#1
Recently uploaded an old version of Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, and listening to the 2nd track at top volume on my bose surround, I heard what sounded like the popping of a crappy production. However, upon listening more carefully, it sounds more like someone was clapping their hands to the beat underneath the rest of the other instruments. Do you guys hear this or do I just have a crap recording? Look for it around the first chorus. Also, I had really hard time hearing it on my computer speakers, so you might need a decent set of speakers to hear it.
#2
Are you hearing this during the, "Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you, do you want to hear me beg you to take me back", section? because I'm hearing what is either hand claps or the rap of a drumstick on a rim. It's in time and adds some extra snap.
XBOX LIVE Gamertag: Jazz Funeral
Currently killing with The Nunts crew in Max Payne 3

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#3
I think that's exactly the part, I was thinking its rim shots as well but it sounded a little trebbly for my ears.
#4
My crappy laptop speakers are not quite so revealing.
Feel free to call me Kyle.

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I mean in Kyle's case, it is in the best interest of mankind that he impregnate anything that looks at him funny...
#5
Yep. I hear what you mean.

Considering the dates and the tunes the band worked on (1970) ...

  • Bell Bottom Blues, recording Sep 2, overdubs Sep 4 and Sep 9
  • Keep on Growing, recording Sep 1, overdubs Sep 2, Sep 5 and Sep 9


... and the studio's recording log for the kind of instruments that were laying around ...



... those handclaps could might as well be ... high tuned congas !

Now since you can hear the congas, you should also be able to hear in the same parts this ...

Don't you think some toms sound a bit wacky, like ... first loose, then the pitch goes up after the tom is hit ?

Here is a secret passed on to me by the ghost of someone who was there, at the recording:

See what's written in the bottom right corner box of the track layout of the recording log, the last of 16 tracks (who needs more than 16 tracks to make a masterpiece ?) ...

Tunable Toms + Cymb


Tunable toms ? What the heck are those ? Like, aren't all drums tunable ? But why should he mention then "tunable" ? Maybe he means tunable on the fly ?

Some folks here are old enough to remember "roto-toms" and "vari-pitch toms". Roto-toms came out in 1968. Only the roto-toms are quite impractible because they require you to use one hand to change the pitch, which seems impossible to do at the same time while playing the fills which appear to be 2-handed.

And the vari-pitch toms came out only in 1974, 4 years later. So ? What gives ?

The reason why the engineer didn't have any better name for those toms Jim Gordon played is that those were the first he saw.

When the band arrived in the studio a few days earlier, they found laying around the studio a couple of camping air matresses and rubber foot pumps like the one below,



It wasn't uncommon then, that bands on tight budgets would camp, eat AND sleep in recording studios, if the studios permitted it.

Seeing these foot pumps laying around in a corner, Jim Gordon first plugged all the holes but one in the casings of a pair of spare toms, plugging into each casing and gaffa sealing a rubber foot pump. Jim Gordon had just invented the "air induced variable pitch tom"

Every time he stomped the pump, the extra air pressure shot in the casing would increase the skin's tension, hence increasing the pitch of the note that had just been played.

Finally, I hope you enjoy how in "Bell Bottom Blues" Jim Gordon inverted the bass and snare shots, which makes it quite easy to sort out rookie drummers.
Last edited by ColdGin at Aug 16, 2010,
#6
Hey, ColdGin. Good to see you around.
Feel free to call me Kyle.

Quote by ibz_bucket
Just so you know, I read everything you type in a Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs voice.

Quote by tubetime86
I mean in Kyle's case, it is in the best interest of mankind that he impregnate anything that looks at him funny...
#7
Quote by ColdGin
***kickass information***

Wow man, nice. I'll be damned.

As for the ghost, if it's Tom Dowd, tell him I said, "What's up". That guy churned out all kinds of masterpieces, regardless of the number of available tracks. Here's a DVD that I'd recommend to anyone. The guy was ****in' brilliant.

XBOX LIVE Gamertag: Jazz Funeral
Currently killing with The Nunts crew in Max Payne 3

Quote by Weaponized
ON LIGHTNING.
#9
Quote by TNfootballfan62
Hey, ColdGin. Good to see you around.


