#1
hey, so, ive seen many great composers doing some crazy solos and riffs, but, some dont fitt in one scale only...
Who do i mix scales, like malsmsteen, or to do a riff.

thz
#2
I'm not completely sure what you're asking, but I'm gonna pretend it's something like, "Hey, so I've heard about people using different scales when they play harmonies, what does that mean and how can I do it?"

Simply, there are relative keys. Someone can be playing in a A minor scale, and they're using the same notes as someone playing in a C major scale. So, all of the minor scales have one major scale that uses the same notes, and vise versa. Thus, if someone is playing a rhythm in an A minor scale, you can play a melody over that in a C major scale and it will harmonize pretty well. Of course, there are exceptions to that rule depending on the chords you play in the rhythm and the notes of the scale used in the melody.

For anything beyond that, I'd send you to the lessons section of the site. One specific lesson that stands out is Logz's lesson on modes, it's a little advanced when it comes to music theory terminology, but the content is invaluable.

Good luck!
One day met a and he was all like because he had
never met a before. I told about the powers that this
possessed and he proceeded to it for its magical meat.
Then died. The End.
#3
Quote by DemoAbrantes
hey, so, ive seen many great composers doing some crazy solos and riffs, but, some dont fitt in one scale only...
Who do i mix scales, like malsmsteen, or to do a riff.

thz



be more specific, examples of songs?
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#5
Does Malmsteen really use that many scales? I don't profess to be an expert on the guy, but it sounds like a lot of harmonic minor, and a lot of modulation in some songs. Correct me if I'm wrong.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Quote by AlanHB
Does Malmsteen really use that many scales? I don't profess to be an expert on the guy, but it sounds like a lot of harmonic minor, and a lot of modulation in some songs. Correct me if I'm wrong.



No, you're right
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#7
Quote by AlanHB
but it sounds like a lot of Eb harmonic minor

Fixed

Kidding, you pretty much got it.
#8
Quote by DemoAbrantes
some dont fitt in one scale only...

You mean chromatics?

The basic rule is you can use any (non-direct) dissonance, as long as you resolve the tension by doing something consonant. This will always sound "safe," even if you're using out of key notes from other scales. This tension and resolution can be found in most passing tones, Anticipation, Neighbour tone, Escape tone and in suspensions. It's called a "non-chord tone," as dissonance and consonance is usually distinguished by the harmony (at least in "classical" theory).

Not sure if that's helpful, but it might give you a place to start studying. Dissonance is a pretty big subject.
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[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#9
Quote by TacoSaladMan
I'm not completely sure what you're asking, but I'm gonna pretend it's something like, "Hey, so I've heard about people using different scales when they play harmonies, what does that mean and how can I do it?"

Simply, there are relative keys. Someone can be playing in a A minor scale, and they're using the same notes as someone playing in a C major scale. So, all of the minor scales have one major scale that uses the same notes, and vise versa. Thus, if someone is playing a rhythm in an A minor scale, you can play a melody over that in a C major scale and it will harmonize pretty well. Of course, there are exceptions to that rule depending on the chords you play in the rhythm and the notes of the scale used in the melody.

For anything beyond that, I'd send you to the lessons section of the site. One specific lesson that stands out is Logz's lesson on modes, it's a little advanced when it comes to music theory terminology, but the content is invaluable.

Good luck!



nop thats the basics

I mean, didnt you ever seen a solo that is in the same position on the neck, but uses several "licks" that doesnt fit in the same scale that he did in the lick he did before, its hard to esplain...
Necrophagist, is one band. Its hard to tell hes playing 1 scale, and if you see the tabs, you dont understand shit (at least i dont). check it out
#10
Quote by DemoAbrantes
nop thats the basics

I mean, didnt you ever seen a solo that is in the same position on the neck, but uses several "licks" that doesnt fit in the same scale that he did in the lick he did before, its hard to esplain...
Necrophagist, is one band. Its hard to tell hes playing 1 scale, and if you see the tabs, you dont understand shit (at least i dont). check it out


Nope, that's actually wrong, not the basics. You can't play C major over an A min scale, it would just be A min.

Being in the same position is not that important, it's the notes that are played. It's likely the player would just be using accidentals most of the time unless there is modulation; then the scale would change. There is also, perhaps, the possiblilty of pitch axis theory.

Really it's going to be accidentals most of the time I reckon.
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Aug 11, 2010,
#11
Quote by DemoAbrantes
nop thats the basics

I mean, didnt you ever seen a solo that is in the same position on the neck, but uses several "licks" that doesnt fit in the same scale that he did in the lick he did before, its hard to esplain...
Necrophagist, is one band. Its hard to tell hes playing 1 scale, and if you see the tabs, you dont understand shit (at least i dont). check it out
Okay, I really can't understand your question, so I'm just gonna leave it to someone else figure it out. Best of luck to you still!
One day met a and he was all like because he had
never met a before. I told about the powers that this
possessed and he proceeded to it for its magical meat.
Then died. The End.
#12
Quote by Tominator_1991
No, you're right


A lot of Malmsteen's music is written in Phrygian dominant as well, so no it's not just harmonic minor (although Phrygian dominant is a mode of it, it's not the same). I've also heard him using natural minor a lot in his solos.

Afraid I don't understand what the OP is talking about so I can't comment on that.
#13
Quote by Sóknardalr
I've also heard him using natural minor a lot in his solos.

Blasphemy!

Jokes aside, he uses minor scales the baroque way. Harmonic minor for leading tones, melodic minor to avoid the augmented 2nd, natural minor for everything else.
#14
The dude is saying that, some guitarists, like Friedman and Dimebag, don't restrict themselves to just the 7 notes in a scale, but use some chromatics every once in a while to add some spice. I do know that in some solos, Friedman will use the harmonic minor, or phrygian dominant scale for a lick, then connect it to another lick using a sweeping lick in the diminished scale to add tension to the chord changes. Dimebag would use chromatics within the minor scale or pentatonic scale to create exotic sounding scales. Symetrical licks sound really cool sometimes too, like the first fast run in Cowboys From Hell and the very last run in the Tornado of Souls solo. Malmsteen also uses the diminished scale, which is a dissonant sounding scale that sounds like carefully selected chromatics, but is actually a symetrical scale.
Last edited by sober420 at Sep 13, 2010,