#1
hey there,

first of all i know people progress at different speeds and whatnot.
i've been self taught for almost a year now.. started on bass and then moved to guitar after like.. 4 months cuz i realized i didn't like bass that much.
i took a class and read up on music theory so i know the basics, like how to read music (i can't sight read but i can figure it out) how to form chords and major / natural minor scales... i know enough, more than most guitarists out there i would reckon XD.

basically i was wondering what i should work on next...

- i'm learning chords.. i am working on barre chords as i can't do them cleanly yet, i know the basic chords and how using a capo works so barres aren't.. necessary if i can transpose (thats the word right?) the song, but i still wanna learn them since i know i will need them down the line

- scales.. i learned all positions of the minor pent and know how to move it around, i am beginning to learn the major scale's positions now (have I and II down)

- in the technique aspect, i can do hammer-ons/pull-offs cleanly, i can slide from note to note clearly, my vibrato is pretty good i think, i need to work on making it faster too for certain things though, i was alternate picking from the start so im pretty solid with that, strumming i'm solid... dunno what else to put here

- i can fingerpick pretty well too, but of course, ongoing practice for that too

basically i just need to practice barre chords / chord and scale knowledge / improve vibrato speed / practice all these skills regularly... but if there is anything else i need to know i would love if someone could point it out. i play primarily blues and classic rock. thanks =)
#2
improve all areas. practise what you already think yuve got down.

until youve been playing for 5 years plus, if you think youve got something down, you probably havent. when someone says "im great at that" or "oh, ive learned that now, can we do somethign else?" i think "no you havent/no you dont". every couple of months, i will look back at a couple of beginner lessons, and do them again, just so i dont forget some of the basic stuff that eventually gets lost. i dont teach guitar commerically, but i teach a couple of people, and it is always good to revise what you already know.

learn arpeggios, and extended chords, such as #9 chords, 13th chords, minor9(maj7), chords etc. learn to mix between natrual and pentationc scales, learn syncopation (an awesome technique that sounds great). and awkward time signatures.

work on each suggestion that everyone suggests induvidually, and dont move on until you have it "down" enough so you can improvise with it, and use it without preperation.
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#3
Barre chords ARE a neccessity, I have no idea where this daft idea about capos and barre chords came from but I see it a lot.

Barre chords have a different sound to open chords, they also allow you to easily switch from playing a chord to a melody line further up the neck. More to the point, most songs that use barre chords have them in MULTIPLE places, a capo's no use whatsoever unless you plan on moving it each time the chord changes.

A capo is NOT a substitute for learning barre chords and doesn't really have any relevance to them. A capo is a quick way to transpose the key of your guitar, meaning it's a quick way to play a song in a different key to the one you know it in. It's also a fun way to play around with different sounds, giving you higher pitches on the open strings to play with.

Barre chords are a stylistic choice, you use them because of the sound they have and also because they're a better fit with the rest of the stuff you're playing round them.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com