#1
Prolly a silly question, but can reverb tanks or anything else in the amp be worn down in anyway by using reverb / high reverb.

This is on a fender blues junior. They call it Fender Reverb, I think it's spring reverb.

Just curious.
#2
Not that I am aware of, no.
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#3
If it's a tube amp, it probably has a tube either before it, after it, or both. That preamp tube could get weak, causing a loss of reverb.
#4
The Blues Jr.'s reverb isn't tube driven.
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#5
Yes. They do wear. The springs are physically connected to hooks on the end when they move they do rub however minutely against what they are hooked to. Most if not all spring reverbs also have multiple springs linked together to make a longer spring. Where they connect they can rub metal on metal. Also moving your amp with a spring reverb unit makes the springs move and the connecting points rub against one another creating some wear over time.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Aug 10, 2010,
#6
One time for poops and giggles, I told one not-too-intelligent acquaintance of mine that his reverb tank sounded like it was about to go, and that he needed to go and buy some 'reverb fluid' to top it up. After about 3 days of looking on the internet he brought his amp to the local Long&McQuade and the techs (who I am friendly with) had to try their hardest to not crack up laughing as he told them the issue.
#7
Quote by TimmyPage06
One time for poops and giggles, I told one not-too-intelligent acquaintance of mine that his reverb tank sounded like it was about to go, and that he needed to go and buy some 'reverb fluid' to top it up. After about 3 days of looking on the internet he brought his amp to the local Long&McQuade and the techs (who I am friendly with) had to try their hardest to not crack up laughing as he told them the issue.

. Nice.

Now, if he had one of the original massive reverb tanks that used springs and oil, the story lost all of its funny.

Sorry.
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#8
Quote by sparkeyjames
Yes. They do wear. The springs are physically connected to hooks on the end when they move they do rub however minutely against what they are hooked to. Most if not all spring reverbs also have multiple springs linked together to make a longer spring. Where they connect they can rub metal on metal. Also moving your amp with a spring reverb unit makes the springs move and the connecting points rub against one another creating some wear over time.


great response.

wear is not the usual culprit with reverb tanks, those damn springs tend to come undone with some jostle and they tend to 'fall apart'

tube amps (well amps in general) use a preamplifier to send to the reverb tank and another preamplifier for the signal coming back from the tank and then the amp will mix those sounds. as mentioned before the preamp tubes in the 'send/recieve' for the reverb may be going bad if there is fade occuring. but the reverb tank itself is more likely to suddenly snap then to fade out.
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