#1
So I'm thinking of getting a synthesizer/keyboard/piano and a lot of people say you need to read sheet music to be a good piano player. I mainly want to play the keys cause it seems easier in certain ways to play technical stuff than it does on the guitar.

But would I have to read music to learn the same scales and things i already know on the guitar on the piano as well and to write songs for the piano?

I feel like what I already know about music in general would let me pickup the piano no problem without reading music.
#2
Quote by Stringz of Fury
So I'm thinking of getting a synthesizer/keyboard/piano and a lot of people say you need to read sheet music to be a good piano player. I mainly want to play the keys cause it seems easier in certain ways to play technical stuff than it does on the guitar.

Not at all.

But would I have to read music to learn the same scales and things i already know on the guitar on the piano as well and to write songs for the piano?


To be a competent player, yes.

I feel like what I already know about music in general would let me pickup the piano no problem without reading music.

Not gonna happen.
#3
you can play any instrument without knowing a thing about it. when it comes to music, your ears work quite well, not just your eyes.

that being said, to be a real key player you'll need to be able to read music. if someone hands you a song (sheet music) to play and you have to take the time to count all the lines to find the notes, they'll be laughing.

i know how to play your basic chords on the piano and from my knowledge of music theory i can "write" songs fairly easily, but i do not at all call myself a pianist.
#4
you dont have to read sheet music but there is no tablature for piano
just learn the sheets music
#6
Quote by Stringz of Fury
@DiminishedFifth Quit trollin'

I'm not. You asked questions, and I answered.

You're not going to be able to sit at a piano and just be good with scales and stuff just because you are at guitar. You're not going to even know where the scales ARE just because you know them on guitar. If you don't want to be laughed at by the rest of the musical world you should learn sheet music.

I find piano to be HARDER than guitar because you have to use both hands independently. Technical lines will be MUCH harder right off the bat, especially.

Your theory knowledge on guitar will only be applicable to piano if you can read music. If you can't, then you're left dicking around and figuring things out by ear. Not that that's bad, but it'll SEVERELY hinder you when you need to be able to do things fast.
#7
Quote by Stringz of Fury
@DiminishedFifth Quit trollin'



he's right in some respects

But the piano is an excellent tool for guitarists to come up with chords / riffs etc. and to understand harmony as a whole

Come on DiminishedFifth, of course if you know some theory (chord structures, diatonic harmony) you will be able to play better than someone who has never sat at a keyboard before

and technical stuff would be easier in that sense, but it shouldnt be a substitute for something you cant do
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#8
Quote by Tominator_1991
Come on DiminishedFifth, of course if you know some theory (chord structures, diatonic harmony) you will be able to play better than someone who has never sat at a keyboard before


If you know the notes. Theory will do nothing if you don't know what it's describing.

And yes, I know. I can sit at a piano and improvise some progressions and stuff and I don't play piano... I just know the notes, intervals, and the theory. But TS is stating here he wants to use it as a cop out and doesn't want to put forth the effort to do it right.
#9
Quote by DiminishedFifth
If you know the notes. Theory will do nothing if you don't know what it's describing.

And yes, I know. I can sit at a piano and improvise some progressions and stuff and I don't play piano... I just know the notes, intervals, and the theory. But TS is stating here he wants to use it as a cop out and doesn't want to put forth the effort to do it right.



Yeah, agreed

@TS

- If you are serious about piano, take lessons

- If you are NOT serious about it, do the hard yards on guitar, learn the "technical" stuff - and use the keyboard as a way to learn more about theory as a whole e.g. building chords, interval ear training etc. etc.
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#10
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I'm not. You asked questions, and I answered.

You're not going to be able to sit at a piano and just be good with scales and stuff just because you are at guitar. You're not going to even know where the scales ARE just because you know them on guitar. If you don't want to be laughed at by the rest of the musical world you should learn sheet music.

I find piano to be HARDER than guitar because you have to use both hands independently. Technical lines will be MUCH harder right off the bat, especially.

Your theory knowledge on guitar will only be applicable to piano if you can read music. If you can't, then you're left dicking around and figuring things out by ear. Not that that's bad, but it'll SEVERELY hinder you when you need to be able to do things fast.