Hey TN!
How you doing bro ?
Guess what, I'm picking up piano pretty fast. Working on making my dream of retiring as a lounge pianoman come true. Ha :-)===

Quote by Jazz Funeral
Wow man, nice. I'll be damned.

As for the ghost, if it's Tom Dowd, tell him I said, "What's up".

It was Tom Dowd whom I briefly met at Big House Recording-NY while he was recording Popa Chubby's "Booty and the Beast". He was a genius. Worked on the Manhatten world war 2 nuke bomb project.

Right now, he's recording his old buddies like Otis Redding, Duane Allman and Ray Charles at the Great Gig In The Sky. Bless his soul.
#10
Quote by ColdGin
Hey TN!
How you doing bro ?
Guess what, I'm picking up piano pretty fast. Working on making my dream of retiring as a lounge pianoman come true. Ha :-)===


I'm doing good. Keeping busy with a lot of real life crap.

I hope you're being nice to the John Mayer thread crew. I don't go in there anymore.
Feel free to call me Kyle.

Quote by ibz_bucket
Just so you know, I read everything you type in a Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs voice.

Quote by tubetime86
I mean in Kyle's case, it is in the best interest of mankind that he impregnate anything that looks at him funny...
#11
Quote by TNfootballfan62

I hope you're being nice to the John Mayer thread crew. I don't go in there anymore.


We ain't missing much from the last time I've been there.
It's turned in a collector's fan club.
#12
Quote by ColdGin
Yep. I hear what you mean.

Considering the dates and the tunes the band worked on (1970) ...

  • Bell Bottom Blues, recording Sep 2, overdubs Sep 4 and Sep 9
  • Keep on Growing, recording Sep 1, overdubs Sep 2, Sep 5 and Sep 9


... and the studio's recording log for the kind of instruments that were laying around ...



... those handclaps could might as well be ... high tuned congas !

Now since you can hear the congas, you should also be able to hear in the same parts this ...

Don't you think some toms sound a bit wacky, like ... first loose, then the pitch goes up after the tom is hit ?

Here is a secret passed on to me by the ghost of someone who was there, at the recording:

See what's written in the bottom right corner box of the track layout of the recording log, the last of 16 tracks (who needs more than 16 tracks to make a masterpiece ?) ...

Tunable Toms + Cymb


Tunable toms ? What the heck are those ? Like, aren't all drums tunable ? But why should he mention then "tunable" ? Maybe he means tunable on the fly ?

Some folks here are old enough to remember "roto-toms" and "vari-pitch toms". Roto-toms came out in 1968. Only the roto-toms are quite impractible because they require you to use one hand to change the pitch, which seems impossible to do at the same time while playing the fills which appear to be 2-handed.

And the vari-pitch toms came out only in 1974, 4 years later. So ? What gives ?

The reason why the engineer didn't have any better name for those toms Jim Gordon played is that those were the first he saw.

When the band arrived in the studio a few days earlier, they found laying around the studio a couple of camping air matresses and rubber foot pumps like the one below,



It wasn't uncommon then, that bands on tight budgets would camp, eat AND sleep in recording studios, if the studios permitted it.

Seeing these foot pumps laying around in a corner, Jim Gordon first plugged all the holes but one in the casings of a pair of spare toms, plugging into each casing and gaffa sealing a rubber foot pump. Jim Gordon had just invented the "air induced variable pitch tom"

Every time he stomped the pump, the extra air pressure shot in the casing would increase the skin's tension, hence increasing the pitch of the note that had just been played.

Finally, I hope you enjoy how in "Bell Bottom Blues" Jim Gordon inverted the bass and snare shots, which makes it quite easy to sort out rookie drummers.


Very, very cool man. I haven't been around enough lately, but when I get outta the studio later tonight I am going to have to come back and stalk through some of your old posts. This is fantastic, and rare to find this type of relevance on ANY forum.

PS - I have a song called "Fine Bottom'd Yellow Bell-Bottom'd Bombshell" Not quite the topic, but ****ing close enough.