#1
sorry i make so many threads lol, nobody i know cares or knows abt these things so i talk to you fellow musicians abt it all!

i call this idea "mostly-hypothetical" because if i can ever afford to i'll try it out, but its likely ill never be able to

so i know that some people tune their toms and base drum to bass guitar notes (i know for a fact it works), like they'll tune the base drum to the open E string, the floor tom to open A, and high tom to D, or something along those lines. I know it doesn't really turn the drums melodic...unless you're really going to write a song using only those four notes, which doesn't sound like a great idea to me...but it sounds like a cool idea to tune drums this way.

My question is, if I got 12 toms (or 11 and the base drum), could i tune them all to different notes on the same octave (which would be a low one btw), and then (during only certain sections of a song, where it would sound good) use them melodically? i know it sounds like a ridiculous idea im mostly just wondering if it would really work, ive never even tuned a drum before so im not the expert on this subject haha
#3
Quote by bassist_E1337
could never hurt to try

yeah it could, it'd punch me right in the wallet! lol
#5
yes, you can definitely do that. whether it would be worth it or not is up for debate, though...
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#6
That's pretty much what Terry Bozzio does.
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#7
Sounds like a timpani set to me
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#8
Quote by seemeel
Sounds like a timpani set to me

well there'd still be symbals and a snare
#9
Personally, I don't think it would catch on very well, and I wouldn't spend the money just to do that. But if you think you have a few good ideas like that, and you think it would be worth the money your spending, go ahead!

Quote by seemeel
Sounds like a timpani set to me


similar, I don't think it would sound the same though, dont timpani drums have a very different sound then tom toms?
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Last edited by nbur4556 at Aug 13, 2010,
#11
If you can work the melodic lines into actual percussive patterns and use actual melodic themes in solos and perhaps use them to support the melody, then that would be very creative and fresh use of drums. However melodic drumming is generally covered by steel drums or a timpani set-up like someone said. It's not very original in theory but man the possibilities, if you could put it to good and creative use then I hardly see why not.
#13
Quote by Dayn
Get a xylophone!

haha not the same sound. and my keyboard has a xylophone effect, actually sounds pretty good, i use it in a few songs.

and i think this might actually work! im not gonna try it out any time soon tho haha, i have to get better at drum-tuning, then i have to actually get some damn money lol im frigdin broke
#14
It would not be timpani.

TS, its a cool idea, but not practical. How are you going to set up a kit to have 12 pieces? 5 and 6 piece kits are already almost too much to handle. Also, I dont think they make 11 piece kits, so you would have to have the shells custom made, and that costs a TON of money. To add to that, tuning would be a nightmare. I mean, getting them in pitch would be easy, but getting a good sound would be really hard. Not to be a debby downer, but I cant even see a god tier drummer being able to make it work

But, on a side note, Western Michigan university has a drum choir. Theres always 5 or 6 drummers playing, and they all have their toms tuned so that they can outline the melody to the song their playing. I encourage you to check though out. I heard them play and they are great; I was especially impressed that I wasnt deaf afterward.
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Aug 14, 2010,
#15
Quote by tubatom868686
It would not be timpani.

TS, its a cool idea, but not practical. How are you going to set up a kit to have 12 pieces? 5 and 6 piece kits are already almost too much to handle. Also, I dont think they make 11 piece kits, so you would have to have the shells custom made, and that costs a TON of money. To add to that, tuning would be a nightmare. I mean, getting them in pitch would be easy, but getting a good sound would be really hard. Not to be a debby downer, but I cant even see a god tier drummer being able to make it work

But, on a side note, Western Michigan university has a drum choir. Theres always 5 or 6 drummers playing, and they all have their toms tuned so that they can outline the melody to the song their playing. I encourage you to check though out. I heard them play and they are great; I was especially impressed that I wasnt deaf afterward.

im only gonna try it out if im stinkin rich someday haha, then ill spend however much time i need to figure out how itll work. it'd probly go 360 around me kinda like Neil Peart's set without the electric stuff (unless i can somehow fit electric stuff too haha). i wouldnt have to be great at manuvering (i spell like shit) around the entire set, i'd only use a few closer notes when im doing that at all, i wouldnt just be shredding random solos and expect them to be in key haha.
this is why its "mostly-hypothetical" im poor and always will be and will never get the chance to try this out but at least now i know a bit abt the ups and downs in case someday i could try it
#16
Quote by TMVATDI
im poor and always will be and will never get the chance to try this outt

It's called getting a job and saving your money.
Instead of blowing your spare money on stuff you really don't need, put it away towards drums.
It's not rocket science.
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#17
This is sort of done in pop music, especially electronic pop music, and was pioneered in hip hop (I think). The producer will tune the bass drum electronically to fit better with the song.

