#1
So I went to a concert last night and sat front row, right near the very, very loud speakers for a couple of hours. When I leave the place my ears start ringing (which is normal) but when I woke up today they were still ringing. Anyone know if this is normal? Will it be permanent and effect my love of music?
#3
If it's still there in the morning your ears should ''rest'' for two weeks so don't go to extremely noisy places. And the next time wear hearing protection otherwise you will have permanent ringing ears.
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#4
Ringing ears means your ears are damaged. Put earplugs in next time.
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#5
Use earplugs next time.
Don't listen to your stereo/iPod super loud.
If the ringing continues, get a bottle of Ring Relief.
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#7
  • Get A Sound Lever Meter (they are available at Radio Shack and other outlets)
  • Set it for "Slow" response and "A" weighted
  • Never-ever let anything more than 85db into your ears - wear ear plugs with the correct value to reduce the sound to 85db or less (This goes for listening to your TV, Music, and everything else.)


You are doing permanent damage to your ears. When you get older and your body is not as flexible as it is now, the damage will result in hearing loss (if it hasn't already). The hearing loss will show up at the higher frequencies first. You won't notice it until you no longer can understand people talking to you because consonants like B, D, T, and P or S, F, V and others start sounding alike. By then your guitar will sound dull, you will have difficulty hearing the cymbals of the drum set, and you may have constant tinnitus (ringing) in your ears that will never-ever subside.

Etymotic makes nice musicians ear plugs. They are high fidelity and don't cut the treble down like those foam things http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/erme.aspx http://www.westone.com/catalog/etymotic-ety-plugs (I have no business connection with Etymotic, I am a customer). If you are a pro musician, the custom fit ones are best, if not, universal fit ones will be fine (and less expensive).

Your ears are your most important musical instrument. Protect them.

A word to the wise, accept it or ignore it, it's your choice.

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#8
Quote by beatleshendrix9
When I leave the place my ears start ringing (which is normal)
You're kidding right?
#9
Quote by Notes_Norton
and you may have constant tinnitus (ringing) in your ears that will never-ever subside.

I used to have tinnitus and it's not fun, especially when you're trying to go to bed and everything is quiet except your ears.

But, fortunately I was lucky enough to catch it when I did and through being smart about my hearing (wearing earplugs, not just at concerts, but when around anything loud/not cranking up my iPod or anything involving headphones/etc.) and using medication in my ears, it's gone away and hasn't come back since.
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#10
Back when I was reading Guitar Player regularly, Jeff Baxter (Doobie Brothers) wrote a column titled "It's Too Loud". He pointed out that many rock bands wore ear protection to protect their hearing, and yet were producing sound levels of 115-120 Db in the first few rows of the audience.
This is more than sufficient to cause permanent damage....
I have tinnitus as a result of shooting, rather than playing music too loud. It's annoying.
#11
Please, do yourself a favor and wear ear plugs! There are huge implications later in life if you do not protect your hearing now. How do you expect to put out great music later in life if you can't hear it?
I am not doubting your ability but the odds are against you if you loose your hearing because I only know of one Beethoven.

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#12
Give it a few days. Wear ear plugs next time, REAL ear plugs ... not pieces of foam.
#13
You know the sound of ringing ears? Well, that's the frequency you'll never hear again, so enjoy that particular frequency while it lasts..

When your ears ring, it means your hearing got dammaged. Probably by a small insignificant way, but it add up overtime, especially if you're a musician.

So remember to wear plugs at the least next time. You can buy reusable frequency accurate plugs. They're a bit more expensive than the factory worker type, but the dampen the volume / intensity of what gets to your earddrums without distorting the sound.
#14
Everyones saying get ear plugs, good advice, but best way to go about it is to get some Musicians earplugs, mine were about £15, take away 20db, but not affecting frequencies so everythings still clear...
You can also splash out on some really really good ones, that are moulded to your ear (Not sure where you get them though) but they are the best you can get.
#17
It's called tinnitus, and because it seems to end in "itus" like "sinusitus" people think it's an infection.

It's a symptom. It can be a symptom of hearing loss, of drinking too much, of getting punched in the head, or of nothing at all.

It is harmless, but annoying, and in extreme cases can cause a moderate handicap as it affects your ability (obviously) to hear.

As far as damage goes, you have to assess what dosage you are comfortable taking and how much deterioration you are comfortable accepting later. I would argue: and this is going to be a controversial argument that hearing loss is a reasonable consequence of being a musician and enjoying music. How much loss you take by, say, 65, is up to you, but consider this:

You can't correct it. You can go to the "doctor," ie Audiologist, but they can do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to fix it. Like an Optician they can give you some sort of device to compensate for it, but essentially you're screwed. Hearing gone. Not coming back. So my feeling is if your hearing loss is not affecting your health, happiness or career, don't sweat it.

What's the point?

Mild deafness ("hard of hearing") is a common problem. While you don't want it, you don't want bad knees, either, or false teeth, or any number of ailments. The body is impermanent and frail, and one of its frailties is that the hearing goes.



We are mortal, so we are going to get old, fall apart, and die.

Some people enjoy a pipe. Some people smoke 10 packs a day and die of lung cancer.

Some people pair a fine Chardonnay with a light, summery cheese. Some people end up offering blow jobs for a bottle of cheap, grain alcohol.



It's a matter of degree. The occasional pipe smoker and the wine taster will have lung and liver damage, respectively.

So?

If you are one who enjoys music as I do, then accept that this activity will slowly diminish your ability to hear sounds beginning with the highest frequencies and proceeding eventually to the speech range, wherein you begin to have trouble hearing and understanding, you guessed it, SPEECH!