I never intended to imply that i thought i could sit at a piano and instantly be good i just don't see how reading music would help me that much because i can figure out scales and stuff in whatever key i want on the piano to me it's just a matter of memorization as it is on the guitar.

I mainly meant things like arpeggios should be easier on the piano because on guitar you have to sweep pick or string skip which can be pretty hard and on the piano its a lot easier to play them.


Also, it's not like i don't know anything about the piano or reading music i have to be somewhat familiar with a keyboard and sheet music for chorus in school so yeah i know very basic things about both.
Last edited by Stringz of Fury at Aug 11, 2010,
#11
You still can't bypass the whole physical part of playing the piano, its a whole different movement for your hands to understand. For one, you'll find that melodies are almost exclusively played with your right hand, which, assuming you're a right-handed guitarist, is only used to plucking strings.

You may have an easier time leeaarrning the piano, but you will still have to learn the piano. Your logic is like me saying I'm in expert in rhythmic patterns and anything music related to beats and tempos, therefore I should be able to sit down and play the drums like Neil Peart (which unfortunately, is not the case.. I've tried).

Also, learn how to read sheet music. It'll take you to the next level of your musical ability (the first level for most musicians except guitarists... and drummers), it will be in no way detrimental, and it's really just a standard to being a decent musicians these days. It's not hard to pick up at all and you won't regret it, I promise.
#12
Quote by NewShred
You still can't bypass the whole physical part of playing the piano, its a whole different movement for your hands to understand. For one, you'll find that melodies are almost exclusively played with your right hand, which, assuming you're a right-handed guitarist, is only used to plucking strings.

You may have an easier time leeaarrning the piano, but you will still have to learn the piano. Your logic is like me saying I'm in expert in rhythmic patterns and anything music related to beats and tempos, therefore I should be able to sit down and play the drums like Neil Peart (which unfortunately, is not the case.. I've tried).

Also, learn how to read sheet music. It'll take you to the next level of your musical ability (the first level for most musicians except guitarists... and drummers), it will be in no way detrimental, and it's really just a standard to being a decent musicians these days. It's not hard to pick up at all and you won't regret it, I promise.


I know I am working on reading music and i know it's a whole different instrument but I am a really quick learner I'm not expecting to be pro at the piano instantly, its just the true reason I am posting this right now is because i have come up with a lot of cool things on the guitar that i think would sound better on the piano.
#13
Well keep at it man, take in and practice as much as you can and if your confidence has reason then I'm sure you're on the right track.
#14
I play both instruments and have so a good ten years or so and basically if you learn to play guitar through memorizing patterns and shapes and the neck, and generally just wing it, it's not going to help you at all, save maybe a little bit of finger dexterity. However, if you know you have your theory down, it will help you tremendously to - and listen to this part - compose, improv, or figure out what to play but in no way is going to help you with the technical aspect. Knowing theory before you play piano would give you the same advantage of having the neck memorized before you play a guitar.

The great thing about piano and synthesizers, is the notes are laid out in such a way that if you know theory it's a breeze. Once you're familiar with the instrument, playing what you want to hear becomes so much easier to apply then it is on a guitar.

As far whether piano is harder to play then guitar, I do not know. Playing keys requires a lot more coordination then guitar. The thing that's most hard about it is your fingers are in reverse order on each hand, so you kind of have to learn to play the instrument in two different ways. Some songs just require you to play an octave with the left hand to support the right, while others require you to do the same thing with both hands (for example Clocks by Coldplay) where performing it with the right hand seems like a breeze but putting the whole thing together, in syncopation with each other and the beat of the song becomes tedious for the beginner. It takes a lot of work. If you don't have dedication and a strong desire to play the piano you'll will probably give up and just stick to guitar.

As far technical parts being easier, most fast parts demands less of the fingers then guitar yes, but if there's runs that span over an octave it requires overlapping of the hands and doing some awkward movement that can be ridiculously difficult. After the amount of time I've been playing I still have difficult doing stuff such as children of bodom synth solos, if that's along the lines of what you're talking about.

