#1
Ok so in my band I play guitar and sing. But I stutter, so I kind of have trouble introducing songs... What can I do? Just not introduce them? Would it be weird to have my bassist or drummer introduce it? Please help. Thanks alot

-Daniel
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
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#2
Huh, interesting.

If you are having trouble introducing songs and would rather not, it's perfectly acceptable to get another member of the band to introduce it. There are times where other members have to step up to the plate at the microphone, like if the singer gets a bit of nerves, or just to call out something random. It's no biggy.

Edit: I have no idea how stuttering works, but if you have no problem singing, you could sing the introductions to the songs - never seen it done before but it sounds like it would work.
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#3
i would say just nut up and do it. if you are the singer you are already the center of attention so it would be awkward to take the focus off you for such a short amount of time.
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Huh, interesting.
Edit: I have no idea how stuttering works, but if you have no problem singing, you could sing the introductions to the songs - never seen it done before but it sounds like it would work.



Check out For The Sake of Revenge live album by Sonata Arctica. The singer introduces every song with some melody and it's awesome.
#5
It's much more professional to NOT introduce songs in general. If you play mostly covers, have another band member day 'this is a zeppelin song' but nothing really more than that. If you have one original amid covers say 'we wrote this one' and vice versa with 'we didn't write this song.' Have the bassist do it, that's really common with bands that have shy/awkward/trashed singers. Nobody will notice at all.
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#6
Awesome, we play like three covers and the rest originals. I have no trouble when I sing but talking is a bitch lol. We just won't introduce songs then. Thanks
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#7
Well it depends on how bad the stutter is. I mean, if you can say "This next one is called "____" without either little or no stutter, I don't really see a problem with that. If it's really obvious, and you don't feel comfortable doing it, then don't.

Also, you might want to talk to your audience at some point. Not if you're playing to a crowd of 5 people who aren't paying attention, but if you play somewehre with a few people, you might want to say a few things. Not in between every song, but just once in a while so the band gets a break, they can tune up, take a shit, or whatever they need to do. Now if you have a stutter, it may start to bother some people, and for this I'd advise you to have someone else do it.

But in the end you shouldn't worry too much about your stutter, you'll make yourself paranoid thinking about it so much. Just try
#8
Quote by Sid McCall
It's much more professional to NOT introduce songs in general.


I don't think so - it's part of live performance to reveal a bit of your personality to the audience, and that banter between songs can really make the difference between an average gig and a great one.

Sure, it can backfire sometimes, in the cases where the person speaking is being a bit egotistical, but most of the times it's all good.

It is an interesting point regarding cover bands though - should they introduce songs and banter less than an originals band? I'd argue yes. Why? Because usually the band is playing in a pub/wedding to a crowded dance floor or room of people eating. These people don't want to hear people talk over them or long breaks between songs - they'd rather eat their food or get down and boogie! So that's a point I hadn't considered, nice one
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#9
Do you see a speech therapist? Some people I know grew up with bad stutters, but managed to learn how to get around it extremely well.
One trick that one of them told me they use is to translate what they want to say into another language in their head, and then back into English just as they were saying it. Focuses the brain on the translation, rather than the actual act of speaking.
#10
I've seen one in the past, but I live in alaska and theres like only a few here and the one i was seeing retired about 2 or 3 years ago.
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#11
If you don't feel confident enough to talk to your audience, it isn't a bad idea to let somebody else do it. Does anybody do backup vocals in your band? He can talk sometimes, and you can help him from time to time. That's how our band works at the moment, I only do a few clean bridges and stuff, but I talk 80% of the time. Our vocalist doesn't like talking too much, but he also gives his input from time to time, and it works.
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Awesome post, dude.

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#12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dygf8ZxJR8A
I do love how he tends to end Megadeth shows, though. He usually says something like:
"I wanna thank you all for coming down here, I hope you had a great f*cking time, cause we sure did. You've been great! We've been Megadeth! Good Night!"
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#13
Some bands make a point of having a big front man others just present themselves as a group of equals. I personally prefer the absence of the big prima donna. It doesn't matter who does what, there are no rules, this is rock'n'roll. You need to engage with an audience but how you do it doesn't matter.

