#1
Hey, just a quick question, forgive me if i sound like a total idiot, it happens a lot

Would playing with the E string on my regular guitar dropped down to a bass register, such to match the A string of a bass cause damage to my amp speaker in the same way playing a bass through it would?

I was just playing around with this heavily dropped bass note for grungey sounds, maybe for blues basslines combined with rhythm. Im using a regular guitar string, only .052, not a bass string on my epi les paul into a vox AC30

cheers for any advice, it might be pretty general knowledge, but i still dont know haha
#3
You won't be able to get it that low and still be able to play it, it will just slop around like wet string in a swimming pool. Any usable tuning won't hurt your amp.
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#4
Uhhhhhhhh........no.

A guitar through a guitar amp will never damage a guitar amp, despite the pitch of the strings, from what I understand, guitar pickups only respond to a certain frequency range, and bass pickups respond to a lower frequency range than a guitar pickup would.
#5
Quote by Cathbard
You won't be able to get it that low and still be able to play it, it will just slop around like wet string in a swimming pool. Any usable tuning won't hurt your amp.

it can be done! It is very floppy but it can be tuned. I've got a song up where i use that tuning AADGBE
#7
awsome, cheers for the replies, so is it just because pickups in a bass fully register the lower frequencies that a regular guitar pickup doesnt that it causes damage?

And to Cathbard, it sounds alright actually, not too muddy, obvioulsy not as clear as if it was in standard tuning, but it works!
#9
Quote by jaybals
awsome, cheers for the replies, so is it just because pickups in a bass fully register the lower frequencies that a regular guitar pickup doesnt that it causes damage?

And to Cathbard, it sounds alright actually, not too muddy, obvioulsy not as clear as if it was in standard tuning, but it works!


Yup, depending on the pickup, guitar pickups usually cut off at around 50-100hz and go through to about 20,000hz, while bass pickups tend to start around 0-20hz and go through prolly about 15,000hz.

I'm totally guessing here, but from what I've heard from most guitars and bass guitar, that's where it sounds like their frequency range is.
#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Yup, depending on the pickup, guitar pickups usually cut off at around 50-100hz and go through to about 20,000hz, while bass pickups tend to start around 0-20hz and go through prolly about 15,000hz.

I'm totally guessing here, but from what I've heard from most guitars and bass guitar, that's where it sounds like their frequency range is.


A guitar/bass circuit is low pass RLC with resonant peak at few thousand hertz and sharp rolloff, so there are no low cutoffs. In fact, due to eddy currents the very lows might be boosted just a little bit on both, especially if there are metal covers. To the original poster, if the string vibrates in the low frequencies and you play loud enough through a guitar speaker, it may break. It doesn't matter what pickup you have.