#1
After watching John Mayer's performance of "Belief" on Where the Light Is, I discovered that's how I wanted to play guitar. However, after a few years of studying pentatonic scales and (sorta) transcribing blues standards, I...have hit an odd spot.

I've always wanted to be good at improvising, really. But sometimes, when I try to, I don't "feel" the notes--it's like I'm playing something rehearsed (which is not what improv is about). And nowadays, I feel I'm playing the same stuff. Sometimes, I'll check tabs, but I can't sit still enough to learn them in full.

Any advice?
#2
practise really...after a while you will get good at it.

also try to play covers but improvise pieces or make them into jams. changing stuff here and there
#3
Do you actually know the notes? Or do you just know shapes on your fretboard? The word feel is a misnomer, good guitarists don't "feel" the notes, they simply understand them very well. They know the sounds they're going to get when they put their fingers somewhere, they know how different notes work togeter and theny know how its going to affect the harmony of the song.

Sure, you want your music to reflect your feelings and emotions - but the only way to do that is to know the instrument inside out so you know exactly what it is you need to do to convey those emotions.
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#4
Quote by steven seagull
Do you actually know the notes? Or do you just know shapes on your fretboard? The word feel is a misnomer, good guitarists don't "feel" the notes, they simply understand them very well. They know the sounds they're going to get when they put their fingers somewhere, they know how different notes work togeter and theny know how its going to affect the harmony of the song.

Sure, you want your music to reflect your feelings and emotions - but the only way to do that is to know the instrument inside out so you know exactly what it is you need to do to convey those emotions.



This.

I could never get my solos to sound (melodically) like other blues / rock players, simply because they were soloing with more than just the block shape in one spot on the neck
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#5
Chord tones.

A lot of players, like Mayer, think about the harmony they're playing over and how they can "manipulate" it or "use it to their purpose".....

There are all kinds of chord extensions you can add to a pentatonic that'll give you different tensions and resolutions.... look for those when learning someone's solo.... that'll give you the harmonic purpose as opposed to just the "map" of where the notes are to be played...
Hope that helps!
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Do you actually know the notes? Or do you just know shapes on your fretboard? The word feel is a misnomer, good guitarists don't "feel" the notes, they simply understand them very well. They know the sounds they're going to get when they put their fingers somewhere, they know how different notes work togeter and theny know how its going to affect the harmony of the song.

Sure, you want your music to reflect your feelings and emotions - but the only way to do that is to know the instrument inside out so you know exactly what it is you need to do to convey those emotions.



No, I cannot recognize notes. I can recognize chords though...
#7
I have the same problem. In fact, I think I posted pretty much this exact thread about a week ago.

Try this:
Think of one note at a time. Try to play a solo, and force yourself to not use any single note out of instinct. Think about each movement. Better yet, think of a whole melodic phrase before you play anything at all. This is hard to do, but with experience you can get better at it.

Now, you may not get a masterpiece solo from the start, but it will train you to not play notes out of instinct (muscle memory of a pattern).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by food1010
I have the same problem. In fact, I think I posted pretty much this exact thread about a week ago.

Try this:
Think of one note at a time. Try to play a solo, and force yourself to not use any single note out of instinct. Think about each movement. Better yet, think of a whole melodic phrase before you play anything at all. This is hard to do, but with experience you can get better at it.

Now, you may not get a masterpiece solo from the start, but it will train you to not play notes out of instinct (muscle memory of a pattern).


^ good advice


spend time playing only what you hear. use your ear rather than muscle memory.


Quote by captainsix
Sometimes, I'll check tabs, but I can't sit still enough to learn them in full.

Any advice?


Ths is definitely part of the problem.

learn songs/solos in their entirety. Don't read the tab..... memorize. Internalize the music.

The well needs to have something in it if you expect to draw from it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 14, 2010,