#1
I got a hold of this guitar a long time ago from a mate, I know absolutely nothing about it.

It seems to have been modded a bit , it's got some kind of active Seymour Duncans (running at 18v) with coil tapping, it's got a USA made Kahler floating trem (which is very poorly fitted:\) That's really all I know about it. It's not terribly beat up considering how old I'm guessing it might be? It's got some wear on the back of the neck + body.

Pics:
http://img444.imageshack.us/gal.php?g=kkkkkkkkkkkkkkk019.jpg

I was wondering if someone would be able to help me out with what it might be worth, I don't expect it's an awful lot but it's been sitting around for months without use.

cheers
Schecter C-1 Classic (BKP Painkillers)
Schecter Tempest Custom EMG 81/85)
Jackson DK2M
Boss: Ge-7, DD-7, RV-5, NS-2, SD-1
MXR: KFK 10 Band EQ, Dynacomp, Stereo Chorus
Voodoo Lab Sparke Drive
Bugera 333XL 212 Combo
#2
The guitar was made in Japan, if that makes any difference.
Schecter C-1 Classic (BKP Painkillers)
Schecter Tempest Custom EMG 81/85)
Jackson DK2M
Boss: Ge-7, DD-7, RV-5, NS-2, SD-1
MXR: KFK 10 Band EQ, Dynacomp, Stereo Chorus
Voodoo Lab Sparke Drive
Bugera 333XL 212 Combo
#3
It's probably a 1982-1984. You should be able to check the date on the butt of the neck. It's still a pretty rare Squier even though the pickups and trem have been messed with. I looked up some completed listings on ebay and they range around the $4-500 USD range in original condition(stock).


http://www.squierguitars.com/news/index.php?display_article=99


1982-83: Squier JV guitars

The promise of a new, revitalized Fender dawned in the early 1980s as the dismal CBS era wound down, and concerned Fender officials noted the abundance of Japanese guitar makers who were blatantly copying—in some cases cloning—original vintage Fender designs with great accuracy and low costs, albeit with some occasionally bizarre details.

In one particularly galling instance, for example, one manufacturer used headstock logos closely resembling those of original pre-CBS Fender guitars, but using the words “Tokai” (with a large backward uncrossed “F&rdquo, “Springy Sound” instead of “Stratocaster,” “Breezy Sound” instead of “Telecaster,” “Oldies but Goldies’ instead of “Original Contour Body” and—the last straw—“This is the exact replica of the good old Strat” instead of “Fender Musical Instruments” in small print below the main logo. Ouch.

Fender acted by setting up its own official Japanese manufacturing operation, Fender Japan, in March 1982. A joint U.S.-Japanese venture, Fender Japan produced guitars with material and technical support from Fender’s U.S. facilities; Japanese manufacturing facilities even included factories that had been producing the aforementioned Fender copies. By May, Fender Japan had six vintage instruments—’57 and ’62 Stratocaster models, a ’52 Telecaster, ’57 and ’62 Precision Bass® models and a 62 Jazz Bass®.

Meanwhile, as the flood of Asian Fender copies surged over Europe, Fender sought a competitive low-cost alternative. Accordingly, the long-dormant Squier name was resurrected and assigned to export versions of the new Fender Japan vintage models; these became known as Squier JV (“Japanese Vintage&rdquo instruments. These high-quality models featured minimal design changes, including a small Squier logo on the headstock where the “Original Contour Body” decal normally appeared, and a more cost-effective zinc tremolo block in place of the usual steel one.

These early Squier JV models were produced until late 1984 and are highly sought after among collectors today for their quality and relative scarcity. Soon after their introduction, a new and larger Squier logo appeared, accompanied by the now-familiar “by Fender” logo.