Overall, I think piano takes a lot more work at first to become good then the guitar does. It's not like you can learn C, G, and D major chords and bash out 50% of the pop songs of our generation. And it's not like you can throw in a capo to change the key, songs in keys with many sharps or flats can be very difficult, both technically and theory wise if you haven't memorized all those uncommon scales you figured you'd just use shapes for on guitar. With that said, playing piano does open up a lot more melodic possibilities then guitar. All the notes are just laid out in front of you and it's like the world is your oyster, lol.

And on the piano there's less I can't play this chord because my fingers don't reach, I won't be able to play this chord practically, and you have the possibility to play well more then 6 notes in a chord. Also on a guitar you can typically span 2 octaves in a chord, on piano you can typically do 3, and you have the option to do well more then that. Think of piano as playing guitar finger picked, you have the bass played usually with the thumb (left hand on piano) and the melody with the fingers (right hand).
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Last edited by Wiegenlied at Aug 11, 2010,
#15
I think Piano is a good instrument. I also played it many times. It is harder to play than guitar. There are a lot of useful information which is very important for us. Keep it up....
#16
if you know the theory behind the music it isn't necessary to know how to read music to start out. if you know how to build chords and what the notes are on the piano, and the actual notes of the scales, you could pick it up but you're going to actually know the notes on the piano and theory if you expect to just pick one up and play it without being able to read sheets.

if you want to get better and progress though, reading sheets is a must.

Quote by Wiegenlied
I play both instruments and have so a good ten years or so and basically if you learn to play guitar through memorizing patterns and shapes and the neck, and generally just wing it, it's not going to help you at all, save maybe a little bit of finger dexterity. However, if you know you have your theory down, it will help you tremendously to - and listen to this part - compose, improv, or figure out what to play but in no way is going to help you with the technical aspect. Knowing theory before you play piano would give you the same advantage of having the neck memorized before you play a guitar.

The great thing about piano and synthesizers, is the notes are laid out in such a way that if you know theory it's a breeze. Once you're familiar with the instrument, playing what you want to hear becomes so much easier to apply then it is on a guitar.

As far whether piano is harder to play then guitar, I do not know. Playing keys requires a lot more coordination then guitar. The thing that's most hard about it is your fingers are in reverse order on each hand, so you kind of have to learn to play the instrument in two different ways. Some songs just require you to play an octave with the left hand to support the right, while others require you to do the same thing with both hands (for example Clocks by Coldplay) where performing it with the right hand seems like a breeze but putting the whole thing together, in syncopation with each other and the beat of the song becomes tedious for the beginner. It takes a lot of work. If you don't have dedication and a strong desire to play the piano you'll will probably give up and just stick to guitar.

As far technical parts being easier, most fast parts demands less of the fingers then guitar yes, but if there's runs that span over an octave it requires overlapping of the hands and doing some awkward movement that can be ridiculously difficult. After the amount of time I've been playing I still have difficult doing stuff such as children of bodom synth solos, if that's along the lines of what you're talking about.

Overall, I think piano takes a lot more work at first to become good then the guitar does. It's not like you can learn C, G, and D major chords and bash out 50% of the pop songs of our generation. And it's not like you can throw in a capo to change the key, songs in keys with many sharps or flats can be very difficult, both technically and theory wise if you haven't memorized all those uncommon scales you figured you'd just use shapes for on guitar. With that said, playing piano does open up a lot more melodic possibilities then guitar. All the notes are just laid out in front of you and it's like the world is your oyster, lol.

And on the piano there's less I can't play this chord because my fingers don't reach, I won't be able to play this chord practically, and you have the possibility to play well more then 6 notes in a chord. Also on a guitar you can typically span 2 octaves in a chord, on piano you can typically do 3, and you have the option to do well more then that. Think of piano as playing guitar finger picked, you have the bass played usually with the thumb (left hand on piano) and the melody with the fingers (right hand).

+1.

IF you actually know your theory and all that pretty well, and have a good ear and you can hear what you want to play and how you want it to sound in your head. It's only a matter of practice and getting comfortable with the keys under your fingers.
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dude calebrocker, that first song on your list almost made me cry
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Last edited by calebrocker at Aug 13, 2010,
#17
Why wouldn't you want to learn to read music? It's a massive part of learning the piano, stop being lazy.