#1
Hey everyone, I'm really interested in learning some classical stuff, and I've noticed there are books and websites and youtube step-by-step videos on how to play, jazz, rock, country, funk, reggea, blues, almost every major genre except for classical! I've found some Hal Leonard classical guitar books before, but they usually just throw examples at you and teach you absolutely no concepts, like just a bunch of arpegios and stuff that are good to practice but in the end don't actually teach you anything about composing stuff on your own.

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance everybody!

edit: and i dont need things explained in terms of guitar, i just need to learn the theory
Last edited by TMVATDI at Aug 15, 2010,
#2
IT's because classical music is written mostly for NOT guitars, guitar was not an orchestra instrument because it was simply not loud enough to be heard, only today with mics someone might actually use them.
#3
yeah i play other instruments, i just need something on theory, not necessarily guitar. actually piano is my preference
#4
I really don't know where you can learn about that, I guess you need to find a classically trained piano teacher or something, there are lots of those.
#5
Well y'know, most of theory comes from what we call classic music first. For a while, a lot of stuff comes from Jazz too.

That means that unless it's very focused on Jazz, anything you read on theory will be applicable to classical / orchestral.

And it doesnt even matter these days, as contemporary classical (paradox? lol) is very Jazz influenced too.. so..

Basically, when you read some source of music theory geared to something like rock guitar, it isnt that what is thought is not theory you'd use for classic.. it's just that they kinda pick the parts most applicable to the genre.
#6
Quote by ShadesOfGray
Well y'know, most of theory comes from what we call classic music first. For a while, a lot of stuff comes from Jazz too.

That means that unless it's very focused on Jazz, anything you read on theory will be applicable to classical / orchestral.

And it doesnt even matter these days, as contemporary classical (paradox? lol) is very Jazz influenced too.. so..

Basically, when you read some source of music theory geared to something like rock guitar, it isnt that what is thought is not theory you'd use for classic.. it's just that they kinda pick the parts most applicable to the genre.

well i kinda wish i could find something that picks the part most applicable to classical, i mean thats just what im into learning right now and i usually need something to learn these things from, i just dont have the kind of ear to listen to a song and say "oh, they have this sound because of these certain intervals" or whatever, my ears are just retarded in several ways...

and zeletros, i cant afford lessons, i'm already taking not-so-cheap drum lessons

edit: 1 thing i was able to learn on my own is that there are a lot o key changes in classical, i was so proud of myself when i figured that out haha
#7
Most "classical theory" is not for performers, it's for musicologists, teachers and composers. It's assumed that good performers will find a teacher to learn how to play their instrument and teach them how to read music.

Unfortunately, there are very few classical theory websites and the ones that are existent aren't very good or in depth. To learn classical theory you really need to find the right books (not websites), like Walter Piston's books and Schoenberg's books. There are places on the internet that you might be able to find these books VERY cheaply, but I wouldn't be allowed to post links or even pm links.

Quote by ShadesOfGray
as contemporary classical (paradox? lol)
No. Classical music can refer to both the era after Bach died and before... Beethoven's fourth? (I dunno, it's a gray area) and all music that is composed with certain techniques in a certain style. It's sort of hard to describe without sounding pretentious, especially since the origin of the word "classical" is very pretentious.
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#8
Quote by demonofthenight
No. Classical music can refer to both the era after Bach died and before... Beethoven's fourth? (I dunno, it's a gray area) and all music that is composed with certain techniques in a certain style. It's sort of hard to describe without sounding pretentious, especially since the origin of the word "classical" is very pretentious.


Yeah, I know. I didnt even really meant classical as a genre, it's just colloqually used that way to label anything with an ensemble/orchestral sound, with movements or pieces rather than songs.

In my eyes, the word 'classical music' neither really describes genre or timeperiod, but more as a description of 'sound'. Like how it constrasts with 'modern' sounding music, where these days most music played and written has a lot of different genres, but is usualy centered around guitars and a vocalist, with probbably a single drummer, songs rather than pieces, etc.

So, when I think of 'contemporary classic', I'm thinking of orchestral / ensemble styled pieces written by composers still alive or not too long dead, or written not earlier than the 20th century.. I'm thinking of composers like say, Philip Glass, Schoenberg or Samuel Barber. Classical in the sense that it has the trappings or formats of 'old music', but not classic in the sense that it's old enough (and it's not like you can even call it the same 'genre'!)

I'm having some trouble expressing myself.. I hope I'm somewhat making a clear argument rather than talking out of my youknowwhat
Last edited by ShadesOfGray at Aug 15, 2010,