Well, to those who spout warnings about "NO SOUND ABOVE 85 dB" I say, "well, then send out our fleet of F-15 bombers and destroy every Symphony Orchestra and Opera house ever built" because the decibel levels reached in a fine orchestra hall reach well over 85 dB. I've heard of horn sections at the Chicago Symphony exceeding 120 dB!!



They have a world-class horn section.

It's accepted that football players will suffer trauma to the joints and several concussions during their career. We applaud them and offer them millions of dollars to entertain us with their sacrifice, which leads to eventual disability and dementia.



I accept that I am damaging my ears by listening to music, and if it's good music, for example a particularly powerful movement for the horns at the Chicago Symphony, then it is well worth it. I will be damaging my frail ears for a purpose of enjoying some of the most wonderful music ever composed.

Yet when a garbage truck rumbles by I put my fingers in my ears. When a couple gets into a screaming match at a restaurant, I put my fingers in my ears.

You have to be a "connoisseur" of sound, if you will.

Just as a drinker of fine wine accepts perhaps a mild cirrhosis when he/she dies at a ripe old age of unrelated causes, an aficionado of fine music can likewise expect a bit of uncomfortable ringing and probably some difficulty understanding others late in life as well.

Being totally irresponsible and destructive about your lifestyle is dangerous, but enjoying the finer things, even at the cost of just a tiny bit of our own youth and vitality, is well worth it.

One would have to live a horribly dull, sheltered and empty life indeed to keep from suffering any loss of hearing or any other "precious" commodity of our temporary, physical shells.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#18
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
It's called tinnitus, and because it seems to end in "itus" like "sinusitus" people think it's an infection.

It's a symptom. It can be a symptom of hearing loss, of drinking too much, of getting punched in the head, or of nothing at all.

It is harmless, but annoying, and in extreme cases can cause a moderate handicap as it affects your ability (obviously) to hear.

As far as damage goes, you have to assess what dosage you are comfortable taking and how much deterioration you are comfortable accepting later. I would argue: and this is going to be a controversial argument that hearing loss is a reasonable consequence of being a musician and enjoying music. How much loss you take by, say, 65, is up to you, but consider this:

You can't correct it. You can go to the "doctor," ie Audiologist, but they can do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to fix it. Like an Optician they can give you some sort of device to compensate for it, but essentially you're screwed. Hearing gone. Not coming back. So my feeling is if your hearing loss is not affecting your health, happiness or career, don't sweat it.

What's the point?

Mild deafness ("hard of hearing") is a common problem. While you don't want it, you don't want bad knees, either, or false teeth, or any number of ailments. The body is impermanent and frail, and one of its frailties is that the hearing goes.



We are mortal, so we are going to get old, fall apart, and die.

Some people enjoy a pipe. Some people smoke 10 packs a day and die of lung cancer.

Some people pair a fine Chardonnay with a light, summery cheese. Some people end up offering blow jobs for a bottle of cheap, grain alcohol.



It's a matter of degree. The occasional pipe smoker and the wine taster will have lung and liver damage, respectively.

So?

If you are one who enjoys music as I do, then accept that this activity will slowly diminish your ability to hear sounds beginning with the highest frequencies and proceeding eventually to the speech range, wherein you begin to have trouble hearing and understanding, you guessed it, SPEECH!

Well, to those who spout warnings about "NO SOUND ABOVE 85 dB" I say, "well, then send out our fleet of F-15 bombers and destroy every Symphony Orchestra and Opera house ever built" because the decibel levels reached in a fine orchestra hall reach well over 85 dB. I've heard of horn sections at the Chicago Symphony exceeding 120 dB!!



They have a world-class horn section.

It's accepted that football players will suffer trauma to the joints and several concussions during their career. We applaud them and offer them millions of dollars to entertain us with their sacrifice, which leads to eventual disability and dementia.



I accept that I am damaging my ears by listening to music, and if it's good music, for example a particularly powerful movement for the horns at the Chicago Symphony, then it is well worth it. I will be damaging my frail ears for a purpose of enjoying some of the most wonderful music ever composed.

Yet when a garbage truck rumbles by I put my fingers in my ears. When a couple gets into a screaming match at a restaurant, I put my fingers in my ears.

You have to be a "connoisseur" of sound, if you will.

Just as a drinker of fine wine accepts perhaps a mild cirrhosis when he/she dies at a ripe old age of unrelated causes, an aficionado of fine music can likewise expect a bit of uncomfortable ringing and probably some difficulty understanding others late in life as well.

Being totally irresponsible and destructive about your lifestyle is dangerous, but enjoying the finer things, even at the cost of just a tiny bit of our own youth and vitality, is well worth it.

One would have to live a horribly dull, sheltered and empty life indeed to keep from suffering any loss of hearing or any other "precious" commodity of our temporary, physical shells.


I don't think listening to music responsibly has any effects on the ears at all... If you listen to music at 50%-60% volume or sometimes less and you aren't a complete idiot by listening to loud performances with naked ears, then you're pretty much fine I would think. Playing an instrument, even the louder acoustic ones doesn't necessarily mean you have to accept any damage that comes with it. Neither does attending concerts often. As has been mentioned, there do exist ear plugs that mitigate the impact of loud sounds considerably.
#19
^Good music ear plugs simply reduce the volume of the sound while preserving the quality. Instead of advising people to "accept hearing loss as a consequence of being a musician", why not advise them to enjoy music and protect their hearing by wearing earplugs?

Similarly, to use one of your own examples, footballers accept that they are going to have more injuries due to them playing proffesionally but you can be sure that they'll do everything possible to minimise those injuries.

And out of interest, have you personally experienced hearing loss? To what extent?

Edit: This is to Bubonic Chronic.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Aug 16, 2010,