#1
Alright, so I was reading Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar series and in one section, he mentions an exercise for locating notes on the neck. It's basically

1. Pick a couple notes.
2. Locate them up and down the neck.

My idea is a spin-off of that.

1. Pick two notes no further than a whole step apart from one another.
2. Spend five minutes locating them up and down the neck to a metronome set at quarter note = 30 BPM.
3. The next day, add another note that is no further than a whole step apart from one of the previous day's notes and locate all three for five minutes.
4. The next day, repeat the process for a total of 4 adjacent notes located.
5. The next day, repeat again for a total of 5 adjacent notes located.
6. After that, start over with a different two notes and repeat the whole thing.

My reasoning behind this is that your brain will learn better this way since it's gradually associating the notes with other notes.

As far as my practice schedule goes, I spend the first 20 minutes doing warm-ups which consist of single string, positional, and "diagonal" chromatics (for diagonal, it's the one Justin Sandercoe calls "the spider", aka the one Steve Vai gave to Joe Satriani) as well as, you guessed it, this exercise. I do each one for five minutes then move on to more musical things.

I've only been doing this for a couple days so I can't say how well it'll work, but if anyone else wants to try this little experiment, please post your results here. I will do the same.
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Aug 13, 2010,
#2
i would had i not spent the first few weeks of my guitar playing career to learn where all the notes were
#3
Quote by supersac
i would had i not spent the first few weeks of my guitar playing career to learn where all the notes were




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#4
Yeah.. I've been putting it off forever :< Pretty stupid of me, but I was one of the players that was content to just play other people's stuff for the longest time and it was only in January that I really started digging in to theory.
#5
If you don't know theory, you are mediocre guitarist, just playing to show off...

There's

NEVER

enough

GAIN


#6
Sweet response man. Thanks for that enlightening comment. You know, from my experience, those guitarists that like to put down other players for whatever reason are usually pretty insecure about their own playing.

I just want to know the notes cold. Like, the back of my hand cold. No hesitation.

Here's a test for you: put a metronome to 100 BPM, and on every click, locate an F# anywhere on the neck until you've found them all without missing a beat.

I want to know the neck like that, for every note. That's my goal.
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Aug 13, 2010,
#7
Lol, sorry if u got offended, I was talking to the other guys, I mean i'm not a theory master but im on the process, but you weren't the target, soz.

There's

NEVER

enough

GAIN


#8
Quote by Damaged Roses
If you don't know theory, you are mediocre guitarist, just playing to show off...



If you say this you are the biggest douchebag ever, just showing off.

I think you have a good point here TS however I already know all the notes on the fretboard i think that choosing just 1 or 2 notes per day and exercise finding them every click is a good exercise It takes time, but once you learn the patterns of the notes on the strings it becomes very easy. Just learning on the E and A strings is enough if you know how the octaves work...
#9
What I mean is that i don't really understand people that play guitar (or any other instrument) and they don't really care about how it works (concerning to music), what's behind all of that cool riffs and solos, how can someone expect to master something if they don't even know the base?

There's

NEVER

enough

GAIN


#10
I'm a good guinea pig for testing I've been using Fretboard Warrior but its going somewhat slowly so maybe this method will help out. Sure I will try this, I'll begin tonight, I hope your method works well.
I iz moderatin teh forums on this site.
#11
Zanon -

Thank you for your constructive comment.

The thing is, I do have the notes down cold on the E and the A strings. It's just that I DO have to use octaves to find the notes on the D, G, and B strings and its frustrating because when I am improvising and searching for a note to end a phrase on, a lot of times I can't find that note in time for the chord change when it's an uptempo backing behind me.


damagedroses -

I forgive you, I understand text is not a medium that can convey a lot of information.

I will remind you that a lot of people (like myself) started playing guitar because they liked music and they simply wanted to play songs they enjoy.
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Aug 13, 2010,
#12
learning to read music always helps since you have to leanr the notes

learning simple riffs at first then building up will help
#13
I've been suggesting a similar method to people for the last couple of years :p

It's the most logical way of doing it, the issue is never with the notes you know, it's the notes you don't know. And it's never a case of not knowing those other notes, most people can work them out eventually, it's just a bit fiddly. So the most sensible thing to do is increase the number of notes you know in a way that keeps reducing the number of notes you need to count along, until eventually you know more notes than you don't and the ones you haven't memorised you kind of know by default because they aren't the other ones.

Most people know the open strings and the octaves at the 12th, so straight away they only ever have to count aloing 6 frets at most. Add in the notes we use to tune the guitar by at the 5th fret, plus the octaves on the 7th and their octaves (accounting for the shift on the B string) and already no notes are more than 2 frets away from one you already knoe making it pretty simple to count along. Once you're at that point it's not long before you know them all.
Actually called Mark!

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#14
Intresting, would have tried it out if I hadnt already made good use of the fretboard warrior program though..
#15
Quote by Damaged Roses
If you don't know theory, you are mediocre guitarist, just playing to show off...


Theory has almost nothing to do with how good of a guitarist you are, it will help you be a better musician, which can indirectly help your guitar playing, but you can't say someone is a mediocre guitarist because they don't know theory!
Quote by leg end

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Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#16
Quote by Damaged Roses
If you don't know theory, you are mediocre guitarist, just playing to show off...

ummm yeah

Quote by STONESHAKER
Alright, so I was reading Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar series and in one section, he mentions an exercise for locating notes on the neck. It's basically

1. Pick a couple notes.
2. Locate them up and down the neck.

My idea is a spin-off of that.

