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#1
I searched and nothing came up. Here is the article:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1302035/Unbeatable-NDM-1-enzyme-make-bacterial-diseases-superbugs.html

Quote by Article
An enzyme that can make any bacteria resistant to antibiotics that has 'an alarming potential to spread' has reached Britain.

Fifty cases have already been reported in the UK, brought in by patients who have had surgery or other treatments in India or Pakistan.

Scientists have warned that the new gene - called New Delhi-Metallo-1 - infects bacteria allowing them to become resistant to nearly all known antibiotics.


Discuss our inevitable death via horrible, incurable disease.

KGBedit: And just so no one is confused, I do not live in England.
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
Last edited by KGB_INC at Aug 11, 2010,
#2
"Young and elderly patients will be particularly susceptible to the 'superbugs', which have emerged recently and are immune to almost all antibiotics."

We have a glimmer of hope.
#3
Daily Mail...

And I fail to see how an enzyme can simply jump into another pathogen as they're suggesting.

And all bacteria will become immune to a specific type of antibiotic given enough time. Unless the antibiotic destroys the entire population of a bacteria, the resistant ones will be able to undergo mitosis and produce resistant strains. We've always known one day our current antibiotics will be useless against certain bacteria.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
Last edited by Todd Hart at Aug 11, 2010,
#4
Quote by geanes
"Young and elderly patients will be particularly susceptible to the 'superbugs', which have emerged recently and are immune to almost all antibiotics."

We have a glimmer of hope.

Apparently it's a gene, like it attaches its self to your DNA but the good thing now is that their are only a handful of people with this. With today's advances they'll have a vaccine or something in no time. This kinda reminds me of when the Swine Flu outbreak first started.
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#5
Quote by Todd Hart
Daily Mail...

And I fail to see how an enzyme can simply jump into another pathogen as they're suggesting.

It's all over the place. I just copy/pasted the first article I found.
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
#6
Seriously, its just this year's must have virus. Bird flu, swine flu, this year it's this. I dont even pay attention now.
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#7
Quote by KGB_INC
It's all over the place. I just copy/pasted the first article I found.


But enzymes really don't work that way.
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#8
My grandma recently died a couple weeks cause of one of these super bugs... . Don't think it was the same strain of virus as the one you're talking about though.
#9
Quote by Todd Hart
But enzymes really don't work that way.

I never said they did. It's just a topic for discussion. Not me claiming that the world is going to end.
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
#11
Quote by dont_cry789
My grandma recently died a couple weeks cause of one of these super bugs... . Don't think it was the same strain of virus as the one you're talking about though.

I'm sorry to hear that man.

I don't think it is. This one is currently in the UK as of now but it originated in India I believe.
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No one is safe from the wrath of Batgirl!
#12
Quote by KGB_INC
I never said they did. It's just a topic for discussion. Not me claiming that the world is going to end.


BUT THE WORLD'S NOT GOING TO END!

Wait...what?

I know, I'm just saying that enzymes just infect bacteria.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#13
Quote by Lt. Shinysides
looks like we wont be hearing from madagascar for a while.

I was tempted to post the picture in the OP.

Quote by Todd Hart
BUT THE WORLD'S NOT GOING TO END!

Wait...what?

I know, I'm just saying that enzymes just infect bacteria.


It said in the article that the enzyme is infecting the bacteria, but it is making it immune to antibiotics.

It's like the bacteria's steroids.
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
Last edited by KGB_INC at Aug 11, 2010,
#14
Quote by KGB_INC
I was tempted to post the picture in the OP.


It said in the article that the enzyme is infecting the bacteria, but it is making it immune to antibiotics.

It's like the bacteria's steroids.


Yeah but enzymes can't 'infect' anything, they're just a protein. The only way an enzyme could potentially infect a bacteria is if the organelle that produced said enzyme began in a similar way to the mitochondria in our cells, that is they started as their own species and became endosymbiotic with the bacteria, which is possible, but unlikely.
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#15
Please let there be zombies. My horror movie fantasy will be fufilled
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#16
There not bullet proof yet...
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#17
Quote by ESPLTDV401DX
Please let there be zombies. My horror movie fantasy will be fufilled

This bug has actually been around a year or so. If that were the case we would all be zombiefied now.
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Lucky I'm a girl and I don't give a damn.

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I've seen her kill a man with a spork and a rubber band
No one is safe from the wrath of Batgirl!
#18
Quote by Todd Hart
Yeah but enzymes can't 'infect' anything, they're just a protein. The only way an enzyme could potentially infect a bacteria is if the organelle that produced said enzyme began in a similar way to the mitochondria in our cells, that is they started as their own species and became endosymbiotic with the bacteria, which is possible, but unlikely.


I see...


*doesn't know shit about the inner workings of the human body*
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
#19
Quote by KGB_INC
I see...


*doesn't know shit about the inner workings of the human body*


Well say one bacteria is a guitar, and produce a wah-wah noise it needs a pedal or modelling amp. Now if this guitar has those plugged in then it can produce that sound. The effect itself is not passable onto another guitar, however the equipment is.

