#1
Can anyone explain them to me, im having a hard time understanding them. Mainly how to figure out what they are on sheet music. So can anyone tell me what they are and how to identify them?
#3
Please be more specific as to what intervals you're talking about. There are so many different kinds.
#4
Quote by gquady09
Please be more specific as to what intervals you're talking about. There are so many different kinds.


Not really. An interval is basically just the difference between two notes. For example:

G to G: 8
G to E: b6
A to D: 4
C to F#: #4
etc.

Hopefully the TS has read some of the lessons on intervals that I linked earlier. Basically, you can use intervals to create chords, scales, melodies, riffs, etc. A given interval can have many different applications and sounds depending on the context you put it in. Keep in mind that for a diatonic scale, each of the 7 notes makes up a different interval from the root. Let's use C major for simplicity:

C, D, E, F, G, A, B
or
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

This formula (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) is the formula for the major scale. We can use these intervals to create chords that would work well in the context of C major (usually you stack 3rds to make chords; ie: 1, 3, 5 is C major). Suppose we want to make this a minor scale, we simply flatten the b3 and the b6 to give us:

1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, 7
or
C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, B

You could stack 3rds of this scale to give you chords that would work well in the context of C minor (ie: 1, b3, 5 is C minor).

I'm not going to stack these scales to create the chords, I'll leave that for the TS to practice on his own. The best way to do this is to write these out on the musical staff to see what each interval would look like for major and minor scales, and construct chords from the stacked 3rds. Also, keep in mind that this is only one of the most common applications of intervals, and you could work backwards from a chord to a chord scale.
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#5
Please mention clearly to what intervals you are talking about. You can visited your nearest music coaching class. You can also search for it on Internet in search engine.
#6
First, the number (ex: second, fifth, unison, octave, seventh etc.) is determined by how many letter names it spans (some might disagree, but that's how I was taught, and it works just fine). A to B is a second. A to C is a third. A to F is a sixth.

Edit: Technically it's the lines/spaces on the staff but letter names work too.

The second part of an interval is the quality (ex: major, minor, diminished, perfect)
You determine this by the key signature of the bottom note, and what interval it is.

In a major key, the intervals go like this (all in relation to the root note).

Unison, major second, major third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, major sixth, major seventh, octave.

Unison, Octave, fourths, and fifths are perfect.
Seconds, thirds, sixths, and sevenths are major.

I'll provide an example (in the key of C for simplicity).

They key of C has all natural notes.
C to D is a major second.
C to E is a major third.
C to G is a perfect fifth.
C to A is a major sixth.

C to Ab is a... Well Ab isn't in the key of C so here's how we figure out how to do it. Start with the letters. C to A is a sixth so we know it's a sixth of some sort. If we lower a major interval by a half step, it becomes a minor interval. so C to Ab is a minor sixth.

Lets use a different example.
A to G# is a major seventh. Why? The key of A has F#, C#, and G#. We use that key because A is the bottom note.

If we lower the top note in a major interval by a half step it becomes minor.
If we lower the top note in a minor or perfect interval by a half step it becomes diminished.
It we raise the top note in an interval by a half step, it becomes augmented.

(you can also effectively alter them by changing the bottom note, but I don't want to go there right now)

That should be a fairly good start to intervals if you understood it so far.
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#7
Quote by LordAbbendis
Can anyone explain them to me, im having a hard time understanding them. Mainly how to figure out what they are on sheet music. So can anyone tell me what they are and how to identify them?
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