#1
Whever we play shows I ALWAYS break the high E string. The saddle isn't sharp or anything, but it seems to break from there. I play quite agressively and we have a fair bit of guitar work on the G B and E strings. Is there anything I can do to prevent this or atleast reduce it?

Also, we have decided to play in D standard, would playing the strings slightly loose (10's in D standard) reduce the probability of them snapping?

Thanks
#3
It's one of these:



It's on an LTD MH-250NT, so it's probably not the best quality TOM.

And I've checked it over and it's not sharp, is there something I can put between the string and the saddle to stop it from snapping? Maybe some kind of lubricant.

I've also been looking at making my own tele from parts as my guitar doesn't really suit the music we play, and I've been wanting a tele for a while. Are there particular bridges that are less susceptible to string breakages?
Last edited by scaryfried at Aug 14, 2010,
#4
you can try big bends nut sauce or the like, but i'm not sure it would really work.

try easing your pick attack if at all possible.
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#6
Do you have to play so aggressively? I find it hard to imagine the ferocity you'd have to play with to break a string.
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#7
Quote by scaryfried
I play in a band where easing pick attack isn't really possible. Would a general lubricant work the same as Big Bends nut sauce?

fretboard oil would probably work fine.

also, consider heavier gage strings. i've never borked an .11 no matter how stupid i get on it.
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#8
Quote by Offworld92
Do you have to play so aggressively? I find it hard to imagine the ferocity you'd have to play with to break a string.


I don't play too agressively - it's just that if I were playing less aggressively than I do at the moment we would lose energy, and we are all about dynamics (as wanky as that sounds).

Quote by gregs1020
fretboard oil would probably work fine.

also, consider heavier gage strings. i've never borked an .11 no matter how stupid i get on it.


I'll try some fretboard oil, thanks. I'll try an 11 on my high E and see how that goes, and I'll put a set of 11-48's on next time we tune to D standard. Thanks!
#9
I've heard something about soldering the string wh ere it would sit on the saddle, and it wouldn't break.
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#11
A good TOM, thicker strings, a slightly lighter attack, and a little bit of lube should do you just fine
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#12
If it's always breaking at the saddle, that means the string is catching there, either on flash, a sharp saddle, too much tension, etc. Changing to Graph Tech String Saver saddles should sort you out, ot at least changing to a fresh bridge will help (although buying even just another cheap made in China bridge will usually cost the same as getting Graph Tech saddles, so you might as well just get the saddles). Using a slightly thicker 1st string wouldn't be a bad idea either.
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#13
When I was younger I went through two or three high E strings a week. I eventually switched to GHS Boomers, which are designed to last under really enthusiastic picking, and the problem went away. The downside is that Boomers sound a little dark and dull to begin with, and when they start to go bad, they get gross. But they last.

But now I just have strong hands and use heavier strings.
#15
I'd get a piece of sandpaper, like around 300 grit, fold it, and sand the saddle edge lightly with the crease of the sandpaper. This should get rid of any unseen burs and dull that edge a little. I'm not saying go to town on it and sand away, just hit it lightly until you're confident it's bur free.