The guitar is bacteria, the wah-wah noise is an enzyme and the pedal is the organelle that produces the enzyme.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#21
Quote by offthewall91
This bug has actually been around a year or so. If that were the case we would all be zombiefied now.

Damn. Oh well maybe I will get lucky next time
e-married to Jack (bladez)
#22
Apparently, NDM1 is a gene that can be passed between bacteria via a process known as horizontal gene transfer.

The bacterium can then produce an enzyme which stops some antibiotics from working.
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#23
Quote by Nutter_101
Apparently, NDM1 is a gene that can be passed between bacteria via a process known as horizontal gene transfer.

The bacterium can then produce an enzyme which stops some antibiotics from working.


Mhmm...I forgot about LGT.

I guess that could be a problem, but still, new antibiotics are developed everyday, I highly doubt that there's any chance this will be any worse than Swine Flu and Bird Flu were.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#24
Quote by Todd Hart
Well say one bacteria is a guitar, and produce a wah-wah noise it needs a pedal or modelling amp. Now if this guitar has those plugged in then it can produce that sound. The effect itself is not passable onto another guitar, however the equipment is.

The guitar is bacteria, the wah-wah noise is an enzyme and the pedal is the organelle that produces the enzyme.

It clicked. I get it now. Thank you.

And to everyone telling me how they aren't reading it because it's the Daily Mail... I didn't post it because I thought that it was canon because a news website posted it at all. I heard about it and copy/pasted the first link I could find with the story so everyone could discuss.

FFS.
KLH & KGB
11/28/09
#25
Quote by Todd Hart
Mhmm...I forgot about LGT.

I guess that could be a problem, but still, new antibiotics are developed everyday, I highly doubt that there's any chance this will be any worse than Swine Flu and Bird Flu were.


The reason for the alert on this is that there are seemingly no plans to develop antibiotics to combat the NDM-1 equipped bacteria. Most of the time, the bacteria are resistant to all antibiotics aside from polymyxin (very toxic) and tigecycline, which has bad side effects for the young and old regarding bone and teeth.

The average healthy adult has little to fear, but the young and the old could be at risk from these.
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<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


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And now on BANDCAMP!


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#26
Quote by Todd Hart
Yeah but enzymes can't 'infect' anything, they're just a protein. The only way an enzyme could potentially infect a bacteria is if the organelle that produced said enzyme began in a similar way to the mitochondria in our cells, that is they started as their own species and became endosymbiotic with the bacteria, which is possible, but unlikely.


You're getting it a bit wrong, the same organelle (called a Ribosome) produces all proteins, and all cells have multiple ribosomes that produce whatever protein they get the RNA for.. The enzyme 'infecting' the cell isn't by a ribosome entering the cell, it's by the gene for the enzyme entering the cell through horizonal gene transfer (pretty much a broad term for any method of transfering DNA from cell to cell). Whoever said the enzyme infected anything phrased it badly. The bacteria recieves the DNA coding for the enzyme which is then incorporated into it's own genome (sometimes it stays as a seperate circular fragment called a plasmid, but that's neither here nor there). It then uses the DNA to produce RNA, which is in turn translated into the protein.

For your guitar analogy in your later post, an acoustic guitar would represent the cell, the strings would represent DNA, the body of the acoustic the ribosome, which produces the sound, representing the enzyme. The strings, which produce a certain tone, can be transferred to another guitar.
Now if only scientific papers used guitar-related analogies.
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#27
Quote by Crofty89
You're getting it a bit wrong, the same organelle (called a Ribosome) produces all proteins, and all cells have multiple ribosomes that produce whatever protein they get the RNA for.. The enzyme 'infecting' the cell isn't by a ribosome entering the cell, it's by the gene for the enzyme entering the cell through horizonal gene transfer (pretty much a broad term for any method of transfering DNA from cell to cell). Whoever said the enzyme infected anything phrased it badly. The bacteria recieves the DNA coding for the enzyme which is then incorporated into it's own genome (sometimes it stays as a seperate circular fragment called a plasmid, but that's neither here nor there). It then uses the DNA to produce RNA, which is in turn translated into the protein.

For your guitar analogy in your later post, an acoustic guitar would represent the cell, the strings would represent DNA, the body of the acoustic the ribosome, which produces the sound, representing the enzyme. The strings, which produce a certain tone, can be transferred to another guitar.
Now if only scientific papers used guitar-related analogies.

Broadly true.
Basically, the gene that makes these bacteria resistant is encoded in a plasmid(a small circular bit of DNA). E. coli are capable of transferring plasmids via a process called conjugation. In short, a bacterium grows a long tube called a pillus through which the plasmid is pretty much jizzed into another bacterium.
That's right, boys and girls. Bacteria have sex.
Last edited by MightyAl at Aug 11, 2010,
#28
Quote by Todd Hart
Yeah but enzymes can't 'infect' anything, they're just a protein. The only way an enzyme could potentially infect a bacteria is if the organelle that produced said enzyme began in a similar way to the mitochondria in our cells, that is they started as their own species and became endosymbiotic with the bacteria, which is possible, but unlikely.


