#1
hi
my band has a gig coming up and we're doing a 3 hour set. I have trouble soloing on some songs since i don't know scales -i do it by the feeling. There's a lot of material and i want to do the best i can. I have some great solos and a wild heavy blues impro which i do very well.
Which option is better:
1. Should i try soloing on songs that i struggle at and risk some missed notes
2. Play rhytm through the solo parts and just keep it tight

We're playing for 100-200 ppl, a non-demanding audience, songs ranging from CCR to Whitesnake, classic rock entertaining set
#2
if you are more comfortable with some than others, do the solo's on the ones you are more comfortable with
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Hello
#3
i dont mean to sound like an asshole here but im going to be blunt.

learn the damn scales and solos and play it right or quit calling yourself the solo guitarist
#4
Quote by rickyj
i dont mean to sound like an asshole here but im going to be blunt.

learn the damn scales and solos and play it right or quit calling yourself the solo guitarist



+1
#5
Quote by rickyj
i dont mean to sound like an asshole here but im going to be blunt.

learn the damn scales and solos and play it right or quit calling yourself the solo guitarist

this x1000
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#6
Quote by rickyj
i dont mean to sound like an asshole here but im going to be blunt.

learn the damn scales and solos and play it right or quit calling yourself the solo guitarist

I learned a good number of solos - not all of which were simple - and could play them spot on before I knew scales or any theory.

Your advice isn't advice - it's a theory that many guiarists prove incorrect.

Not saying theory isn't important, but suggesting that you can't cover a solo - or write one on your own - with any kind of skill without scales is a gross overstatement. More difficult? Yes. Impossible? Not by any means.

As far as my advice to TS - play what you're comfortable with, let the other guitarist do those you're not. If he can't, then a good idea is always to follow a vocal melody as a 'solo.' Fills the space, compliments the song, keeps things moving.
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#7
I'm aware of my lack of theory and I do think I should learn scales. It's just that I barely have time to practice on my own. I work for 10-12 hours a day.

I've been playing for 10 years now on and off and I have a good sense of the fretboard. YES I haven't learn a single scale in 10 years. I figured the pentantonic by myself through trial and error. If I play a song for 5-10 times I will eventually form a solo that fits the song. Thats what I did on most songs during our band practice. For some I took the time to learn the exact solo, but time is short and I can't do all of them.

Our rhytm guitarist is the one who knows scale theory but he doesn't want to play the leads or solo. He always says "nah, you're better", he's shy of doing them. He can't do phrasing or form licks that connect. The more I try to coax him into doing a solo the more he backs away. Furthermore I have a good lead tone and can cover anything with just my amp distortion and a boost pedal. So the spotlight is on me.
#8
If i were you, i would play the solo and risk missing notes.

"The Solo is the essence of a song."
#9
If you're not confident in your improv then why don't you write the solo before hand and just learn it. By "write", you could try improving a solo before hand and just keeping the bits that work and getting rid of the bits you don't. That way you could keep your improv style without risking improvising there and then.

Also, although I do think learning theory is useful, you can easily solo without knowing any scales. You could learn just learn pre-written solos or, if you want to improvise, you could just improve your ear so you learn how to avoid the bum notes.

Edit:
Whatever you do, I would not recomend improvising the solo if your not confident in it. Not playing the solos and playing well will be a lot more impressive than you playing the solo badly.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Aug 13, 2010,
#10
Quote by 12345abcd3
If you're not confident in your improv then why don't you write the solo before hand and just learn it. By "write", you could try improving a solo before hand and just keeping the bits that work and getting rid of the bits you don't. That way you could keep your improv style without risking improvising there and then.

Also, although I do think learning theory is useful, you can easily solo without knowing any scales. You could learn just learn pre-written solos or, if you want to improvise, you could just improve your ear so you learn how to avoid the bum notes.

Edit:
Whatever you do, I would not recomend improvising the solo if your not confident in it. Not playing the solos and playing well will be a lot more impressive than you playing the solo badly.

Good advice.
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you