,

I have a decent handle on scale patterns and chord shapes (major, minor, pentatonic, blues, major modes)




What people have said looks pretty good. Also remember (in case you don't do this) that you can take a solo really really really slow
Tick tock and waiting for the meteor
This clock is opening another door
#6
Thanks for the replies Ill take a look into the suggestions.

If I'm playing very slowly, i can usually find the correct note I want anywhere on the fretboard but I have to think about it, and so the problem comes when I want to speed up. It seems like its going to take a lot more experience to not have to think about that. I do think scales and their shapes are useful in that regard, but maybe the problem is I'm just thinking about it too much...
Gear:
Parker P44PRO
Peavey Classic 30
Boss PH2
Boss OD-20
Boss RC-20
MXR ZW44
#7
I would suggest learnig all of the roots of your fretboard so you are able to displace your patterns.
Guitars
Ibanez Prestige RG355OXM
Fender Mexican Deluxe Series Stratocaster
Fender Squire Bullet
Schecter Damien Elite 8
Yamaha F325 Acoustic

Amps
Peavey 5150 II Full stack
Peavey 2001 Studio Pro 112
Roland Micro Cube
#8
the thing about modes is that there are only 7 of them, BUT they repeat themselves even from within a SINGLE mode...

for example:

let's say you are using the Aeolian mode to solo in, which is pretty common say, in the key of A Minor. You already know the aeolian (minor) scale in the root position starting on the 5th fret.

if you go UP one position and play the SAME scale starting on the 7th fret, then you have what APPEARS to be the locrian shape, although you are still in the same key.

so if you already know your modal shapes from the root position, just figure out what order they go in and you can use any of the modal shapes in any key, so long as you PLACE it in the right place on the fretboard.

make sense?

PEACE
#9
Quote by SilverSN95
The problem is, when improvising lead parts I tend to stay in the same position of the fretboard as I have learned these scales from their root. So while I can play "across" the fretbard pretty well, I'm limited in my playing range up and down the fretboard.

You need to memorize your linear patterns and give them equal attention to your lateral patterns.

To start, choose one string and improvise using only that string (use the whole length of the neck). Keep it simple at first and then when it feels pretty good, start making bigger linear jumps while improving. Do this continually until you're sick of it. Then repeat the process on another string.
Once you can really improvise on all 6 strings individually... Start practicing the same way on 2 adjacent strings, and so on. etc.

When this all sinks in to your brain, your current perception of scales will change. You will see beyond any fixed position - problem solved.
#10
Quote by GuitarSlinger00
the thing about modes is that there are only 7 of them, BUT they repeat themselves even from within a SINGLE mode...

for example:

let's say you are using the Aeolian mode to solo in, which is pretty common say, in the key of A Minor. You already know the aeolian (minor) scale in the root position starting on the 5th fret.

if you go UP one position and play the SAME scale starting on the 7th fret, then you have what APPEARS to be the locrian shape, although you are still in the same key.

so if you already know your modal shapes from the root position, just figure out what order they go in and you can use any of the modal shapes in any key, so long as you PLACE it in the right place on the fretboard.

make sense?

PEACE

ffs, this has absolutely nothing to do with modes and not really a lot to do with shapes either.

TS, you already know the answer - time and experience. Like you've said, you can do it slowly and the more you practice and work on things the easier it becomes. Learning to play the guitar is not a quick process, things take a lot of time and you simply have to be patient.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at Aug 12, 2010,