The genes from one bacterium can be transferred into another bacterium. So a bacteria that has the New Delhi-Metallo-1 gene can transfer that into a bacterium which doesn't have the New Delhi-Metallo-1 gene. It's bacteria secks

Quote by Todd Hart
Mhmm...I forgot about LGT.

I guess that could be a problem, but still, new antibiotics are developed everyday, I highly doubt that there's any chance this will be any worse than Swine Flu and Bird Flu were.


Swine Flu and Bird Flu are different, as they are viruses.
#29
Quote by MightyAl
That's right, boys and girls. Bacteria have sex.


Never, ever, make that announcement on /b/. They'll start spreading staph. aureus pr0n round the internet like there's no tomorrow.
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Sir, the contents of my mouth just blew all over my keyboard, desk, and part of my monitor. For the record, it was slightly chewed Keebler cookies and coffee slurry.

The average pitmonkey's response to my jokes.
#30
Quote by Crofty89
Never, ever, make that announcement on /b/. They'll start spreading staph. aureus pr0n round the internet like there's no tomorrow.

I already posted teh microbial porn. I hope I don't get hit with the banhammer.
#31
This may not necessarily be such a big deal though...

The NDM-1 gene has been around for a significant while, and it hasn't wiped out humankind. This tells us two things:

1. It's probably not that contagious.

2. Either other antibacterial methods are effective against the NDM-1 gene, or our immune system can take care of it without any help from pharmaceutical products.

I say bring it on NDM-1!
#32
Quote by pwnerer
This may not necessarily be such a big deal though...

The NDM-1 gene has been around for a significant while, and it hasn't wiped out humankind. This tells us two things:

1. It's probably not that contagious.

2. Either other antibacterial methods are effective against the NDM-1 gene, or our immune system can take care of it without any help from pharmaceutical products.

I say bring it on NDM-1!
Most instances of infection with an NDM-1 carrying bacteria have been relatively minor in terms of the morbidity caused, because the bacteria which carries the gene wouldn't have caused terribly serious disease anyway.
If the gene is transferred into a nastier bacteria(like the ones which British hospitals are hoachin' with), then it'll cause more problems. And more deaths.
And, since the article TS linked to is in the Daily Mail, uncontrolled immigration, crime and the bottom will fall out of the housing market.
#33
Quote by pwnerer
Swine Flu and Bird Flu are different, as they are viruses.


Well doi, I was just saying that this is just another pointless scare, just like they were.

Seems every year we have to have a new death sentence, it's as though some people just can't live their lives without the threat of death hanging over their head.

It's quite sad really.

And MightyAl, there are no doubt already articles in the Daily Mail about how this gene will cause a massive flux in immigration and homosexuality within the UK, causing a massive drop in the number of jobs for all of us and introducing a new form of AIDs into the country that sleeps with your wife and causes a drop in house prices.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#34
haha suckers
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#35
well now I'm confused... the first page was all like: "AAAAAAAAAAAA WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE...... not"

and the second was all scientific stuff which I didn't understand/didn't read

so.......
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#36
Daily Mail

Originating in Pakistan and India


That's all I need to hear.
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#37
Wow, some of you guys are very bad biologists.

Time to get all nerdy on you fools.

Bacteria are just another type of living cell. They produce proteins, enzymes, etc. they do things that are beneficial to our being as well as detrimental to our being. An enzyme for antibiotic resistance doesn't affect us. And in itself is not infectious or contagious.

The bad part of this is that it is very easy to transform DNA into bacteria. Any biology undergraduate student can do it and as a result you can transform this gene into infectious and pathogenic strains of bacteria which is a scary prospect.
#39
Quote by al112987
Wow, some of you guys are very bad biologists.

Time to get all nerdy on you fools.

Bacteria are just another type of living cell. They produce proteins, enzymes, etc. they do things that are beneficial to our being as well as detrimental to our being. An enzyme for antibiotic resistance doesn't affect us. And in itself is not infectious or contagious.

The bad part of this is that it is very easy to transform DNA into bacteria. Any biology undergraduate student can do it and as a result you can transform this gene into infectious and pathogenic strains of bacteria which is a scary prospect.


...What the honest **** are you on about? The whole problem you dope is that if the bacteria gains this gene via Lateral Gene Transfer it will become immune to our antibiotics. If a pathogenic bacteria gains this gene then our antibiotics will be useless in combating it, meaning that those who are elderly, young or otherwise immunodeficient will have a high likelihood of being unable to fight off the infection.

And not 'any biology undergraduate' can turn DNA into bacteria...in fact nobody can. High level biologists with the correct equipment can insert DNA into a bacterial cell to create a new bacterium in a similar way to cloning, but the science is very new and unreliable.

Don't claim people have no knowledge of something and then spew this crap out, please.
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#40
2012 IS THE END OF THE WORLD!!!!!! REPENT! REPENT! ALL WILL DIE on 2012!!!
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