#1
Alright,I need to record a song tomorrow(the elfen lied lilium cover on my profile) so I need to record a sound with a decent amount of distortion and double tracking.

I have a condenser and a dynamic mic ready and I mean, might as well use them both.

Having read a bit on phase relationship, it seems I have the following options:

1.) Putting the two mics right next to each other

2.) Putting 1 mic behind the cab and reverse the phase of one mic.

3.) Ignore the placement and just pan the different tracks 100% left and right.

I already tried 1) lately but the result was rather dull. I wasn't able to invert the phase of one of the mics though. If I'm going to use 2), what mic do I place where? I guess the condenser mic is better to be placed behind the amp.
And lastly, if I use 3), will I be able to use double tracking? I don't need no stereo sound for my recording at all, just a nice groovy rhythm guitar.

also, if anybody can throw out some tricks for recording lead guitar I'd really appreciate that
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Last edited by thorbor at Aug 14, 2010,
#2
Another option would be to reversing the phasing in protools and mic from the front of the cabinet. Thats what i did when i recorded with a 609 and a 57 really good tone too. If you want a fuller sound i suggest using a nice room mic to add more depth to your mix.
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#3
I used to use method 2 quite a lot.

Position the dynamic mic as you normally would (usually on axis, around an inch from the grill cloth pointed at the spot where the dust cap meets the speaker cone) and the condenser inside the back of the amp aimed at the back of the speaker (I found 6 inches to be a good distance for my amp, but mess around with it until you find the right sound). It breaks all of the rules of phase relationship, but you can get some huge sounding guitar tracks using this method.
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#4
Quote by Sonny_sam
I used to use method 2 quite a lot.

Position the dynamic mic as you normally would (usually on axis, around an inch from the grill cloth pointed at the spot where the dust cap meets the speaker cone) and the condenser inside the back of the amp aimed at the back of the speaker (I found 6 inches to be a good distance for my amp, but mess around with it until you find the right sound). It breaks all of the rules of phase relationship, but you can get some huge sounding guitar tracks using this method.

yeah, thanks for the advice, I managed to get a fairly decent out of my amp with this method.

unfortunately, my lead song still is horrible. even gutiar pro would sound better. Even with compression and EQ'ing I couldn't change a once recorded lick for the better.
What does the EQ on the amp should look like for lead, in contrast ot rhythm?
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