To TMVATDI
Download or buy a DAW, download some drum samples, tune them with the DAW's wave editor, apply them to a piano roll or musical staff. It wouldn't sound very human, but it would do the job.
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        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
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#18
Quote by TMVATDI
sorry i make so many threads lol, nobody i know cares or knows abt these things so i talk to you fellow musicians abt it all!

i call this idea "mostly-hypothetical" because if i can ever afford to i'll try it out, but its likely ill never be able to

so i know that some people tune their toms and base drum to bass guitar notes (i know for a fact it works), like they'll tune the base drum to the open E string, the floor tom to open A, and high tom to D, or something along those lines. I know it doesn't really turn the drums melodic...unless you're really going to write a song using only those four notes, which doesn't sound like a great idea to me...but it sounds like a cool idea to tune drums this way.

My question is, if I got 12 toms (or 11 and the base drum), could i tune them all to different notes on the same octave (which would be a low one btw), and then (during only certain sections of a song, where it would sound good) use them melodically? i know it sounds like a ridiculous idea im mostly just wondering if it would really work, ive never even tuned a drum before so im not the expert on this subject haha


Why don't you just use a pitched percussion instrument? Something like marimba/hang drum/maybe even timpani would be way better for this...and you also have to take into account that drums have almost 0 resonance for pitches--generally it's the overtones that help the drum get its sound
Last edited by justaramsfan at Aug 14, 2010,
#19
Quote by justaramsfan
Why don't you just use a pitched percussion instrument? Something like marimba/hang drum/maybe even timpani would be way better for this...and you also have to take into account that drums have almost 0 resonance for pitches--generally it's the overtones that help the drum get its sound

well i kinda wanna do it with symbals and a snare and all that stuff you usually see on a drumset, but maybe i could hook up symbals anda snare to a timpani?? i've never used timpani before so idk...

edit: somebody please explain to me how to quote multiple people at a time, it'd be a lot easier if i knew
Last edited by TMVATDI at Aug 14, 2010,
#20
Is tuning the drums really that important?
I'm ignorant on that part, but I never heard anyone go.. "damn, those drums are out of tune"
#21
Quote by ShadesOfGray
Is tuning the drums really that important?
I'm ignorant on that part, but I never heard anyone go.. "damn, those drums are out of tune"

haha, no drum tuning really isnt important at all, and im no expert but im pretty sure the purpose isnt to get a specific note, its to just get the desired sound. actually my toms sound horrible right now because ive never tuned them! tuning drums to specific notes isnt really common as far as i know, they're just tuned to where they don't sound bad, like if you've never ever tuned your drums after an extended period of time, the head will just be kinda...idk...flimsy, it wont resonate well. on the other hand, if you tuned it too tight...um well i guess something could break?

im mostly guessing here, ive never tuned drums haha
#24
Quote by TMVATDI
haha, no drum tuning really isnt important at all, and im no expert but im pretty sure the purpose isnt to get a specific note, its to just get the desired sound. actually my toms sound horrible right now because ive never tuned them! tuning drums to specific notes isnt really common as far as i know, they're just tuned to where they don't sound bad, like if you've never ever tuned your drums after an extended period of time, the head will just be kinda...idk...flimsy, it wont resonate well. on the other hand, if you tuned it too tight...um well i guess something could break?

im mostly guessing here, ive never tuned drums haha


The looser the tuning the lower the pitch, and the tighter the tuning the higher the pitch...you can't break a drum head, and you always tune to a note--every sound you make is technically a note. Some people like to tune their drums to where they sound good, and then go back to figure what pitch it's tuned to so they'll always know how to get that sound

Tuning drums is as important as tuning a guitar--and since you can't use a tuner to tune a drumset the only way to get good at tuning is to practice tuning

Also, you can put cymbals and a snare anywhere...they don't attach to drum sets, they float out beside the kit so you can use them with a pitched percussion instrument too...
Last edited by justaramsfan at Aug 15, 2010,
#25
Just get 2 toms, 1 floor, 1 bass, and 1 snare and tune them all to Em pentatonic. Success!

Worst case scenario: It doesn't work, so you're left with a complete kit - cymbal.
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#26
ari hoenig does stuff like this:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QeW8gKf07U.
he doesnt get exact notes though, he more just goes by the contour of the melody (high to low, low to high).
you could also get a few timpani (a regular set is 4 i think, and you can change their tuning with a pedal on the drum, letting you change tuning mid set or even mid song).
#27
Check out Blue Man Group's albums, Audio and The Complex. They work with a lot of melodic drumming, though the "melody" is often a machine-like descent down the scale or something. They cut lengths of PVC pipe to achieve diatonic tones.

I dig the music and throw it on every once in a while.

What you are proposing is not weird at all, though. Marimba, Xylophone, and even the Piano are considered, technically, percussion instruments - if Percussion is defined as a musical instrument imbued with vibration via the striking of a hammer or similar device.

Even guitar is somewhat percussive.
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