#1
Hello all,

I have an issue...

I have been trying out different picks now for about a year hoping to find one that won't slip/rotate when I play at quick speeds. The only one that I have had some success with is the Dunlop Ultex Sharp. I believe this is because it is very stiff and has a very sharp point.

The problem is that these picks aren't that accessible, they are pricey, and they aren't practical for rhythm.

So how do guys like Paul Gilbert, Buckethead, Steve Vai, etc... get away with using plain Jane guitar picks? Is it the fact that they just practiced every minute of their life at increasing tempos and the muscles in the fingers grew stronger and able to handle the gradual increase in speed?

I'm obsessing over this... (have been for a year... not healthy) haha.

Anyway, thanks in advance dudes!!!
#2
Get a pack of COOL picks, they have griptape on them and almost never slip, and I use extra heavys to play speed metal, trust me when I say tehse picks work
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
How are you holding your pick? Some people have trouble with controlling picks and especially thick picks. How you're holding it can cause this problem. There is no right or wrong way it's basically how comfortable it feels in your fingers and whether or not you actually have control of it. So, how do you hold your pick?
____________________________________________
GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#4
I have tried COOL picks before dude. Honestly they are pretty good. I like the grip. I just wanna know how guys do it just using plain old picks. I don't want to be at a campfire and say "Oh man I can't play you guys a song cause I don't have my COOL pick" haha. You know what I mean?

Thanks for the reply bro!
#5
I find that I flip picks out of my grip so often due to relaxing my grip on the pick as I start to focus on my right hand more. I often wonder if I should be maintaining a somewhat firm grip while keeping my wrist more loose.
#6
I hold the pick with my thumb and side of my index finger. The rest of my finger just sort of hang ya know. My picking technique is very similar to Paul Gilbert. I feel that it helps if I move the pick back towards the palm allowing more thumb over the pick but then I feel like I lose some control of the picking. Is it someting that I just have to work out? Haha.
#7
Quote by trashmetal316
I hold the pick with my thumb and side of my index finger. The rest of my finger just sort of hang ya know. My picking technique is very similar to Paul Gilbert. I feel that it helps if I move the pick back towards the palm allowing more thumb over the pick but then I feel like I lose some control of the picking. Is it someting that I just have to work out? Haha.


Yeah it is something that you just have to work out but if you feel like you're losing control of the picking at any time you're gonna need to make some adjustments or else the slipping might continue. Try various, firm but comfortable (most important) ways to hold your pick, even if you use the 3 finger grip like many guitarists do. You never want to feel like you're going to lose pick control so I say play around with some different grips to find what's comfortable and what works.
____________________________________________
GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#8
Don't use any fancy picks. Work on forearm strenght and grip. Powerball works for some people, or just grip the pick as had as you can (juts don't hrut yourself) as an exercise.
#11
Oh, I'd totally forgotten, but I used to find it very helpful to putt a cross hatch of scratches on the surface of the pick, using a knife. Other people have suggested skateboard grip tape.
#12
Quote by Freepower
Oh, I'd totally forgotten, but I used to find it very helpful to putt a cross hatch of scratches on the surface of the pick, using a knife.

I make a checkerboard pattern on the top half of both sides of my picks using a soldering iron, works like a champ.

Also, if you want a sharp pick, you can always sand them down.
I did a couple like that, but I don't use them.
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#13
Quote by Freepower
Oh, I'd totally forgotten, but I used to find it very helpful to putt a cross hatch of scratches on the surface of the pick, using a knife. Other people have suggested skateboard grip tape.


Yeah, I have done both myself. Definitely a nifty thing. I prefer just using plain Ultex Jazz III's these days though.

Also, a lot of my past gripping problems stemmed from simply picking too hard. Sometimes the desired tone calls for hard picking, but you can do so in a way that doesn't cause the string to push back extremely hard on the pick.

Btw this is fixationdarknes. My account is banned lol.
#15
I use the Dunlop MaxGrips, they have the size and shape of Jazz 3 but have a grippy texture on them. No more slipping!
#16
The Dunlop Eric Johnson Jazz III's are the best picks I have ever used, hands down. It will never slip on you. Try it.

The regular old black Jazz III's are pretty good too, a bit stiffer than the Eric Johnson's. I use both depending what I'm playing.
#17
I second the Dunlop Max Grips.
Only found them two days ago, and I love them so far.

I've got very little feeling in the fingers of my picking hand, so I can't even tell when picks are slipping until the notes stop ringing out!

These seem to be doing the trick so far for me :-)
Right handed guitarist trying to learn to play lefty after a ten year break, and a severe left-hand injury!

Wish me luck ;-)
#18
Quote by Freepower
Oh, I'd totally forgotten, but I used to find it very helpful to putt a cross hatch of scratches on the surface of the pick, using a knife. Other people have suggested skateboard grip tape.


This. Also, store them in baby powder. When you play, there should still be enough on them to absorb sweat. Though does mean you do have to put fairly deep cross hatching in them, as the baby powder will make them a bit slippier.
#19
"Oh man I can't play you guys a song cause I don't have my COOL pick" haha.
WTH do you think that little pocket in your jeans is for ...
#20
Quote by Deaddog
WTH do you think that little pocket in your jeans is for ...



ahahahahahahahahh. The Watch Pocket is the pick's best friend. handy for rubber johnnys too lol
#21
Try those picks with grips ... picks with rubber or leather grip are pretty helpful in your issue , i'd recommend rubber one
#22
Hey dudes!

Thanks for all of your replies!

I have spent the last few days woodshedding and I have discovered the problem! I was spending too much time worrying about this stupid problem and not enough time playing guitar. After a few hours of practice the problem was gone. Looks like the tiny muscles in your pick-holding fingers need a little love too!
#24
Quote by trashmetal316
Hey dudes!

Thanks for all of your replies!

I have spent the last few days woodshedding and I have discovered the problem! I was spending too much time worrying about this stupid problem and not enough time playing guitar. After a few hours of practice the problem was gone. Looks like the tiny muscles in your pick-holding fingers need a little love too!

No such thing as tiny muscles in pick-holding fingers.

It's your forearm muscles doing all the work, so get yourself a powerball or something..