#1
Hello UG

Just got my first halfstack, and i wonder how to connect the head to the cab?
Could i just use a regular instrument cable, or should i get some sort of special speaker cable?

/Rasmus
Dutc tape solves all up to equations of 4. degree

Bugera 333xl
Peavey 5150 Cab
TC Electronics G-major
RG1527 w/ Dimarzio X2n-7 and Evo-7
Kramer Voyager
Ltd JH-600 w/ 2 emg 81, floyd rose and S and key inlays
Fender Classic 50 strat
#3
What is the difference? they look exactly the same (speaker / instrument cable)?
Dutc tape solves all up to equations of 4. degree

Bugera 333xl
Peavey 5150 Cab
TC Electronics G-major
RG1527 w/ Dimarzio X2n-7 and Evo-7
Kramer Voyager
Ltd JH-600 w/ 2 emg 81, floyd rose and S and key inlays
Fender Classic 50 strat
#4
Speaker cables are designed to handle the 100-something watts of power that are flowing through them to drive the speakers, guitar (instrument) cables are only designed for the unamplified signal from the pickups.
#5
Okay, good to know
Dutc tape solves all up to equations of 4. degree

Bugera 333xl
Peavey 5150 Cab
TC Electronics G-major
RG1527 w/ Dimarzio X2n-7 and Evo-7
Kramer Voyager
Ltd JH-600 w/ 2 emg 81, floyd rose and S and key inlays
Fender Classic 50 strat
#6
i wouldn't recommend using instrument cable. i did when i was young and didn't know any better, i was very lucky i didn't destroy anything.

speaker cable is the appropriate cable to use for the application.

you just run a the 1/4" speaker cable from a speaker out on the amp to the input of the cab. there is a couple things to pay attention to depending on certain variables. first off, impedance.

-if you have a SS amp then your amp will require a minimum impedance, so you can run any cab above this minimum

-if you own a tube amplifier then you need to MATCH the impedance. this means your amplifier head has speaker outputs with rated impedances (via multiple output jacks or through a switch) and you need to observe these impedance ratings and match a speaker/cab of equal rated impedance. ie: a single 8 ohm out on amp wants an 8 ohm cab, a single 16 ohm out wants a 16 ohm cab.

speaker outs can be more complicated when attaching multiple cabs. so don't just think you plug more speakers and and it'll be all good, you need to understand how to find total impedance in a circuit based on how they are wired together to get a good understanding of what all those speaker outs do and what cabs you can plug where. it's not hard to do either, just a little in depth.

cabs can also have multiple inputs for various purposes. so be sure to plug into the 'correct' jack on the cabinet for your desired results.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae