#1
I played a used Gibson Chet Atkins Tennessean at GC yesterday, and the guy who sold it to the store had strung it up with flatwounds. It played SOOOOO smoothly and felt a like a dream in my hands.

As with everything, there's always a downfall, so I'm asking two things:

What are the cons of using flatwound strings on a guitar?

Are they ultimately better than roundwound strings?
MOMMY MAD 'CAUSE I MADE A BOOM ON THE RUG

Gretsch G5120 >>> ProCo Rat >>> Fender Bassman 4x10
#2
some people say they have a shorter life, but they typically are alot mellower sounding.
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#3
Quote by mtforever
some people say they have a shorter life, but they typically are alot mellower sounding.


I thought they had a longer playability because of less wear and tear.
MOMMY MAD 'CAUSE I MADE A BOOM ON THE RUG

Gretsch G5120 >>> ProCo Rat >>> Fender Bassman 4x10
#4
No.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#5
I had a Tele strung with heavy flatwounds once. Absolutely beautiful tone but hard to bend. They're expensive too.
#6
Quote by deluthe
I had a Tele strung with heavy flatwounds once. Absolutely beautiful tone but hard to bend. They're expensive too.


Yeah, I just saw that. $15 a pack even more for bass. I didn't have a problem bending, but these were pretty light, so go figure.
MOMMY MAD 'CAUSE I MADE A BOOM ON THE RUG

Gretsch G5120 >>> ProCo Rat >>> Fender Bassman 4x10
#7
Less fingernoise sliding up and down the strings. Mellower tone with less highs and usually they do last longer tonally because they don't have the brightness associated with round wound strings which RW lose as they get old.
Moving on.....
#8
i love them, but i cant get over how they feel when i bend them. the actually bending is no biggie, but they just bend in a weird way compared to wound.
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#9
They're good for pretty jazz, but if you want to play anything metal, thier really hard to get pinch harmonics on, I used them for training to do pinch harmonics though. They're cool and good for what they're meant for.
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#10
I found that bends became painful after a while. Also you loose a lot of brightness, which might be a plus or minus depending on your view. They are more expensive.

My suggestion would, be rather than listen to us lot telling you about them, get you self a set and see how you get on. In the end only you can decide on whether you can comfortably play them and whether you like the sound.

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#11
They sound mellower, they live longer (well, they sound mellow from the time you get them and I keep them on for monthes at a time), no more string noise, sound better strummed..

Keep in mind that I play almost exclusively jazz, (sometimes folk, I give guitar lessons for any form of music and once gave a renaissance era concert with an acoustic guitar strung up with flatwounds and tuned like a lute..) but since moving to flatwounds I haven't even considered looking back.
#12
If you like the feeling but not the mellower sound you can always try groundwound strings, which are sort of half and half.
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