#1
so im trying to get my perfect set up and im almost there. sometimes, i like to be very warm and thick sounding like eric johnson. others i like to be brighter and thinner. problem is trying to get a good setup to where i can get both. if i set my amp really warm sounding, its sounds great but i cant get the screaming highs and also my neck pickup sound is far too warm sounding. so if i set it up brighter so that the neck P/U sounds good and i can get some nice screaming sounds from the bridge, it becomes hard to turn the tone down for the thick warm sound again without going into "woman tone" teritory. which dont get me wrong i like, but its not exactly what im going for.

so im wondering if i can change the range on the tone pot. ive heard by changing the capacitor on the tone pot i can change the range towards the lower end more, or the higher end. im wondering, is there a way to increase it both ways? if not, which way should i go? im guessing if i go down, i should set my amp brighter. if i go higher i should set the amp warmer. which do you think would be best to get " the best of both worlds?
#2
Firstly, if you change the taper of the pot to reverse log, it will give a smoother control range. Secondly, by deceasing the size of the capacitor, it will shift the frequency response to the right (higher frequency); but by increasing the size of the capacitor, it will shift the response to the left, or lower in frequency. To shift it by an octave, double the capacitance to halve the frequency, and halving the capacitance will shift up an octave.

If you want to change the frequency response, I'd suggest merely changing the capacitor to the closest value, if the cap is a .22uF go up to a .33uF to shift it down some. Changing it to .47uF will shift the frequency response down by just over an octave.

Edit: To do both, increase the capacitance, but also the pot value. Note, this will also increase noise.

If you really wanna read up about filters and tone controls, look into the active filter cookbook, the beginning section is on passive filters, so it'd teach you about it all along the way, too.
Last edited by blandguitar at Aug 10, 2010,
#3
Quote by blandguitar
Firstly, if you change the taper of the pot to reverse log, it will give a smoother control range.
I strongly recommend against a reverse log pot. This will leave you with a ton of rotation from 3 to 10 where there a very small amount of tone-cut. All the real action will be squashed in the beginning of the rotation, under 3. Personally, I don't even like linear for a tone control. Audio taper works best here, imho. Although some will contend that they prefer linear.

Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
so im trying to get my perfect set up and im almost there. sometimes, i like to be very warm and thick sounding like eric johnson. others i like to be brighter and thinner. problem is trying to get a good setup to where i can get both. if i set my amp really warm sounding, its sounds great but i cant get the screaming highs and also my neck pickup sound is far too warm sounding. so if i set it up brighter so that the neck P/U sounds good and i can get some nice screaming sounds from the bridge, it becomes hard to turn the tone down for the thick warm sound again without going into "woman tone" teritory. which dont get me wrong i like, but its not exactly what im going for.

so im wondering if i can change the range on the tone pot. ive heard by changing the capacitor on the tone pot i can change the range towards the lower end more, or the higher end. im wondering, is there a way to increase it both ways? if not, which way should i go? im guessing if i go down, i should set my amp brighter. if i go higher i should set the amp warmer. which do you think would be best to get " the best of both worlds?
If you're not opposed to having a push-pull pot for your tone control, you can use the switch section to select between 2 different capacitors.
Meadows
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#4
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I strongly recommend against a reverse log pot. This will leave you with a ton of rotation from 3 to 10 where there a very small amount of tone-cut. All the real action will be squashed in the beginning of the rotation, under 3. Personally, I don't even like linear for a tone control. Audio taper works best here, imho. Although some will contend that they prefer linear.


The way the active filter cookbook lays out the controls, the reverse log linearizes the scale with the way the frequencies jump in an anti-log pattern within the decade, then logarithmic from decade to decade.
#5
Quote by blandguitar
The way the active filter cookbook lays out the controls, the reverse log linearizes the scale with the way the frequencies jump in an anti-log pattern within the decade, then logarithmic from decade to decade.
I'm not gonna disagree with Don Lancaster. He and Walter Jung wrote two of the bibles I often used for my designs. But here's the problem. A guitar tone-cut circuit isn't an active filter. In fact, it isn't even a standard first-order passive filter.

Look carefully where R, C, input, and output are on a simple RC filter.

Now look at where they are on a guitar. Do you see the glaring difference?
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#7
what guitar is this going to btw? and i use audio taper bourns guitar pots for all my guitars. 250k for single coil, 500k for humbucker. it sounds the best when it's set around 5~8. to me at least.

if you have a single coil equipped guitar, i suggest a .022uF tone cap, because the top end rolls off nicely, but it retains some of the clarity, at least it sounds like it to mee. i haven't experimented much with humbuckers, but i like .022uF for the bridge, but lower capacitance for the neck. .015uF or something is nice.

to me, when i put in a .047uF cap in my strat, it sounded a bit too muddy when i turned it down.
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