#1
The x being kill string, how do I play this without it sounding weird? It's a bit from the song "Unholy Confessions" By A7X.

-9
-X
-7
Last edited by StrykVladzimsky at Aug 11, 2010,
#2
You're supposed to not play/mute the string with an X on it. I prefer to do the hybrid picking approach.
#4
dont hybrid pick it, it wont sound good playing unholy confessions and its not logical for that song.
have the finger that is fretting the 7 hit the string under it or use your first finger to play 7 and 3rd to play 9 then use the 2nd to mute the string.
#5
put index on the 7 and ring on the 9. the tricky part is one of those fingers needs to be just touching (not pressing) the X string also. its a pretty common chord type so just keep practicing
#6
you can either put your index on the lowest note and just touch the x string with the rest of the index finger like this:
I = Index Finger
R = Ring Finger

-R-|
-I-|
-I-|

or like this
-R-|
-M-|
-I-|

and just slightly put the middle finger on the string.
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#7
Quote by adambauman31
put index on the 7 and ring on the 9. the tricky part is one of those fingers needs to be just touching (not pressing) the X string also. its a pretty common chord type so just keep practicing


This.
#8
Quote by adambauman31
put index on the 7 and ring on the 9. the tricky part is one of those fingers needs to be just touching (not pressing) the X string also. its a pretty common chord type so just keep practicing


But its not a chord é_è

Do what the rest said. Make sure to whack the strings though, or else you might not pick the ninth fret hard enough to hear it.
Yeah
#9
2 options:
1. play a powerchord but put the 4th finger of your left hand only slightly on the string to mute it
2. hybrid picking: play the lower string with your pick and the other one with your middle finger at the same time
#10
Okay! This is great! I actually think it is a chord, the tabs for it are unholy confessions ver.4 Those are the ones I'm using and I want to learn how to play the little awesome fills.

Great advice from all of you!

Thanks!
Last edited by StrykVladzimsky at Aug 11, 2010,
#11
Those are called octave chords...good luck
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#12
I want to play it on my schools talent show this year. Some 6th graders won it with Hallelujah and it was just awful.
#13
Thats not a chord, a chord is composed of the root, 3rd, and 5th. That is an octave, since those two notes are an octave apart.

Aside from that, the way I play these is to play the 7 with my index finger and lay it over so it slightly touches the middle string and mutes it. Then you can use your ring or pinky for the 9.

BTW thats a fun song to play. Good luck with it
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#14
Mute it, or finger pick the notes

Quote by StrykVladzimsky
Okay! This is great! I actually think it is a chord, the tabs for it are unholy confessions ver.4 Those are the ones I'm using and I want to learn how to play the little awesome fills.

Great advice from all of you!

Thanks!


That isn't a chord, that doesn't even contain more than one note
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Last edited by Msword7 at Aug 11, 2010,
#15
The way I play them is to use index and ring finger to play the octaves and then rest my middle finger over the middle string.

I find it easier to strum all the strings and just mute the unwanted ones rather than aiming to hit just the ADG strings.
Last edited by Calibos at Aug 11, 2010,
#16
Quote by d4man
Those are called octave chords...good luck

Octave dyads actually. A chord is 3 or more notes.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#17
Quote by Junior#1
Octave dyads actually. A chord is 3 or more notes.


can you even call it a true diad? It's really only one note, just at 2 different pitches
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#18
Quote by --{matt}--
Thats not a chord, a chord is composed of the root, 3rd, and 5th. That is an octave, since those two notes are an octave apart.


Noooo, that's a triad, a chord is just three or more notes played at once.
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#19
Quote by Msword7
can you even call it a true diad? It's really only one note, just at 2 different pitches

2 different pitches = 2 different notes. What they're called doesn't really matter as long as they aren't the same note and the same pitch. Octave "chords" are diads. If you played something like 12th fret 6th string and 7th fret 5th string then it would be considered unison because it's the exact same note and pitch.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#20
To watch a true master of "playing the octaves," watch Wes Montgomery.
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