1. Pick two notes no further than a whole step apart from one another.
2. Spend five minutes locating them up and down the neck to a metronome set at quarter note = 30 BPM.
3. The next day, add another note that is no further than a whole step apart from one of the previous day's notes and locate all three for five minutes.
4. The next day, repeat the process for a total of 4 adjacent notes located.
5. The next day, repeat again for a total of 5 adjacent notes located.
6. After that, start over with a different two notes and repeat the whole thing.

My reasoning behind this is that your brain will learn better this way since it's gradually associating the notes with other notes.

As far as my practice schedule goes, I spend the first 20 minutes doing warm-ups which consist of single string, positional, and "diagonal" chromatics (for diagonal, it's the one Justin Sandercoe calls "the spider", aka the one Steve Vai gave to Joe Satriani) as well as, you guessed it, this exercise. I do each one for five minutes then move on to more musical things.

I've only been doing this for a couple days so I can't say how well it'll work, but if anyone else wants to try this little experiment, please post your results here. I will do the same.


If it helps you thats great, but personally I think it's best to deal with the issue in the context of music. reading music in all the various positions will give you this kind of experience.

regarding the "spider" exercises.....Non-musical exercises lead to non-musical playing.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 14, 2010,
#17
I agree; non-musical exercises lead to non-musical playing.

That's why non-musical technical exercises only make up 15 minutes of a 2+ hour practice schedule. About 12% of my energy is devoted to that.

It is my opinion that there is a place for non-musical exercises in practice. Steve Vai has also expressed this sentiment in one of his articles, although he has given them even less priority -- 1 hour in a 10 hour practice schedule, or 10%.

I stand that these exercises have made my playing more musical by increasing my technical ability - I can now play faster runs more consistently at faster speeds than I could before, my playing has become much more relaxed (esp. in my picking hand), my timing has continued to improve, my dynamics are improving, and my playing is getting cleaner and cleaner.

See, the thing I left out is how I actually practice those exercises.

Usually, I will take 2 clicks to play each note at a tempo where I won't mess it up once. During the first click, I play the note. During the second click, I mute the note I just played while fretting the next note and bringing the pick to the next string. This approach has helped me build up control.

The other thing I do with these exercises is leave my fingers on the note they last fretted until it is time for them to move again or they simply have to move, i.e. 1-3-2-4 up each string, you'd have to lift your ring finger. This builds my left hand economy of motion and finger independence.

The last thing I do is alternate between accenting notes loud, regular, soft, regular, essentially taking a musical exercise and trying to make it more musical.

That about sums up my reasoning for doing this, the last reason being that those exercises do serve as a good warm-up, especially when played slowly and carefully.

As far as sight reading to learn the notes... well, yeah, that makes great sense and you'd be killing a few birds with one stone. That's why this is an experiment; I know from psychology that the brain learns better if it can associate new facts with facts it already knows, which is where I got the idea. Of course, your way also uses this since when you sight read a chord, you associate the new facts (the notes contained in it, the location of the notes on the staff... well, for me anyways) with the chord shapes you (I) already know.

And as much sense as that makes, I think I have some sort of aversion to sheet music because I think I would be more comfortable knowing the notes better first. I don't know why.

/rant
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Aug 14, 2010,
#19
Quote by Damaged Roses
What I mean is that i don't really understand people that play guitar (or any other instrument) and they don't really care about how it works (concerning to music), what's behind all of that cool riffs and solos, how can someone expect to master something if they don't even know the base?


Define "mastering".

If you mean mastering every technique, I'd say have a look at Francesco Ferari.

And you know what? The dude couldn't write a decent song to save his life.


Most people don't want to master it, they aren't freaks like most virtuosos, they are trying to have fun.
#20
Hell, I haven't learned note placements yet. I'll give this a shot and get back to you.
#21
i know where all the notes are in the key of C...which makes me feel very stupid because knowing that, the other's should be easier to find too, right? well they arent for me...as i am retarded...
#22
In defense (somewhat) of 'Damaged Roses', I would say that understand the theory of music isnt just something about reading books and being concious about all the things.. a lot of people say the dont use theory at all but they still kinda instinctivly use / understand the things that make music work.

What most people call theory is nothing more than a way to describe what most people already hear and feel from music, but in such a way that you can analyse, learn and discuss it efficiently. Like the difference between calling something 'that sad sounding chord' versus 'that chord containing a flattened 3rd' and perfect fifth'.

If you look at it that way, not knowing theory would mean neither knowing nor feeling the music.. then you'd just mash random notes and hope something clicks. That, I would indeed call a failure as a musician
#23
I'm gonna try this out too, I've been trying to find a way to figure this out for a while, but nothings worked for me yet. I'll pm you to let you know how its going later.
"When that day comes I shall Futterwacken ... vigorously."
~ The Mad Hatter



#24
guitar - being illogical - and yet one of the easiest to play hundreds of songs with only knowing 5 or 6 chords..

its not just knowing the notes and their locations...its the tedious study of their relationship to all the other notes on the other strings..

so learning the notes is the easy part..its the reinforcement - theory - scales - chords - harmony - sight-reading - that bonds it all together..

you may find that even when you know where all the notes are..by themselves...when you do a chord study..lets say...CMA7 and its inversions in all positions...the same slow pace of learning the notes AGAIN will arise...because of a different context..this time chords...and then scales in all positions...did i mention intervals..wide spaced ones on different strings ...

the learning process on the fretboard - unlike a keyboard - takes much longer to really ingest fully...dont be discouraged when you think you know where all the notes are only to find you have to slow down to find them in a different learning application..

patients & determination are required to master the fretboard...

play well

wolf