Our singer is too nervous to talk to the audience and it isn't a problem the guitarist and bass player cover or sometimes the rhythm section just launches into the next song.
#14
How uncomfortable are you about your stutter? Because I know if I went to see a band where the singer stuttered over song introductions, but was clearly turning it into part of the banter (maybe having other band members finish sentences) as opposed to getting progressively more upset by it then I'd definitely think the band was cooler than if I went to see a band where the guitarist or whoever just did all the talking.

The first scenario is unique and not only demonstrates a person refusing to let a disability hinder them, it's demonstrating them actively mining it for comedy. That's just awesome. The only reason the second scenario is unique is because the singer wasn't doing the introductions, and I'd probably forget about that before I left the pub.
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Last edited by Damascus at Aug 11, 2010,
#15
I stutter myself, I just mention it during the show. I'd go like 'Hi, my name is Niels, and I stutter.' I'd make some jokes about it?


#16
Quote by loudog93
i would say just nut up and do it. if you are the singer you are already the center of attention so it would be awkward to take the focus off you for such a short amount of time.


After watching the Rush documentary, I saw some footage of them playing in a high school or something and John Rutsey introduced the band and the song, but of course Geddy sang.

I don't know if it always worked that way in the early years but it does happen.

Once, on the spot at a show, the drummer of the band I was in declared himself "MC" and introduced all the songs.
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#17
In a previous band I (guitarist) did most of the talking and the singer just kept to the singing. Seemed to go fine.

Also, and I know this is a little bit sad, but if you introduce a song and are stuttering all over the place and then sing without a problem it's going to make a majority (I can't back this up with stats, sorry) of the audience take a little bit more interest in the band (not that they wouldn't already of course ).
#18
Quote by AlanHB
I don't think so - it's part of live performance to reveal a bit of your personality to the audience, and that banter between songs can really make the difference between an average gig and a great one.

Yeah, I totally agree about banter and talking, but bands (especially when the frontman/girl is uncomfortable, will just say 'this song is called 'mrs butterworth's 8th grade science class' *look around nervously* okay, here we go!' and that just sucks and looks dumb. Honestly, nobody really cares what the name of your song is if it's an original, and if they want to know they'll shout at you from the crowd or ask you later. This is especially important when you DON'T have a cd or something for people to buy later. Why would they care what the song is called? Unless the song has a really hilariously witty name, then I say don't bother with that. Talk about something interesting, tell a joke, heckle audience members, or drink some water/beer/whatever.

I know I'm coming off like a prick, but I manage bands and I get a lot of audience feedback about stuff like this. My bands and I struggle with the song introductions, because the singers will be uncomfortable in front of large crowds and don't know what else to say. When I'm standing in the audience, the energy is without a doubt LOST when the frontman starts laughing awkwardly and introducing the song.

One time when it DOES work to introduce a song is when there's a sweet instrumental buildup for an intro and the singer yells over it 'YOU SUNK MY BATTLESHIP!' (assuming that's the name of the song) then the music climaxes and the song starts. That looks bad ass.
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#19
If you stutter but wish to still talk between songs, there are techniques you can use. If you imagine that you are singing the words you say, or if you put on a fake voice or think of it as an acting role, this can often work nicely for many stutterers.

Stutterers commonly report dramatically increased fluency when singing, (as you've no doubt already found) talking in unison with another speaker, copying another's speech, whispering and acting also apparently have a dramatic affect, so if you can somehow work some of these into your introductions and banter, you may find that they help.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 20, 2010,
#20
Just make jokes about it and don't worry. If your really nervous tell the crowd 'wow I'm really nervous'. Have other guys in the band introduce it with you like your having a conversation.

I've never played a real show but those are some things I've seen bands do and thought was cool.